Traffic violations ... police crackdown

Oh, but not in Sanxia to my knowledge … window dressing again?

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003343163

[quote]NPA issues 15,000 tickets on first day of traffic crackdown
By Shelley Shan
STAFF REPORTER
Wednesday, Jan 03, 2007, Page 2

Yesterday the National Police Administration (NPA) reported that approximately 15,000 citations were issued on Monday – the first day of a crackdown on traffic violations. This represented a 12-fold increase on tickets issued on normal days.

Burned red lights accounted for over 90 percent of all reported violations – the majority of them reported in Taipei City as well as Taipei and Taoyuan counties.

“Old regulations did not discriminate between running through a red light and making an illegal right turn on a red light, leading many policemen to focus on illegal right turns rather than people running red lights,” NPA representative Ho Kuo-rong (何國榮) said.

“Since the policy has changed, police officers have begun focusing on drivers running red lights, which probably accounts for the surge in tickets,” Ho added.

Ho said that the new measures were simply “a necessary evil,” as traffic signals are the clearest indicators of right of way.

“And if you can’t make them stop at the red light, then you can’t make them follow other traffic regulations,” Ho added.[/quote]

Funny guy … ‘necessary evil’ … idiot

[quote]"…traffic signals are the clearest indicators of right of way."

“And if you can’t make them stop at the red light, then you can’t make them follow other traffic regulations,” Ho added.[/quote]Well, “necessary evil” was probably the wrong choice of words, but apart from that he’s got a very good point.

That always irritated the hell out of me, especially because turning right on a red (with proper pausing and yielding) is legal where I come from. This is a change for the better.

“Traffic violations, government earning spree” I think it should have read. Take their bloody licences away, more of them will stop driving like monkeys then. No, it’s just another age old session of on the spot small fines to keep the public thinking that something is being done, whilst the government and police departments rub their hands about fresh revenue.

yes, there’s a spot near my house where a huge number of people go through the red (it’s a T with a corner straight after it)… saw some cops parked just aroudn the corner out of view… they could see the | part of the T, so they knew if the scooter had turned, or run the red…

note that they are also cracking down on speeding~~ in 6 hours alone in taichung, they netted over 600 in taichung… while a 2 hour stint in nantou got 100 or so~ (was on the news)

before, the cops had to be visible and you had to be able to see they were set up for catching speeders… but supposedly a bill has now been passed allowing them to hide… i can see this causing protests, much like when people were complaining that some of the “speed camera ahead” signs were not 100% visible…

btw, does anybody know the legalities of radar detectors here??

I agree with you that they’re just doing it for the money… but taking away their licences won’t stop anything… they’ll just keep riding without one… I know a few people who have been riding for years, but have never even sat the licence test… and according to my wife, it’s fairly commonplace over here…

[quote=“x08”]
btw, does anybody know the legalities of radar detectors here??[/quote]

Yes, except in commercial vehicles, radar detectors are now legal here.

However, more and more police jurisdictions here are using laser to catch speeders.
And although laser detectors are legal too, with it’s beam so small and narrow they basically can only alert you to the fact that you can expect a ticket in the mail shortly. :s

[quote=“peanut”]Yes, except in commercial vehicles, radar detectors are now legal here.

However, more and more police jurisdictions here are using laser to catch speeders.
And although laser detectors are legal too, with it’s beam so small and narrow they basically can only alert you to the fact that you can expect a ticket in the mail shortly. :s[/quote]

thanks for that P~ was worried… always thought they were legal, as mine came free when i bought my car (brand new)… but someone was telling me today that they’re illegal… phew

Right turns on red are illegal here?

Does anybody else know this?

That always irritated the hell out of me, especially because turning right on a red (with proper pausing and yielding) is legal where I come from. This is a change for the better.[/quote]

Have they actually legalized right turns on red? It’s unclear from the content of the article. I hope so - that’s one rule that has pissed me off for ages. Wherever I’ve lived in the US, right turns on red are legal, and they should be legal here too.

Why? Care to back that up. If you want American laws go to America. Try using that legal defense in Québec when you turn right on a red light.

