Today's Chinese sentence

[quote=“bob”]Here’s a start at today’s…

(Oops. My helper is sleeping it turns out so will have to finish tomorow. Sorry.)

Ni3 ying1gai2 shuisen dai4 ni3 de lu4yin1ji.

Deng1 ni3 xue2 dao4 xin1 de ju4zi shi lu4xia4 lai.

Guo yi zen zi huo nu hui4 you3 hen3 duo1 you3yong4 de ju4zi zai lu4yin1dai4 shang4.[/quote]

Bob, will you get just one sentence up today? My helper is no help. It has put a strain on the relationship by my asking for assistance with one sentence a day. Enough said.

As we discussed at the start I guess it’s just a matter of seeing if it starts becoming a habit. 365 sentences would be a valuable resource after one year and could be then put into a sequence such as asking for directions, time, eating etc that could form an additional resource for people lucky enough to find themselves arrived in Taiwan and seeking to learn without attending formal lessons. Wav files would be fantastic as well.

I have just been held back no end by the difference between mainland books and common local (Taiwan) use of the same language. And, most importantly my interpreter should get a new job.

[quote=“Ironman”]
Bob, will you get just one sentence up today? My helper is no help. It has put a strain on the relationship by my asking for assistance with one.[/quote]

Well, how come you don’t aks Mr. He???

I won’t blow a head gasket, if you mispronounce anything, and if you get tired of me, you can just go home.

Yeah, me too. BTW, in “Pimsleur’s Mandarin Chinese” they use a lot of mainland words and expressions, such as:
zhe4r (here)
na4r (there)
na3r (where)
yi1dian3r (a little)
yi1dian3r dong1xi (something)
guo4 yi1hui3r (later).

From what I can tell, in the case of zhe4r, na4r and na3r, the “er” ending is replaced with “li3”, and “yi1dian3r” becomes “yi1dian3dian” (?).
I’m not sure about the last two, though.
How do you say “something” and “later” in Taiwan?

If this is a bit off topic… I’ll try to make a sentence with those words. :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote]From what I can tell, in the case of zhe4r, na4r and na3r, the “er” ending is replaced with “li3”, and “yi1dian3r” becomes “yi1dian3dian” (?).
I’m not sure about the last two, though.
How do you say “something” and “later” in Taiwan? [/quote]

I found “mou3 wu4” for “something”. Don’t know how often or exactly where this word would be used.

I always say, “yi3 hou4” for “later” or “after”. I found, “geng4 chi2”. There are different ways to say it depending on what’s being said (context): “zhi1 hou4”, “hou4 lai2”, etc.

I think that “li3” is a prepostion like “in” or “at”

The differnces between Beijing Putonghua and Taiwan Guoyu are nore ones of pronounciation than anything else.

Honestly, I used both when studying, and it went ok.

A word is different here or there, the retroflex sounds are used more in Beijing than in Taipei, however nothing major.

sui2shen1 … lu4yin1ji1

you should follow body carry your recorder
You should carry your recorder on you (at all times)

I don’t understand the “shi” or the structure after ju4zi. I think ‘shi’ should be “jiu4”
wait you study arrive new sentence, just/then record down come
When you encounter a new sentence, you can record it.

Guo4 yi1 zhen4zi, ni3 hui4 you3…
cross a while you will have very many have use sentences at recorder atop
After a while, you’ll have many useful sentences on your tape.

Dragonbones you absolutely amaze me…

Thanks so much for that. It’s the kind of Chinese I need to learn because it is the kind of English I teach. I’ll read it aloud into my tape recorder for myself, and, come class time will read it aloud into my students tape recorder (in English and Chinese) along with the pauses, grunts, giggles, explanations, clarifications, corrections, conversations etc. that occur naturally. Some of my students love these tapes and the ones who do improve quickly. Again thanks so much. :notworthy:

Bob, dude, after 11 or 12 years of hard work and living here, it’s no big deal :wink: There are others here whose Chinese is much better than mine, to be sure! Anyway, glad to help.

Give yourself a few years, and you’ll be able to help others out in these threads too.

Jia1you2!
Add oil!
Too many translations to list; a few are
Go for it!
Go team!
Atta boy!
Keep it up!
Keep up the good work!

[quote=“Dragonbones”] Give yourself a few years, and you’ll be able to help others out in these threads too.

