The Problem of Taiwan's Libel Laws . . .

Some useful info here on how to avoid trouble

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Rather disappointing. The conclusion is blindingly obvious–don’t break the law dummy. Then there are bits like this:

However, defamation laws have the opposite effect of what Chen Chih-hsiang had intended. Instead of preventing rich people from abusing the Criminal Code, the law is now allowing businesses, politicians, and individuals to offset criticism and sue other individuals, businesses, and journalists from exposing and discussing questionable things openly.

But no examples of such cases are given. Clearly there is a lot of public criticism happening, and I recall hearing about very few cases of prosecution. Some analysis of that would have been interesting.

Here is an example plus further deliberation

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This is because I was avoiding the possibility to get sued for using examples of libel and being sued for libel by people that make it their jobs. There is sadly only a don’t break the law dummy scenario because that’s what many of my friends have experienced. Sad, but true.

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It may be true, but you don’t have to wait 2 and 1/2 years to back with a reply…
:rofl:

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I can’t fault the advice! Some people do seem to need to hear it. Always interested in examples of this kind of stuff though. Outside of the well known “salty food” case, can’t think of many.

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Yeah, I learned my lesson. Even with facts and even with evidence of someone being malevolent or wrong, calling them out can get you sued. Be careful…

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Lol, I just got my account a few weeks back and became active today. This place is a goldmine for the good, bad and the ć´‹äşş

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Something that I’m interested in:
If an establishment refuses you entry because you’re a WAIGUOREN! or don’t have your passport on you, and you capture the exchange on video, then post it on social media, chastising them for their idiocy, can they sue you for slander or whatever they usually sue for?
It hasn’t happened to me. Just checking.