They're canceling the "out at age 20" rule

Yes, you could start a business with an initial investment of NT$500,000 and then have the business sponsor her for a work permit as its manager. The problem with this approach for many is that from the second year on, the business has to generate NT$3 million in revenue (not profit, just sales) to be eligible to continue the work permit.

There are some other paths to residence through investment but this is the one with the lowest initial costs.

She could also study Chinese at one of the many university-affiliated language centers. She gets an ARC after four months and a limited work permit after one year.

She could also try to get a job with a startup or a company in one of the Science Parks. The two-year minimum work experience requirement has been waived.

Your wife might also be able to adopt her. Not sure if this still works though.

If you haven’t done so already, please consider liking and sharing Forward Taiwan’s page on Facebook. facebook.com/forwardtaiwan. It would help even more if your wife would do the same. We need Taiwanese people to support immigration reform.

You can also read our proposals for reform here: forwardtaiwan.com/our-proposals/

AFAIK yes.[/quote]

AFAIK, no? Teachers are governed by the DoE and as such aren’t white collar. But I may be wrong.

Teacher are eligible for the six-month extensions of residence.

Article 22 of the Regulations Governing Visiting, Residency, and Permanent Residency of Aliens states that:

The seven types of employment are:

[quote]1.Specialized or technical work.
2.Director/manager/executive of a business invested in or set up by overseas Chinese or foreigner(s) with the authorization of the Government of the Republic of China.
3.Teacher at the following schools:
(1)Teacher at a public or registered private college/university or school established especially for foreign residents.
(2)Approved teacher teaching course(s) on foreign language(s) at a public or registered private primary or high school.
(3)Teacher teaching course(s) at a public or registered private experimental high school’s bilingual department or at bilingual school(s) .
4.Full-time teacher teaching course(s) on foreign language(s) at a short-term class registered for supplementary schooling in accordance with the Supplementary Education Act.

5.Sports coach and athlete.
6.Religious, artistic, and show business work.
7.Crew member of a merchant vessel, working vessel, and vessel ad hoc permitted by the Ministry of Transportation and Communication.[/quote] Employment Services Act 46.
Hence teachers are eligible.

The confusion may arise because we use the term 'white collar professional" but the law does not.

[quote=“Feiren”]Yes, you could start a business with an initial investment of NT$500,000 and then have the business sponsor her for a work permit as its manager. The problem with this approach for many is that from the second year on, the business has to generate NT$3 million in revenue (not profit, just sales) to be eligible to continue the work permit.

There are some other paths to residence through investment but this is the one with the lowest initial costs.
[/quote]
Thanks for the many suggestions Feiren. I was thinking that if my wife (Taiwan national) started the business, it wouldn’t be subject to the 3mil requirement and could sponsor a foreigner (daughter) as an employee (not manager.) It’s just an idea.I will take a look at the Facebook page. Thanks :thumbsup:

Actually the minimum capital/revenue requirements are even higher for Taiwanese businesses. If your wife starts the business the business will have to have NT$5 million in capital the first year and then NT$10 million in revenue to maintain the work permit.

Taiwan also has working holiday visas available for some nationalities.

boca.gov.tw/lp.asp?ctNode=78 … DSD=7&mp=2

What passport does she have?

My daughter has a US passport but she is also eligible for a British passport. Wow, that’s crazy that native -owned businesses have to have such high earnings before they can hire foreigners. I never heard of that.

^How does she know she would want to stay long term in Taiwan?
At least with that or those passports, she can stay at least 90 days before exiting and returning for another 90 days (basically indefinitely) before she makes up her mind or you figure out another solution.

She has visited Taiwan several times and is pretty sure she wants to live there with us. She likes it better than US or UK. As a last resort, she would do the Hong Kong Shuffle at least until she can find a sponsor for a work permit and a job she likes. I was just caught off guard by the fact that she wouldn’t be covered by the JFRV and I’m looking for the simplest solution. She wants to be a picture book illustrator. It’s funny, her older sister was born in Taiwan but wasn’t allowed to leave the country because her father is a foreigner and so she couldn’t get a Taiwanese passport. Since there is no British embassy in Taiwan, I couldn’t get her a British passport either. We had to ask friends in Hong Kong to get her a passport and send it to us so we could exit the country. Taiwan is lovable but very frustrating!

British passport holders are eligible for the Taiwan’s working holiday program. That might be a good way for to stay in Taiwan and look for a job for the first few months.

Thanks Feiren, that’s another great suggestion we will look into.

I’d also strongly suggest a plan to study Chinese from the beginning. People who don’t start right away usually don’t learn the language because they get busy with other things and find that it is easy to get by with survival Chinese and English. That’s fine, but you are missing out on a lot if you don’t know the language and your job possibilities are restricted.

If I were here, I would come on the working holiday visa and enroll in one of the university-affiliated Mandarin Training Centers right away. She can work for the first five months on the working holiday visa. She’ll need to stop working for seven months but she can start working again after one year of enrollment at an MTC. It’s an open work permit for up to 18 hours a week. I believe you can get an ARC for up to two years studying at a Mandarin training center and maintain the work permit. That should give her plenty of time to figure out if she really wants to live in Taiwan and hopefully to find meaningful work.

Sounds like a plan. It will be a couple of years before we make the move but she will very likely start out studying Chinese. I tried to convince my wife of the importance of formally studying English when she first came here but she didn’t listen (do they ever?). So after 20 years she still speaks fluent Chinglish.

Hello All, I would like to double check the new rule about 6 month extension of ARC after the quitting the job. I am quiting my job this week (receiving the letter of contract cancellation). Is it enough to show this paper (and possibly my current ARC + passport) to get the exgtension of 6 month to search for the new job?

Sorry, I don’t know the answer to your question. If your question had anything whatsoever to do with the topic of this thread you’d probably get more answers. You should try starting a new thread or searching through the forum.