TIME: Asia's Overscheduled Kids

Original Title: interesting TIME article

[color=red]Admin note: I reposted the entire article (in small font, to save space) because only TIME’s current content is free - archived content is only availble to subscribers.[/color]

[quote=“TIME”][size=59]Asia’s Overscheduled Kids
Forget about playtime. Children today are caught up in an endless race of extra tuition sessions, tennis classes, piano lessons, late-night homework and much, much more. Are we preparing them for success or overloading them with stress?
BY LIAM FITZPATRICK

The “E.M.B.A.” program that kicks off on a Sunday morning in the heart of Shanghai’s financial district is much like any other curriculum designed to train the future business leaders of China. “We give students the tools they need to build up their confidence,” says Vivian Liu, general manager of the popular two-year-old program, which has seen 1,500 participants pass through its doors. But the difference between Liu’s course and others is this: when the demands of subjects like economics or communications get too taxing, her students might just respond by having a good cry and asking for their mommies. How so? They’re children. The e in this E.M.B.A. program stands not for executive but early, and the oldest student in the class is age 6. Civil servant He Jiachen sends his 3-year-old, He Xingzhen, to the E.M.B.A. course while he and his wife pursue their own adult M.B.A.s. “My son is developing well,” he says. “In class, he isn’t afraid of giving speeches, and he likes to be a team leader in group activities.”

High expectations for children are nothing new in China, where the need to master the thousands of characters necessary for basic literacy

VERY INTERESTING: “With reporting by Aravind Adiga/New Delhi, Hannah Beech and Bu Hua/Shanghai, Susan Jakes and Nicole Qu/Beijing, Austin Ramzy/Hong Kong, Toko Sekiguchi and Yuki Oda/Tokyo and Jake Lloyd-Smith/Singapore.”

BUT NOTICE, not one word about Taiwan, and not one reporter listed as reporting for the article from Taipei. Are the editors in Hong Kong, where TIME ASIA is edited, so blind they cannot get some info and quotes from Taiwan?

But yes, very interesting article. Thanks for bringing it to our attention! here…

and interestingly enough not one mention of kids being sent to English buxibans (not that i saw anyway… just skimmed the thing).

Yes, some mention about “buxibans”, though they’re definitely not called that in certain Asian countries such as India or Japan.

Actually used this article in my Reading class yesterday. A real hot button issue. The discussion segment of the class was so energized that we’ve decided to carry the article over to next week’s class. We are going to co-author a letter to the ed. and submit it as part of the assignment.

Alot of what is written in the artice is ripped straight from my lesson on rote vs trial and error learning. But, like my lessons, the warnings this article is offering will fall mostly on deaf ears.

Alas… :loco:

Well, the most interesting question is always Why?:

[quote]High expectations for children are nothing new in China, where the need to master the thousands of characters necessary for basic literacy

We’re using the Time for Kids magazine in my Buxiban and in the issue we did this week we came across the same, but simplified article. It says that Korean kids spend about 49 hrs per week in school, after school classes, on homework and with tutors. I did a quick survey in my class of 11 year olds and it came to an average of 65 hrs per week. And they say that they have even more free time than some of their friends.

[quote=“mod lang”]

[quote]
The only way to master the written Chinese language is by lots and lots of painful rote memorization. Knowing the radicals and roots helps, but it’s 90% rote memorization.[/quote][/quote]

But the same thing seems to be true for all subjects in Taiwan. What is English in the public schools? Rote memorization. Now my knowledge of how a Chinese kid learns the language is limited at very best, but surely there must be another way.

As for them going to the roman alphabet it seems to me that it would be next to impossibe because so many words have the same sound. Again I admit to typing before thinking but feel free to correct me.

[quote=“Cola”]VERY INTERESTING: “With reporting by Aravind Adiga/New Delhi, Hannah Beech and Bu Hua/Shanghai, Susan Jakes and Nicole Qu/Beijing, Austin Ramzy/Hong Kong, Toko Sekiguchi and Yuki Oda/Tokyo and Jake Lloyd-Smith/Singapore.”

BUT NOTICE, not one word about Taiwan, and not one reporter listed as reporting for the article from Taipei. Are the editors in Hong Kong, where TIME Asia is edited, so blind they cannot get some info and quotes from Taiwan?

But yes, very interesting article. Thanks for bringing it to our attention! here…[/quote]

Seoul, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta and many other Asian cities don’t rate a mention either.

Any kid in Korea who is only studying 49 hours a week is getting off lucky. There’s a saying in Korea that if you sleep 4 hours a night, you’ll have a chance to get into (a good) university; if you sleep 5 hours a night, tough luck.
My high school students generally started school at 7 in the morning, got home from school at about midnight, then maybe had a tutor come to teach them English for an hour or so, and then were expected to study. One typical boy had his mother help him study by sitting beside him holding a stick - if he fell asleep, she’d hit him with it.