The Taipei Times (Part 3)

As with the original thread, How to run a newspaper into the ground in 3 years, The Taipei Times - Part Deux thread has gotten too long to be manipulated, which means mods can’t merge or split posts in or out of the thread. (Click on the above words to go to the original thread).

Further posts about the Taipei Times should go here.

Discussion of news in the Taipei Times can be started in separate threads (or added into existing ones). This thread is for the discussion of the newspaper itself and to indulge those whose favourite pastime is picking mistakes in the paper :wink:

Brian

To mark the birth of this new thread, let me immediately go on record as saying that I think the Taipei Times is a wonderful newspaper, and that my life would be very much poorer without it.

And now over to you, Wolf. :wink:

:bulb: [Edited by moderator: for an explanation of why long threads are split, see here ] :bulb:

Well, Omni, read the Monday editorials. They are written by your idol.
And well I remember the days when the TT prided itself on having three full sports pages…now there’s usually half that. What a shame. I guess mindless biligual shit is worth killing the sports coverage, though. :x :smiling_imp:

You’re complaining about the Taipei Times’s sports coverage, Wolf? I assume you haven’t seen the glorious cleavage shot on the back page of today’s paper. Get an eyeful of that and I’m sure you will complain no more!

The time is right for the introduction of Page 3 girls in the TT. Could rename it the Titty Times.

It was discussed, but the president is a church-going Christian and wouldn’t like that stuff…although ads for prostitutes masqurading as massage girls seems to be OK. :unamused:

Good story by David Momphard titled “Nowhere to call home” in Sunday’s paper about the plight of orphans and abandoned children in Taiwan. Well done David.

Alita Rickards covered the same subject on Friday in the China Post, also a good story.

weird, they both covered the same thing on the same weekend. WHY? was there some kind of harmonic convergence this week or did the St Anne people hold a press conference, or are David and Alita the same people person.

Confess.

[quote=“winter”]Alita Rickards covered the same subject on Friday in the China Post, also a good story.

weird, they both covered the same thing on the same weekend. WHY? was there some kind of harmonic convergence this week or did the St Anne people hold a press conference, or are David and Alita the same people person.

Confess.[/quote]
They probably got the press release the same day.

Today’s TT editorial said:

Correct me if I am wrong, but either I am missing something or the editorial writer doesn’t know what he is talking about.
My understanding is that the Executive Yuan could choose to send the bill back to the Legislative Yuan for reconsideration – in effect, vetoing the legislation. The legislature would then vote on the existing bill; if two-thirds voted to uphold the bill, it would stand. Given the political mix in the legislature, this would be impossible. If the two-thirds was not achieved, the veto would stand and the bill would be dead.
Hypothetically, even if the legislature got the two-thirds vote, the premier could elect to either accept the result or resign – not necessarily taking the entire Cabinet with him.
I do not see how the “results will remain the same” nor do I see how the “legislature might dismiss the Cabinet.”
Any Taiwan political scientists out there to call this one?

[quote=“wolf_reinhold”]Today’s TT editorial said:

My understanding is that the Executive Yuan could choose to send the bill back to the Legislative Yuan for reconsideration – in effect, vetoing the legislation. The legislature would then vote on the existing bill; if two-thirds voted to uphold the bill, it would stand. Given the political mix in the legislature, this would be impossible. If the two-thirds was not achieved, the veto would stand and the bill would be dead.
Hypothetically, even if the legislature got the two-thirds vote, the premier could elect to either accept the result or resign – not necessarily taking the entire Cabinet with him.
I do not see how the “results will remain the same” nor do I see how the “legislature might dismiss the Cabinet.”[/quote]
In Taiwan, it doesn’t take two-thirds to override a veto but an absolute majority of legislators. This number, however, must be a majority of the total number of legislators, not just those voting on the measure. The Legislative Yuan has (I think) 225 members. If, for example, 110 voted to override a veto and 100 to sustain it (with some absent or abstaining), the veto would not be overridden; that would take at least 113 votes.

I’m a little less clear on if the following are an interrelated, sequential chain of events, or if they could come independently of each other.

If(?) the Legislative Yuan overrides the veto, a vote could be called to dismiss the premier as long as at least one-third of the members cosponsored the measure. Dismissing the premier would take but an absolute majority. And a new premier would surely appoint a new Cabinet.

If(?) the premier were dismissed, however, the president could retaliate by dissolving the Legislature, forcing new elections.

If a vote to dismiss the premier fails, another such vote could not be called for one year.

Them’s some high-stakes poker.

OK, I looked it up:
Article 3 of the ROC Constitution:

[quote]Should the Executive Yuan deem a statutory, budgetary, or treaty bill passed by the Legislative Yuan difficult to execute, the Executive Yuan may, with the approval of the president of the Republic and within ten days of the bill’s submission to the Executive Yuan, request the Legislative Yuan to reconsider the bill. …
Should more than one-half of the total number of Legislative Yuan members uphold the original bill, the president of the Executive Yuan shall immediately accept the said bill. …
With the signatures of more than one-third of the total number of Legislative Yuan members, the Legislative Yuan may propose a no-confidence vote against the president of the Executive Yuan. …
Should more than one-half of the total number of Legislative Yuan members approve the motion, the president of the Executive Yuan shall tender his resignation within ten days, and at the same time may request that the president dissolve the Legislative Yuan. [/quote]
But remember in the same article:

So even if the legislature succeeded with a no-confidence vote, the president would appoint a successor and, unless the president himself opted to dissolve the Cabinet, the Cabinet would remain intact.

A journo friend sent me this article (see below) this morning. When I saw it I thought, “oh this is perfect for the Taipei Times, the solution to all their problems”. I am sure the software could be “tweaked” to crank out semi-pseudo english stories of the stock variety the Taipei Loser Times publishes (e.g. China is Mean Bully of Sweet Taiwan, New Show Plan to Distract Voters from DPP Incompetence, Scholars Meet to Discuss Lame Brain Plans, ect.).

And then they could fire all their foreign staff and just keep the local staff (consisting of people who otherwise can not find a job and are somehow owed favors by Old Man Lin or the Nutty Professor).

Now one may say; “oh the software will produce stories that are inaccurate, dull and full of grammar mistakes”.

How is that different than now?

take care,
Brian
here is the story

These DJ Reporters Work so Hard,
They’re Not Even Human
December 3, 2003

Some of Dow Jones’ newest reporters have very little personality, a stilted writing style and no idea how to file a feature. Despite those failings, they’re extremely popular among their more lively colleagues and have greatly expanded the range of Newswires’ corporate coverage in Asia.

Working with editorial staff in Asia, Singapore-based programmer Renga Ramasamy has spent much of the past year creating “automated reporters” to rewrite and repackage corporate disclosure announcements in some of Asia’s biggest markets. These software programs pick up releases from companies in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur and reformat them into earnings tables or spot-story lookalikes. In most cases, the software generates descriptive and easy-to-understand headlines for these items.

In Tokyo, for example, press releases on earnings forecasts from more than 2500 companies are transformed within seconds into a Dow Jones-standard table. Earnings announcements from all 800-or-so listed companies in Hong Kong are repackaged in the same manner - right down to a stylebook-perfect headline. And in Singapore, every announcement relating to trading by company directors or major shareholders is sent to the wire automatically, in most cases with a headline that includes the director’s name and whether they increased or decreased their stake.

These programs have freed bureau reporters from the drudgery of typing up earnings tables and writing through corporate disclosure releases. They’ve also allowed Dow Jones to broaden its Asian equities coverage to include earnings and disclosure news from all listed companies in Hong Kong, and the vast majority in Tokyo, Singapore and K.L.

Sounds a brilliant idea. Do you have a clue where to read one or two samples of such machine-made articles?

If it works, all Taiwanese can quit learning English but this software. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

You don’t need software to get rid of the TT crew…
The Nutty Professor (the president of the Taipei Times) once told me that if things went bad at the paper (financially) that the printed version could easily be stopped and the paper could be totally online. He then mentioned that all the editors would be let go in that case. But who would edit the articles? I asked. No one, of course. The reporters, I was told, would file their stories directly to the Web site. I didn’t pursue this since I figured it I pushed, I’d probably end up getting the entire copy desk fired.

Call this nitpicking, but…
I am really getting tired of the way the TT wantonly tracks* in or out headlines. There is an established limit created by the woman who designed the entire paper, but the TT doesn’t seem to realize this or doesn’t care.
Look at today’s headline on the front page: Lien lists ‘three dangers’ of re-electing Chen
…and contrast it with the one on page three: Being on the right side of history

Some tracking is fine, but when all the letters nearly touch it starts to be annoying. There is a reason for the limit on tracking. Going too far makes the headline look ugly.

  • Tracking is the adjustment of space for groups of letters and entire blocks of text.

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003079232

Funny, this story about some local people protesting about not wanting an incinerator in their area, and the photo shows one of the protesters with a big fat fag in his mouth, puffing away! THe irony of it all: he wants his neighborhood free of pollution, which is a noble cause, and yet he inhales that poison every day himself. I laugh, because I am a lifetime longterm smoker myself, and while I see the humor, I just can;t break the habit. It’;s the nicotine, stupid!

What’s the deal with the new formatting of the online TT? :frowning:

It is really messed up when viewed with Netscape 7.

Is the webmaster such an incompetent idiot that he/she doesn’t even test how pages look with any other browsers than Microsoft’s Explorer?

(That is just a rhetorical question since the answer is obvious.)

In all fairness to webmasters, Netscape 6 and 7 were pretty buggy releases, and Netscape the browser is dead and buried now. Mozilla is the open source project that took over where Netscape left off. The new design looks just fine on Mozilla 1.5.

The new design looks just fine on Mozilla 1.5.[/quote]

Well son of a gun, when I posted this, their site did load fine. Now it looks like a nice Picasso.

What I wanted to post about though was the “self-voyeurs” in yesterday’s Taipei Times. What the hell are self-voyeurs? People who sneak peeks of themselves?

I think they meant ‘exhibitionists’.

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 9884/print

And bless their little hearts, they also included a nice example of the practice so we’d know what they are talking about.