The New *Republic of China - Taiwan* Passport

Is this the right forum for it???

What are some of your thoughs, ideas, good/bad, about the new passort which have the word, TAIWAN on it. Personally, I am very proud of it. I still have the old version but am going to get the new one regardless.

Any of the natives going to get it as well??

Proud to be a Taiwanese, Taiwaner, …

~MiakaW~

If it means that when my family travels that some countries aren’t going to let my wife and son in I will hate the damn thing. However, I am all for it as long as it doesn’t cause me any problems.

I have to say I don’t really care one way or the other. I’ve never had a problem with my ordinary ROC passport, but I don’t have a problem with adding “Taiwan” or “Issued in Taiwan” to the front.

It is a great improvement to finally put the word “Taiwan” on the front of our passports. But I will not rush out to get a new passport since I can use the old one for several more years.

I think this whole thing was based on a red herring. Immigration officers are trained to know the difference between the Republic of China and the People’s Republic of China.
Can anyone authoritatively recount an instance where immigration officials were “confused” about this issue? My feeling is that it may have happened as a fluke a couple of times (then the person contacted his friend the borough chief who was pals with some city councilor who took it to his special interest legislator who then made a one-day stink about it for media publicity [Look, I am somebody], and that was it).
I approve of “Taiwan” on the passports, because it gives the Chicoms just one more piece of the puzzle solved to trigger an attack on the ROC for declaring independence.

“Even if all his life a fool associates with a wise man, he will not appreciate the truth, even as the spoon does not appreciate the flavor of the soup.”
The Buddha

Whatever the name on the passports, it would be nice if the authorities could ease the restrictions on issuing them to those of us who are not ethnically Chinese but have put down roots here and made this our permanent home.

I bet you, Miaka, have a U.S. passport as well as your R.O.C. one, so you can come and go between the two countries as and when you please. There’s no reason why that shouldn’t be so – you have a close connection with each country, so why shouldn’t you have the right to hold a passport from each? And why shouldn’t we all be in a similar position?

[quote]to those of us who are not ethnically Chinese but have put down roots here and made this our permanent home.
[/quote]
I agree, but I was under the impression that you, Omni, had not been here all that long, in spite of the language ability.
Correct away…(or are you at the front end of the rest of your life here?)

Yes, I do have 2 passport and of course I’ve been using my US passport because I don’t need to get visa to go to Singapore, Thailand, Japan…etc. But I am def. proud to have my Taiwan passport and to have the country name, Taiwan, on there. I think the main purpose to have it on there is to show the world that we are indeed an independent country. (just my personal opinion)

I think a lot of ppl went and got their new passport even though they still have their old version of it, just to support the fact the goverment and the country. I used to travel with my Taiwanese Passport and ppl kept asking me How do you like CHINA?? And I was like… no, I am from TAIWAN!! Hopefully this passport will clear some confusion.

But I heard that Hong Kong’s govt. are having some issues with is…

got my new “old” passport not long ago, not in time to apply for the new one with “Taiwan” in front. That means I may need to wait for another 9 -10 years!? unless my passport is “lost”!

It doesn’t matter though since most people know we are from Taiwan, with or without that new phrase “Issued in Taiwan”. It’s DPP’s another attempt to test/push the limit and see how the international community and China will act. China will probably make herself look like a jerk again. But if Taiwan never does this, never tries to elbow her way out, the status quo will never change. And the longer the status quo stays, the more disadvantageous it is for Taiwan. So I support the new passport, and hope it will be gradually widely accepted without problem all over the world. And I admire those who apply for it without worrying being probably boycotted by many other nations in the world.

[quote=“wolf_reinhold”][quote]to those of us who are not ethnically Chinese but have put down roots here and made this our permanent home.
[/quote]
I agree, but I was under the impression that you, Omni, had not been here all that long, in spite of the language ability.
Correct away…(or are you at the front end of the rest of your life here?)[/quote]How many people have a passport despite living abroad their whole lives ?

This may be somewhat naive, but isn’t the main source of dissention between the ChiComs and the ChiDems about face? No one wants to back down and the ChiComs are continually grousing that there can be only one China. Therefore, by dropping the name ROC, are not our hosts effectively stating that they are NOT China? In other words, is the DPP saying to Beijing, “You are right, there is only one China and you are welcome to it. We are Taiwanese if you please.”