Jia1you2!
Add oil!
Too many translations to list; a few are
Go for it!
Go team!
Atta boy!
Keep it up!
Keep up the good work![/quote]

See, stuff like that, jia1you2 = add oil. I didn’t know that and I have been studying quite seriously, at least for the last few years or so. Prior to that my method involved smoking a lot of pot and, well, smoking a lot more pot I guess. Anyway, talking to people like you and Ironlady really does help to confirm this notion I have that one of the best things I can do for my English students is learn Chinese. It’s probably one of the best things I can do for myself as well. To keep the mind functional in old age and all I mean…

That is one of the few I picked up. Only because the locals always yell it at me when cranking up the tea field mountains on the mountain bike.

I sometimes yell back [quote]mei2you3 you2 m

[quote=“Ironman”]I sometimes yell back [quote]mei2you3 you2 m

I can see the tone marks just fine, including the third tone.
Maybe you don’t have the right fonts installed?

test

Tā t

[quote=“Ironman”]test

Tā t

Ironlady and I have been discussing the sentence and the forum. [color=red]Starting Monday 8th August Toasty will put up a sentence a day in a new thread he starts for one week then tag team it to another poster.[/color] Possibly Bob or Dragonbones if they agree then continue on to Andre, Mr He, j99l88e77, Truant, Nexus, rice-t, jiveturkey, funky monkey, Namahottie, Matchstickman, Frost, Puiwaihin and others who may be willing or even happy to take it on for a week then rotate again.

So.

  1. Weekly new thread. Thread heading next week by Toasty
    [color=red]Today’s Chinsese sentence. 8th-15th August Poster: Toasty.[/color]

  2. Toasty will follow [color=red]font size, color and format[/color] for one week.

  3. Toasty will [color=red]hand over to another poster[/color] and start the process again.

  4. If we can run this for a year then some of us could work together to sort (daily life, directions, food, travel etc) the daily sentence into a handy resource for new arrivals that can be used in conjunction with their Mainland oriented langauge books.

[quote][color=orange]Weekly thread heading will be this format:[/color] Today’s Chinsese sentence. 8th-15th August Poster: Toasty.

[color=red]
Monday 8th August 7:45am
[/color]

[color=blue]Write today’s sentence down and practise it through the day.[/color]

Note that each days sentence is taken from day to day Mandarin spoken in Taiwan and may not quite correspond with your Mandarin books.

[size=150][color=green]ran2hou4 mei3tian1 fu4xi2 jie2guo3 ni3 jin4bu4 hen3 kuai4.

r

This is better: Ran2hou4 mei3tian1 fu4xi2, ni3 jiu4 hui4 jin4bu4de hen3 kuai4. :wink:

The jie2guo3 seems more for the retelling of past events, e.g., ‘and as a result, x happened’, and is out of place here.

Sure, Anisll and I’d be happy to join the relay race.

[color=darkred]I’ll generally go along with pretty much anything if I know what it is. In this case I’m not so sure. I think what you are saying is that each of us (for one week each) will introduce a sentence a day related to a particular theme (which would be the title of the thread as well) and other posters can correct or add to those sentences as they see fit. Eventually the whole thing will be sorted out (useless posts floundered) and may serve as a good resource some day. Sounds good to me if I am understanding you here…[/color]

ni shuo sanmo. wo buhui jiang guoyu. deng ixia. yao xi yen keshi yen meiyou le. xuyao qu mai yen gen pijiou. yao jiuzui!

In that spirit I recorded a class with a 14 year old student today. Here’s how it went:

b - I want to record our conversationand then later type it into the computer and share it with many many people. So many many people can read, our class. Do you understand what I just said?

w - many many many people. hen duo ren?

b - yup. I’m going to, wo yao luyin burp* women de hua I have a hiccups hic* that’s a hiccup. cough* cough* That’s a cough. hiccup* That’s a hiccup.

w - yeah

b- I’m going to luyin womende hua, ranhou wo yao women ting dao women de hua, dazhi zai dian nao… share zhenme jiang share?
Uh, share fengxiang. Zhenme jiang share?

w - Share?

b - Yup. You can look it up in the dictionairy. S-h-a-r-e with many many people. If you were going to share your food with two people you’d uh

w - Ssuh?

b - s-h-a-r-e

(more, much more, later)

But before we get started on that I thought I’d share a vocab list I “finished” for my students today. You can use it in reverse if you like to study Chinese.

Movie Vocabulary
Here is a list of some of the words and expressions you might need if you want to study with movies and television programs. You will already know some of them but others will probably be new to you. Don