“turning right on a red light is now allowed everywhere in Quebec, except on the island of Montréal and at certain intersections. Where turning right on a red light is forbidden (due to heavy pedestrian traffic or lack of visibility at an intersection), signs have been put up to warn drivers. For more information, contact the Ministère des transports du Québec at (819) 772-3107.”
http://www.outaouais-tourism.ca/visit/useful_info_driving_e.asp

Well. Even they have changed it. :sunglasses:

But onto my point. There are now Ninja cops out there with “stealth guns” and expensive new cameras to watch your every transgression. So be more careful.[/url]

[quote=“TainanCowboy”]Right turns on red are illegal here?

Does anybody else know this?[/quote]

As it is in most developed countries in Europe …

I guess in the US they are legal in so far that you yield to traffic that is comming from the left … a thing that I don’t see happen in Taiwan …

[quote=“Chris”]Have they actually legalized right turns on red? It’s unclear from the content of the article. I hope so - that’s one rule that has pissed me off for ages. Wherever I’ve lived in the US, right turns on red are legal, and they should be legal here too.[/quote]What’s wrong with red meaning stop ? It does in virtually every other country. The roads here are dangerous enough thanks, no need to make them worse. Has anyone here actually tried walking outside ? And you want to let drivers go through red lights next to pedestrian crossings ? :loco:

To anyone who’s ever got a ticket: Aww… poor baby, next time try being more considerate, or not driving at all and reducing the amount of traffic.

No they shouldn’t. :wink:

It would endager pedestrians crossing the road and increase the chance of a turning car getting into an accident with those coming from the direction of the green light.

Well…in the US it is right turn on red
AFTER STOPPING
which may be a procedure totally beyond the ability of the majority of Taiwanese vehicle operators.

[quote=“Chicken”]

But onto my point. There are now Ninja cops out there with “stealth guns” and expensive new cameras to watch your every transgression. So be more careful.[/quote]

Yes … and they have a new system of checking on speed before they take your picture with their new Nikon and Sony video cams … they marked the road with two chalk lines and when you cross them faster then 3 counts you’re fined … :smiley:

the argument for right turns on reds can’t work here, simply for the fact that people aren’t taught to slow, look and yield to oncoming traffic. in fact, if people would do even one of the three, things would be a lot safer and i’d be more inclined to believe that the general populace could handle a law change.

until driving school progresses from a cash cow to a serious effort to educate people on how to drive in such a manner as to take others on the road into consideration, i don’t hold much hope.

Why? Care to back that up. [/quote]

What’s to ‘back up’? :loco: It’s an opinion. One doesn’t back up opinions, one just ‘has’ them. :stuck_out_tongue:

And I agree with Chris on this. Turning right on red (with an appropriate stop, look and yield process) works just fine, as it is a form of traffic merging. Of course the yielding is an integral part of it, and I doubt most drivers would yield here, but then they should be ticketed for that, rather than for turning on a red per se.

It’s not reasonable to demand someone leave the country for proposing an improvement. :raspberry:

I’m not breaking the law and then using American laws as a defense. I’m arguing that I like the American law better; the Taiwanese law is extremely inconvenient.

Xtrain -
And therein is the trouble. It still, after almost 3 years, causes me concern to see a speeding scooter coming from my right on a cross-street and knowing that it will 1) not stop and then enter the road I’m on
2) blindly turn into the path of my scooter
3) arrogantly expect me to compensate for their complete disregard for my safety, traffic safety and their own safety.
Most of these are either 16 - 25 or so xiao jies or 50+ yr old women who couldn’t give a rats patootie about anything but themselves.
I have been broadsided 3 times by these road vermin. I had nowhere to swerve to as the road to my left was occupied by other persons/vehicles. Fortunately, for me, I was unhurt in these incidents.
I learned quickly that a straight leg out to their front tire or a back-fist to their helmet (yes, I have done this) will help them understand that such dangerous behavior should not be done.
And frankly, I do not like to swat these ignorant twits. But its a matter of personal survival and I value my life more than theirs. Thats the facts. Its their causing, not mine.

I think and in my humble opinion an opinion should be prefaced with a phrase of self repudiation such as " I think", or “IMHO”. I thought an loquacious computer genius such as yourself would be cognizant of this fact.

This is not Canada, or Europe, or even America. Drivers here can not or will not give right of way to pedestrians, people driving straight (when they want to turn left or right) or even someone walking on a sidewalk.