Just my simple thoughts. Miaka? What do you think?

Toe Save:

I agree with what you said partically. It is about face, but I think China have been pressuring Taiwan and other countries as well, to make sure that the whold world knows there is only one CHINA. On the new passport, it still have Republic of China on the cover, just on the bottom, they added Taiwan to make sure that ppl knows the passport holders are from Taiwan, not China.

But I don’t know if you have noticed, most ppl that got their new passport are mainly ppl that are in DDP (can I make that assumption) Because I haven’t seen anyone from KMParty have applied for it. I think we don’t need to look at this new passport as a political issues, but more of it as to stand out in the nation / world. (just MPO)

[quote=“MiakaW”]Toe Save:

I agree with what you said partically. It is about face, but I think China have been pressuring Taiwan and other countries as well, to make sure that the whold world knows there is only one China. On the new passport, it still have Republic of China on the cover, just on the bottom, they added Taiwan to make sure that ppl knows the passport holders are from Taiwan, not China.

But I don’t know if you have noticed, most ppl that got their new passport are mainly ppl that are in DDP (can I make that assumption) Because I haven’t seen anyone from KMParty have applied for it. I think we don’t need to look at this new passport as a political issues, but more of it as to stand out in the nation / world. (just MPO)[/quote]

But what would happen if Taiwan completely dropped any reference to being ROC? Would that save face for both countries and allow a smooth transition to finally being recognized?

If Taiwan ever drop the reference of ROC, I think Taiwan will be in deep trouble, meaning WAR!!! That is why DDP is trying to change the name slowly… :wink:

Entirely possible. Like I said, my idea may be somewhat naive…but I rather prescribe to the philosophy of innocence so aptly summed up in your signature statement, my little Miaka…

If only Beijing would read it. There can be only one love.

Probably not, since the “One China” principle is more than simply just “there is only one China” … it also includes " … and Taiwan is part of it."

As to the passport thing, I’m not Taiwanese, so it’s not my business. My take on it, though, is it’s of course just a political issue, and not really one implemented out of necessity. The DPP is, like a previous poster said, just “testing the waters” so to speak to see how far they can go. I think it’s fascinating watching the constant tit-for-tat, and am even more interested in seeing what will happen if the KMT regains power in next year’s election. Exciting times we’re living in …

Probably not, since the “One China” principle is more than simply just “there is only one China” … it also includes " … and Taiwan is part of it."

As to the passport thing, I’m not Taiwanese, so it’s not my business. My take on it, though, is it’s of course just a political issue, and not really one implemented out of necessity. The DPP is, like a previous poster said, just “testing the waters” so to speak to see how far they can go. I think it’s fascinating watching the constant tit-for-tat, and am even more interested in seeing what will happen if the KMT regains power in next year’s election. Exciting times we’re living in …[/quote]

Someone wrote in an earlier thread (I am too lazy to look up the quote) that China never was interested in Taiwan until the latter half of the last century. It, IMHO, is just Beijing trolling and flexing…its a typical brawl on a Saturday night at Vibe…9 against one…I am reading Life and Death In Shanghai right now…I really hate those Red bastards…if they did invade, I would be down on the beach shooting them from my foxhole…right beside Juba…and I wouldn’t even do this for Canada, even if Blueface hisself was crossing the 48th.

[quote=“wolf_reinhold”]I agree, but I was under the impression that you, Omni, had not been here all that long. …
Correct away…(or are you at the front end of the rest of your life here?)[/quote]

I hope I’m still at the front end of the rest of my life here, but it’s already been more than 17 years since I first arrived (the same as you, Wolfie, if I recall correctly).

Seventeen years as a law-abiding taxpayer ought to be enough to earn me one of those little green books.

Who’ll be starring in this epic…Pauly Shore and one of the Baldwin brothers? Thanks but I think I’ll wait till it’s released on Cinemax. It’ll be good for a cheap laugh.

BTW, “foxhole” is used by people who have watched too many John Wayne movies as kids…the proper term is “fighting position”. First you should learn how to build one.

call.army.mil/products/ctc_bull/96-4/chpt2.htm

I met Nien Cheng in Kittaning, Pennsylvania back in 1989 (I think) and talked to her about her book. She was an inspirational old woman.