The adjective 'touristy.'

When forming comparatives and superlatives the rule is that if the word ends in Y then you remove it and add ier or iest.

Happy-happier-happiest. Silly-sillier-silliest.

Why doesn’t that happen with touristy? Is it something to do with it being more modern/informal, or is it just a pain in the ass rulebreaker?

And are there any other examples like this?

Generally forms over 3 syllables would use “more” and “most”, yes?

As a non Native, please take this with a pound of salt: isn’t touristy like pejorative, kind of? I always understood it had a negative connotation, expressed by the “y”.

Untidy untidier untidiest. No?

But the root ‘tidy’ has only two syllables.

Anyway tourist is borrowed from French and touristy is a colloquialism so it isn’t going to respond well to formal rules of English.

In my opinion, adjectives ending with y break the “syllable rule”:

touristy
touristier
touristiest

chocolatey
chocolatier
chocolatiest

touristic

conjugates to

touriststicky (eating ice cream on a hot day)

I can think of about a dozen right off the top of my head.

Adventurous
Boring
Bored
Interesting
Delicious
Minimal
Complete
Fun

So yes, it is common to use “most” for the superlative.

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]I can think of about a dozen right off the top of my head.

Adventurous
Boring
Bored
Interesting
Delicious
Minimal
Complete
Fun

So yes, it is common to use “most” for the superlative.[/quote]

None of those end in y. Fun is also a massive exception to the one syllable rules.

Slaphappy, Slaphappier, slaphappiest.

Ahh, sorry, I didn’t read the original post thoroughly. I’ll keep thinking then.

There don’t seem to be many adjectives ending in Y which are 3+ syllables. Touristy and chocolatey are two I can think of (the second only with help from this thread). Of course adverbs functioning as adjectives are another case (slowly, carefully) etc. I’d avoid the word touristy altogether however it is in the text book and I know someone will ask me about it. :frowning: Lively is also a pain in the ass, as it is 2 syllables, ends in ly (so looks like an adverb) but is an adjective.

Now let me say that it is with great caution that I dip my toe in the language discussion pool around these parts with the grammar police in such high volume, but isn’t ‘touristy’ just a cheekier, more condescending form of ‘touristed’?

No, mate.

Touristy is the adjective people should use when they mistakenly say ‘touristic.’

“Fuck me, Tainan is touristy,” said no-one ever.

I thought of another one: Kitchy. (This could be an Americanism.)

Awesome work, Hok.

Yeah, things can be kitchier.

We are no closer to a rule (the answer is ‘NO RULE’).

Indeed, ugly is quite negative …

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Indeed, ugly is quite negative …

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What is most interesting, as a non-native, is how you do draw distinctions. How do you make the distinctions, BP?

I teach some intermediate adults once a week, and my goal is for them to fuck off out of my sight. It is very hard to teach them how to stop being saps. I like them all, but I wish to God they would stop being, ‘intermediate saps.’

(I didn’t read carefully last night)

Icon, that’s not the case. Consider: happy, funny, healthy, witty, tasty, hearty, classy…

Just tell your interminable students to deal with it, superkingliest.