Thaksin says no sports = undisciplined society

When I read this line in a news article a couple weeks ago, I couldn’t help thinking Thailand’s Prime Minister Thaksin’s words were very applicable to Taiwan.

In years of living here, I’ve never caught sight of a pick-up game of anything other than basketball. Even with basketball, people usually just shoot hoops most of the time rather than try to actually get into the game. I don’t think there are any team sport leagues in the school system. I can’t figure out where the pro teams get their players.

Perhaps Taiwan’s political mess (and hazardous roads) is due to most people never learning the basics of cooperation through sport. Anyone care to discuss this theory?

I put this in the politics forum because I figure only the government could change the situation. I think putting team sports into high schools would be a good start.

[quote=“dearpeter”]When I read this line in a news article a couple weeks ago, I couldn’t help thinking Thailand’s Prime Minister Thaksin’s words were very applicable to Taiwan.

In years of living here, I’ve never caught sight of a pick-up game of anything other than basketball. Even with basketball, people usually just shoot hoops most of the time rather than try to actually get into the game. I don’t think there are any team sport leagues in the school system. I can’t figure out where the pro teams get their players.

Perhaps Taiwan’s political mess (and hazardous roads) is due to most people never learning the basics of cooperation through sport. Anyone care to discuss this theory?

I put this in the politics thread because I figure only the government could change the situation. I think putting team sports into high schools would be a good start.[/quote]

So the deteriorating conditions in Taiwan may explain why the Taiwanese baseball team was thrashed by the Koreans? :help:

there are teams sports in highschools, but they just don’t spend much time on them (for the most part), because they won’t get you anywhere here in others’ eyes, in terms of life advancement or prestige. high test scores accomplish that.

and helping others study isn’t a good idea, because it might hurt you in the end. :s

more emphasis on (team) sports would be a great thing, but i won’t hold my breath.

In Tainan, at Cheng Da University, on their sports field, every night and especially on saturdays and sundays - Many, Many pick-up games of Basketall, BaseBall (organized league play also), badminton, and occasionally rugby & soccer. Also in the area are many tennis courts. People can play with a partner(s) or set in the waiting area and fins someone else to play a set or game.
Also many ‘join-in’ basketball games that are not heavily “organized” - pick-up games.
I have joined in many of these over the time I’ve been here. No tennis though. Just watched on occasion.

There are also several other sports fields around the city where I have seen the same thing happening.

Of course there are some cases of sports and games happeneing, but I think the participation rate is far lower than most countries. Does anyone have anty evidence for or against that statement?

I once hosted 17 Taiwanese kids (grades 3-7) in Canada. At the end of the 3-week camp, most of them reported their favorite moment was the baseball game we played with some Canadian kids. None of them had ever played baseball before. None knew the rules either.

I think this is a significant national oddity.

Interesting topic… I agree that the absence of any kind of sports culture in Taiwan is somewhat disturbing… the old adage about “all work and no play” is quite accurate and it seems that as a result of this strange non sporting status, what we’re faced with today is a nation of 23 million “dull boys” to stretch the metaphor… (in fairness perhaps 20 million, I’d say there are at least a few million folks out there who particiapte voluntarily in sport…)

specifically I have always said that there is room for a post grad thesis or three in why Taiwan is practically the only nation on earth to utterly ignore football (soccer)… As the most popular game on earth, football (soccer) could be accurately described as the world’s “national sport”… there is hardly a nation on earth in which football isn’t massively popular and widely played, including almost every other Asian nation, many of which share Taiwan’s high population density, focus on academic performance and culture that doesn’t value sporting achievement, which are the most common excuses I hear offered by the locals… “Taiwan’s too small there’s nowhere to play” is another common excuse, but since every school, university, college, stadium and park on the island has a nice grassy field available and baseball fields are bigger and harder to maintain the a reasonable football pitch, that one’s out the window… in fact as Brazil proves world class talent can be born even with nothing but some dirty ghetto streets and a old ball and Taiwan’s full of those :wink: … Of course having little experience and background in the sport, competitively Taiwan would be rubbish at football in the global and even regional arena, but that doesn