US perception of UK eating habits; blood and guts?

But, I didn’t eat the salmon Mousse…

Chou

A vest would also be nice…or maybe a fez.

Aaargh! Suddenly homesick and hungry.
I always take a couple of pork sausages and cut them into about 3 strips, toss them in the pan until they’re nice and brown. Then toss in the baked beans for a bit just to heat them up. Then comes the egg, fried for a few seconds in the mush that still remains in the pan.
Put all of this on toast with the egg on top, sunny-side up so when I cut into the bright yellow yolk all that lovely goo runs out and smothers my delicious meal.
Followed by some fresh creamy cow’s milk from the neighbour’s farm.
Yum!

[quote=“twonavels”]
I always take a couple of pork sausages and cut them into about 3 strips, toss them in the pan until they’re nice and brown. Then toss in the baked beans for a bit just to heat them up. Then comes the egg, fried for a few seconds in the mush that still remains in the pan.
Put all of this on toast with the egg on top, sunny-side up so when I cut into the bright yellow yolk all that lovely goo runs out and smothers my delicious meal.[/quote]

Well! :shock: There went my lunch all over the keyboard. Thanks alot! :laughing:

Time to brush up on your marksmanship, then! :mrgreen:

To address the original question, I guess I’ve always figured that the Brits subsisted on a combination of (a) food that’s been boiled to death, (b) food that’s drowning in grease, and © food with, uh, interesting names.

Not as bad as the situation in Russia, where they had to subsist on either dirt or lard (there’s actually a regional dish which is nothing more than a chunk of pork fat, called “salo” – as a joke, a chocolate company put out a “chocolate-covered salo bar” a few years ago).

Baked beans make me retch … even more than rhubarb and custard.

In primary school, I often had to sit through lessons in the afternoon with a plate of rhubarb in front of me because nothing on earth would persuade me to eat it when it was dished up for school lunch.

What they need is really good donuts.

Just heard some great news for donut-deprived Britain.

Krispy Kremes are heading to Britain. Those incredibly delicious doughnuts will make their debut at Harrods department store in the fall.

In the name of good relations, what other fabulous products should America share with the Brits?

[quote=“Larsen Ni”]What they need is really good donuts.

Just heard some great news for donut-deprived Britain.

Krispy Kremes are heading to Britain. Those incredibly delicious doughnuts will make their debut at Harrods department store in the fall.

In the name of good relations, what other fabulous products should America share with the Brits?[/quote]

Good doughnuts are both available and spelt correctly in Britain.

[quote=“Larsen Ni”]

In the name of good relations, what other fabulous products should America share with the Brits?[/quote]

Taco Bell. But how about if Britain shares some of its Marmite with the US in exchange? I go through jars and jars of it–my fellow Americans have no idea what they are missing.

[quote=“hexuan”]
Good doughnuts are both available and spelt correctly in Britain.[/quote]

Donuts/doughnuts are American, thank you very much. And our donuts are inspected daily by the police! Stick to your Spotted Dicks. :laughing: Thpppppppppp!

mrbreakfast.com/article.asp?articleid=8

krispykreme.com/

britain needs an in-and-out. hell, new york needs an in-an-out.

in-and-out, in-and-out, that’s what a hamburger’s all about. :smiley:

honestly, britain would not be at the top of my “eat weird animal parts” list. the french would take that prize. one day i might try the dish where they roll up a sheep’s face or something. eastern euros are also good about utilizing animals better. british food is just thought of as boring for the most part.

i like steak and kidney pies, but jellied eel i can’t get into.

[quote=“blueface666”][quote=“hexuan”]
Good doughnuts are both available and spelt correctly in Britain.[/quote]

Donuts/doughnuts are American, thank you very much. And our donuts are inspected daily by the police! Stick to your Spotted Dicks. :laughing: Thpppppppppp!

mrbreakfast.com/article.asp?articleid=8

krispykreme.com/[/quote]

American troops brought flapjacks, hashbrowns, and doughnuts to Northern Ireland during the Second World War. My Granny used to make great doughnuts.

Grannies are always the best cooks. :slight_smile:

I reckon ya’ll never got any hushpuppies in UK. Poor sods.

Btw, blueface, that recipe sits there on my fridge and I’ve yet to have the grease temptation to make them. Why don’ t you make me a batch? :wink:

[quote=“fredericka bimmel”]I reckon ya’ll never got any hushpuppies in UK. Poor sods.

Btw, blueface, that recipe sits there on my fridge and I’ve yet to have the grease temptation to make them. Why don’ t you make me a batch? ;-)[/quote]

If you fry us up a mess of fish, you’re on. :smiley:

[quote=“blueface666”][quote=“fredericka bimmel”]I reckon ya’ll never got any hushpuppies in UK. Poor sods.

Btw, blueface, that recipe sits there on my fridge and I’ve yet to have the grease temptation to make them. Why don’ t you make me a batch? ;-)[/quote]

If you fry us up a mess of fish, you’re on. :smiley:[/quote]

Can you even get catfish in Taiwan? I’ve never seen it here.

How else would you advocate cooking peas, carrots, potatoes? A few minutes in hot water leaves my veggies tasting healthy and apparently doing me some good. Are you suggesting I should bake my peas in the oven? Toast my carrots? Or do you just want everything fried? Yum yum, that’s so healthy. At least British chips are made from slices of potato instead of from extruded potato mulch. (Apologies to In&Out for the gross libel there.)

Hmmmm, chip butties with the butter mingling with the HP sauce and running down your hand.

Boiled potato, carrot, beef? Oh, you mean Irish stew? Yeah, I like that, but we can do better yet.

Chicken Tikka Masala. Traditional English Fayre, although I didn’t eat much of it as a kid. We seemed to eat mostly chow mein, chop suey, the occasional pizza. Or mum would cook baked alaska, spaghetti (yikes, she boiled that. did she do something wrong?) a sunday roast with roast potatoes. Oh god, roast potatoes. Gravy! Turkey with chestnut stuffing, salmon mousse. Lamb with mint sauce.

Ritz crackers. Chocolate hobnobs. Beef and guinness pie. Cornish pasties, in fact anything with pastry - a lost art in the USA. And what have you got for cheese? We got cheese that has flavour, served with pickled onions. (What the hell is dill pickle, anyway?)

Red Leicester
Caerphilly
Red Windsor
Stilton
White Stilton
Lancashire
Double Goucester
Cheshire
Dorset Bluveny
Wensleydale
Cheddar
Illchester

to name but a few, with the help of those madcap chaps who also brought you the spam sketch. Oh yes, spam. Where did that come from? Wasn’t bloody England was it? Try driving across America before you criticise Brit food. You want to bitch about bland unhealthy crap go eat with the porkers in the USA.

Good food is available in most developed nations. Many people choose not to eat it. Any nation where Dennys can remain profitable can not possibly criticise the eating habits of another, except maybe Germany. Yeah, let’s talk about German food.

Ever been to a Dutch restaurant outside of Holland? There’s a reason. Eeeeeeeeyuuuuuuukkkkkkk!

Or traditional Czech food where they heap glops of potatos, red cabbage and white cabbage, with every dish. Reminds me of my mom’s cooking:
Toss some dried onion flakes on top of some pig flesh. Whip out a can of campbell’s mushroom soup and pour on the flesh. Boil some cabbage and potatoes. Voila~! Dinnertime.

I always used to tell my British flatmate that we didn’t fight the American Revolution over the Stamp Act…it was the only way we could break away and get a decent meal. :laughing: