Tiny Micro Apartment Living Taipei

#21

The pictures clearly makes it look bigger. You can see it really clearly in the bathroom with how the perspective is. I bet a average size male would feel really uncomfortable once you step inside.

#22

Realtors sell compact and bijou for a reason.

#23

I personally really miss the country side. Even though my house in Taiwan and apartment I rented in Malaysia are pretty big. I miss the high ceilings giving me a feeling of space to breath. I sleep like a baby when I go back to Texas or in Tuscany country villa. I really dislike low ceilings.

#24

Just throw in some convertible furniture.

#25

Texas is totally different. You never breathe as easily as when you’re back there, once you’ve lived there. Just driving down the highway from the airport I always feel like “there’s finally space”. Even though for me, there’s really not (in Texas, anymore, anyway).

#26

I never thought I would miss texas of all places lol Couldn’t wait to move. I love it there with a lot of land and just straight flat empty roads. Cheap gas and cheapest car prices for big engines.

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#27

“At your Texas Ford dealer”… no other state has “At your StateName Anything dealer” except Texas.

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#28

Wow thats a nice little flat. I kind of prefered placea like that when i was single, so easy and cosy. Married with a kid now and our living room is ywice that size,pain to clean with the mountain of kids toys

#29

There is barely space to stretch your legs and arms.

#30

This one’s pretty good but I need to stand up in my bedroom. And a nice view is critical if living in a tiny space.

#31

22m2 is not that tiny, I find it to be actually quite big. Even ignoring HK(I had a colleague who lived in 9m2 when he first arrived after graduating) you got a lot of cities where it is common to live in places smaller than that… Even in cities like Sthlm or hki you got a lot of young people living in places smaller than 22m2.

#32

Should any of you be thinking of doing this yourself, I took a couple of snapshots of the rammed-earth construction I’m working on. This is very much a proof-of-concept prototype, not something I intend to live in (it’ll be used for storing farm equipment; the locals tend to assume that if something isn’t nailed down, it belongs to them).

Don’t underestimate the physical labour involved in moving several tonnes of material by hand. Anything bigger than this will need powered concrete mixers at the very least, and preferably pneumatic rammers.

This has a 2.4x2.4 footprint and 1.85x1.85 internal space. This was done entirely with manual labour (apart from a power drill) and turd-world materials; for example crushed stone for aggregate is simply unavailable, so I was curious how the concrete would turn out with the ungraded river gravel that’s typically used. Answer: it’s a bit crap, but it does the job.

If you’re thinking one of those walls looks a bit askew, that’s because it is. It leans an inch out at the top. Lesson: check plumb and level continuously. The last walls looked a lot better than the first one!

The “marine grade” plywood here is like cardboard, and I got ripped off (1/4" delivered when I ordered 3/8") so there was a little bit of bulging on both the foundation and the walls themselves. Lesson: brace heavily, with steel if you can get it. The 1x2" walers that I used on the wall framing were just barely adequate.

This will end up as a post-and-beam construction with poured cement in the gaps between walls and a bond beam around the top. I should really have included keyways on the wall edges, but again I’m just testing here to see what I can get away with.

Rammed earth takes a long time to cure and shrink to its final dimensions, so I’ll be doing the final concrete pour next month. I’ll add more photos when its done.

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#33

Tiny Micro Penis Living Taipei.