USA and gun control


#1003

But I thought the European population was aging.


#1004

Germany’s certainly is.
Only reason the UK and US populations are not is due to very open legal immigration policies that keep their populations not turning into Japan or Taiwan in terms of aging.


#1005

Geez, you’d never want to end up in a situation like Taiwan and Japan, probably two of the three best places to live in the whole Asia.


#1006

The point is NOT whether London actually has a bigger youth population than New York .

The point IS that a factor such as this and many others factors need to be researched before anybody shoots their mouth off about stuff they don’t understand. It took me all of two minutes googling to understand the relative gun law in New York and knife law in London.
I also checked the date the stats were relevant for (all of two months ).

#makeafuckingeffort
#readbooks

If you just quote random shit lumped together like that idiot Trump operates in Twitter don’t expect not to be called out for it .

Again.

#readbooks


#1007

Germany has a baby-boom now.


#1008

Taiwan is such a good place to live that 75% of under 35 year old Taiwanese make less than 40,000 ntd a month and the country is under constant and growing threat from China and has severe pollution problems and very crowded living conditions and fairly poor education system. Its not that great to be honest and I’m a long-termer here.


#1009

a Muslim baby boom. Yes.


#1010

Yeah sucks for you lol. Really crawling out of the woodwork.


#1011

4 posts were split to a new topic: From the US gun control thread


#1012

sorry gun grabbers. more guns, the better.

Prosecutors revealed Wednesday that the man who carried out a deadly mass shooting at an Orlando, Fla., nightclub in 2016 originally planned to strike Disney World.

Prosecutors alleged that the man, Omar Mateen, had intended to open fire at Disney Springs, a shopping and entertainment area, but was deterred from doing so after seeing police officers, NBC News reported.


#1013

Not happening. Unless the democrats want to continue shooting themselves in the foot so to speak.


#1014

I guess as people keep using the UK as an example … I get the point of reducing the availability of some weapons but do we ban knives in the UK ? Where does it end? Dismal future::persevere:


#1015

Many knives are banned in the UK.
Carrying knives without a good reason is also a criminal offence.

Also as discussed previously there are many factors that come into play when looking at murder rates.


#1016

Wow. The trend has been down in NYC for a long time. 2017 was the lowest number since 1959, 290. That’s a rate a lot of other US cities would like to have.


#1017

I know…but banning them has obviously made utterly no difference to their use in crime.
I appreciate it is not a weapon capable of killing 50 people but I still can’t help feeling that it’s not the type of weapon, but the users , that need to be looked at .


#1018

So are flamethrowers and grenades okay then Shiadoa?


#1019

Stats don’t work like that.
How do you know banning them hadn’t reduced their usage compared to not banning them ?
You’d need to look at a lot of factors

  • control study
  • single or multiple knife assaults
  • youth population
  • policing
  • community engagement
  • economic factors
    -justice system

Its perfectly possible that banning knives has been effective in and of itself to bring down the headline rate of knife crime from what it could have been, all other factors considered.

Also, need to check the period of stats being compared. That comparison of NYC vs LDN was just for two or three months!


#1020

Bit of a Strawman point TG. Legislation exists to prevent building or owning weapons like that…just as fully automatic weapons are banned already. People in the US will always be able to get hold of a “gun” due to the sheer numbers in circulation, like knives in the UK . You know , I am sure , that it is probable many of the shooters would have found a way to kill. Reducing the probability, by making it a bit harder to get certain weapons may help , but it will not stop 50 % of these attacks.
I will say , I do think more controls are sensible…I will also say that if my children were at a US school, in the present climate, I would prefer to have more security measures at that school, than wait for Politicians to agree on any measures. Preventing the shooters now, is what i feel, is the issue. Not ideal but my opinion if I had children in the US right now.


#1021

I don’t think so. You said, “it’s not the type of weapon, but the users , that need to be looked at”. So why only those two types of weapon then? What sets “knives” and “semi-automatic rifles” apart from other types of weapon? Why should we be equally concerned about “knives” and “assault weapons”, but not “flamethrowers”?

I keep saying this, but this is 2018, let’s multitask. Do what we can to prevent shooters, yes, not saying no, but let’s also make it harder or impossible to acquire excessively dangerous weapons, just as is already done with other classes of excessively dangerous weapons.


#1022

Yes , Stats can be used in many ways , I know and accept that ,but the Met figures have not reduced …even going back further.
This last period seems to be a spike.
Since then however gun-enabled crime has increased 67% across London with 3,309 offences being recorded in the 12 months to November 2009.

Crime rate 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008–09 2009–10
Knife-enabled crime[39] 10305 12985 12367 12301 10699 12345 12611
Rate per 10,000 London 13.7 17.3 16.5 16.4 14.3 16.4 16.8
Knife-enabled crime figures are available from 2003 to 2007 and more recently monthly knife crime summaries are provided on the Metropolitan Police website showing financial year to date figures.[40]

but I accept that it may have been far worse without any control

One BBC theory is the following , which may have been a factor , but it’s not proven.
Among possible explanations for the recent increase in knife crime is a steep decline in the use by police of stop and search.

The powers enable officers to search people on the street if they have reasonable grounds to suspect they may be carrying weapons, illegal drugs, stolen property or items to be used to commit a crime. People can also be searched without reasonable grounds if a senior officer believes there’s a risk of serious violence in a particular area.

From 2009 the number of stops has been falling across England and Wales, especially in London, primarily due to concerns that the measures unfairly targeted young black men, wasted police resources and were ineffective at catching criminals.

Theresa May, as Home Secretary, led efforts to drive down the number of stops, but there’s anecdotal evidence from police that young people are now more inclined to carry knives because of growing confidence they won’t be stopped.

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