The Foreigners' Cause - Unfair Treatment - Conducting One's Self

I’d trade the benefit of being able to teach English even though I have zero teaching credentials for the benefit of dual nationality in a heart beat. Particularly in light of the fact that the R.O.C. might not even be here in twenty years.

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I know.

[quote=“Marco, post:35, topic:209826, full:true”]

I agree

And I agree with this too.

Let’s try to quantify this. This might not be the best method, but it’ll give us a clearer picture.

A native speaker with :100: English proficiency and 20% teaching skills, which means the teacher is only able to pass 20% of their knowledge to their students.

100*20%=20.
Students suck at English.

A non native speaker with 80 points worth of English proficiency (who knows what that means lol) and 80% teaching skills.

80*80%=64.
Students is communicatable using English.

A non English speaker with 120% teaching skills. Let’s say this teacher is just super heuristic and have magical power that’ll boost up student intelligence.

0120%=0.
Students still can’t speak English.
But they might learn some transferable skills that’ll help them (learn a new language) in the future, so when they meet teacher 1, they’ll get 100
20% + 40 = 60 or even 100*0 + 100 = 100 (self taught)

You get what I mean. As long as students learn, race, fluency, experience, nothing really matters. The out come (long term) should be the only thing that matters.

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Yikes, too much math for me. I’m better at English. :sunglasses:

But do the parents actually want their kids to learn ? I don’t think so. It seems they want a babysitter and someone white western so that they can brag to their neighbors about it.

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I know… sad :disappointed:
And the schools also don’t care.

All people want is for the kids to excel in the system. Nobody’s ever questioned whether the system makes any sense.

The only Taiwanese teacher and students that speak decent English (able to distinguish long and short vowels and to say the dark L correctly) was my teacher and some of my classmates.

Even then she was discriminated because she’s Asian. Fortunately enough for her and us, some of the parents in our kiddie school recognized her talent and decided to hire her as our tutor. I’ve never ever spoken with a Taiwanese person that could pronounce each word correctly after that. Not even the ones that spent 10 years in the United States.

I believe there are some out there that speaks fluently. Very rare cases though.

And still he government and parents are spending loads of money on those schools with poor quality…

No offense, but I know many kids who learn from foreign teachers. They still can’t distinguish the long vowels from the short ones. I honestly don’t think native speakers are necessarily better teachers.

I don’t disagree as mentioned before and have been saying it for a fuck of a long time. That being said, some of the less intellectually gifted local gentry have stereotyped me as being anti-teacher.

No I am pro teacher but for the fully qualified. Entertained by the circus but take it for what it is—a circus.

In summary, I think we agree on this issue in theory. But thinking it will ever happen…it just ain’t. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes: :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes: :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Value of training, degrees and qualifications - Work / Teaching English in Taiwan - Forumosa

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I’ve had native teachers try and wrongly “correct” my English. Hilarious but at the same time I feel bad for the kids. They’ll continue to sound like they just started to learn English. Mind you I definitely make mistakes especially if it involves spelling. They just tend to call out the wrong things and I have to pull up Google. They also don’t seem to realize words can be said differently in English.

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Funny how most teachers with qualifications aren’t as fluent as me and also not as good as teaching as I am.

Qualified teachers and teachers with qualifications aren’t necessarily the same thing :stuck_out_tongue:

I get it. And part of me loves the eclectic group of misfits, lost souls and vagabonds that congregate within the industry. While never working in it full time (other than occasional PT uni teaching early in my time in Taiwan in my early 20s decades ago when I worked in high tech FT), I enjoyed the circus. Taiwan remains my favorite expat country in terms of the foreign community. Met my wife there, etc.

But your response goes back to original discussion points. The exotic circus has advantages (higher pay than locals) but a lot of negatives (nativism in media, banks etc.) because people have that stereotype of the foreigner in Taiwan. Tighter regulation would professionalize it, but it could lose its backwater charms.

I think, to some extent, this is already happening. Much less sensationalistic drug bust stories involving certain nationalities. :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: It is getting better for foreigners in Taiwan albeit not as fast as some would like.

When I was younger, there are native speakers in USA, actually English teachers that’s teaching in USA, that believe in the “no preposition at the end of a sentence” grammar.

That’s what I meant by “philosophy of science” in another thread.

People just tend to believe whatever that’s written in a book or whatever that’s spat out of an authoritative figure’s mouth.

Only few understand about science. Especially in STEM fields. Cuz they think they’re so “scientific” they overlook their own blind spot.

We tend to classify and label things and give them some ridiculous reasons to make the world seem simpler.

Native speakers must know better cuz they’ve been doing this since they’re born, native speakers knows nothing because they’ve never learned it they’re born with it, blah blah blah… Little did we know if someone knows they know, if they don’t know they don’t know. The label (native speaker/certification/diploma, etc.) is meaningless in this context.

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You got gossip? XD

A lot less than there used to be back in the early 2000s.

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Prepositions are not words to end sentences with.
There is not a single sentence ending in a preposition that I can think of.
Pick the end of any sentence, and see if you can put a preposition in.

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:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl: you’re killing me lol

And don’t start a sentence with a conjunction.

(I used to teach writing)

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I have to admit a bias of loving the bad old circus days. When Chocolate was deported, Paraguayan diplomats were sent home for giving locals STDs, Canadians running through airports saying they knew A-bian or getting slapped by PFP politicians at police stations. When old school mods such as Jabronner pontificated like socialist first year college poli sci instructors.

Although, there are still high profile shenanigans such as the recent murder case involving the Israeli and the Yank (and Canadians).

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I dunno half of what you’re saying but it is entertaining. Had to google for the murder case. I remember seeing the news when they first found the corpse but I don’t know how it went from there.

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What ever happened to all those weirdo foreigners. All the entertainment is gone.

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This is the first time I know of this. Now I have things to read in my free time lol

What? Morally? Ethically? :laughing: