The Taiwan people

I see this all the time, and it grates on my senses each time. “The 23 million Taiwan people” is another variation of this. It sounds like Chinglish, and yet it’s used in all of the English-language newspapers here (I know, none of them have exactly stellar editing or writing standards). There’s a perfectly usable adjective form we are allowed to use in this day and age: “Taiwanese”. Why doesn’t anyone use it? Nobody says “The America people” or “The Britain people” after all.

ROFL yeah that is irritating.

I take it out of every CNA story that comes across my desk. They put it straight back in “because that’s what he (whichever braindead politico said it) said.”
Then I say “Well, let’s at least be accurate. Exactly how many people of Taiwan were there at the last census? If you’re happy to be a part of mangling the English language, at least get your figures right.”
Then I get a stern rebuke about being unharmonious. I’ve tried adding “the 400 million American people” and “the 55 million British people” to the relevant stories, as well as asking in complete innocence exactly how many people DO live in Chad or Swaziland, but they just don’t get it.
Fuck 'em. If they want to look like daft hayseeds who am I to stand in their way?

[quote=“sandman”]I take it out of every CNA story that comes across my desk. They put it straight back in “because that’s what he (whichever braindead politico said it) said.”
Then I say “Well, let’s at least be accurate. Exactly how many people of Taiwan were there at the last census? If you’re happy to be a part of mangling the English language, at least get your figures right.”
Then I get a stern rebuke about being unharmonious. I’ve tried adding “the 400 million American people” and “the 55 million British people” to the relevant stories, as well as asking in complete innocence exactly how many people DO live in Chad or Swaziland, but they just don’t get it.
Fuck 'em. If they want to look like daft hayseeds who am I to stand in their way?[/quote]

So how is the 1 sandman people doing at work today :laughing:

some journals pertaining to research done on taiwan and “the taiwan people” require: chinese people in taiwan or other vagueness. the only certainty is avoiding “taiwanese” …

I’m heading out to CNA right now. I’ve been spanking an RZX to 12,000 revs all afternoon, have drunk three beers and a half-bottle of a VERY nice 2002 graves, so I’m good and ready. Bring it on!

They don’t like the -ese, cause somebody told them it’s bad. Remember that mail that was pass around a couple of years ago?

TT
… At least they have ‘Taiwanese’ right …

99% of the references I see are from DPP sources. You’d think the current administration would be on the word “Taiwanese” like white on rice, but since they’re such moderate, restrained and well-reasoned individuals, they could at least think of some reasonable English terminology to replace their fear of that particular word. In any case, I’m sure that what they’re translating is “tai2wan1ren2”, but for some reason the English-language media, including the deep-green ones, resort to “the Taiwan people” for some reason.

On the bright side, at least they don’t have an unnatural aversion to a word like “the” or “pants”.

two reasons :

  1. cha bu duo; a national religion
  2. some mid level panty waste manager who spent a summer in New York knows better than you because he make ah good ah Engrish.

two reasons :

  1. cha bu duo; a national religion
  2. some mid level panty waste manager who spent a summer in New York knows better than you because he make ah good ah Engrish.[/quote]

I got scolded so many times for using “Taiwanese”, you would think I was using a medical term. I am under specific instructions to use this term “carefully and sparingly”, and the first thing I had to learn was that “no, it doesn’t refer to all the people from Taiwan, it is a political term”.

I wished this “Taiwan people” usage was little more than stubborness regarding “my English is better than thou” but it is a more omnious symptom.

Edit: Case in point:

taipeitimes.com/News/front/a … 2003371562

A report yesterday in the Chinese-language United Evening News said that when the selected films were first listed on the film festival’s official Web site two days ago, the country of origin for Lee Ang’s film was listed as “China-US,” which upset his Taiwanese fans.

Yes, but how does the “Taiwan is an independence and sovereign nation” DPP have a problem with the word “Taiwanese”? The only reason I can think of is that it wants to reserve the word for people whose families have been here for a certain amount of time or longer, which is just stupid…oh, wait. Never mind.

To which you should respond that you’re writing in English for an English-speaking publication and that sorry, “Taiwanese” means “people from Taiwan.” End of story. They can twist the meanings of words to suit their country bumpkin sensitivities, but it only works if the reader is as much of a dumb fucking cretin as the writer. Normal people read it and understand the real meaning.
“`Taiwanese’ refers only to the people living in Taiwan that we like. It doesn’t refer to people living here who are stinky.” Bzzzzzt. Wrong answer, fuckwit.

Bastardising the language of Aelfred for their cretinarian partisanism! Damn the Taiwantards!

[quote]Quote:
and the first thing I had to learn was that “no, it doesn’t refer to all the people from Taiwan, it is a political term”.

To which you should respond that you’re writing in English for an English-speaking publication and that sorry, “Taiwanese” means “people from Taiwan.” End of story. They can twist the meanings of words to suit their country bumpkin sensitivities, but it only works if the reader is as much of a dumb fucking cretin as the writer. Normal people read it and understand the real meaning.
“`Taiwanese’ refers only to the people living in Taiwan that we like. It doesn’t refer to people living here who are stinky.” Bzzzzzt. Wrong answer, fuckwit.

[/quote]

Guys, first of all, my workplace is blue as far as the eye can see (and don’t tell me they are obeying the green bosses because that’ll be a cold day in hell, IMHO). I blame both sides for chopping up the English language, though they may have different reasons, the end result is the same.

Actually, even if I did not write in English, since “English rules”, then something like Taiwan airlines see high incidence of irrational actions by passengers cannot become Taiwanese airlines. in any language.

EDIT:

Just noticed that the Taipei Times wrote it quite nicely: Taiwanese airlines record large number of `abnormal’ acts

and

Taiwan-based airlines have experienced a high number of “abnormal actions”

Now THAT’s clear.

It does in mine. Like British, French, Portuguese, etc. I don’t give a toss what they do with my copy once it leaves my desk, but it’ll read correctly at least until it leaves my desk.

Why not?

Why not?[/quote]

That’s just crazy talk. EVERYONE knows that Taiwanese are the most rational of all human beings.

Why not?[/quote]

That’s just crazy talk. EVERYONE knows that Taiwanese are the most rational of all human beings.[/quote]

Because that’s the way the cookie crumbles.

It goes along with “why do you take more space to say the same thing?”. I bite my tongue almost in half so I won’t scream: because it is not English, that’s why! :wall: :frowning:

This is an excellent example of how much trouble the mighty greens have had imposing their political will. At a certain green TV station for example, management can’t seem to stop its anchors from referring to ‘dalu’ even though station policy is to say ‘zhonngguo’. And it is in small details like this one that reactionary blue civil servants attempt in their own small way to subvert the current government policies.

Anyway, look how long its has taken them to start doing something about all those Sinocentric terms in textbooks. It’s going to take two or three more terms of Green rule before this problem get solved.