Wanting to Teach in Taiwan, NEED HELP and I have questions! I do not have a Bachelors but an AA

Hello, forgive me if this has not already been asked or stated so many times but I request on-point information pertaining to working in Taiwan as a teacher

[ul]1) I DO NOT have a 4 year degree or BA but I DO have an Associates Degree at an accredited community college.

  1. I HAVE taught in a daycare for 5 years.

  2. I PLAN to take the TEFL course but am curious as to what I need to know first (hence, why I am posting here) in order to consider being qualified to work as a teacher there.

  3. I have been an ESL tutor before.[/ul]

With all these factors in mind, would I still be able to work as a teacher in Taiwan?

I’m a forgiving soul.

Your “accredited community college” has to be accepted by the Taiwanese Ministry of Education. Contact your nearest Taiwanese Economic and Cultural Office first to check this.

Once you have your TEFL certificate you will be able to be approved to teach English in Taiwan. This is assuming you can find an employer who is happy with your qualifications and experience.

In order to obtain a work permit from the government, and thus work legally, the minimum education required is an AA plus TEFL certification (“college diploma” plus “certificates for language teaching” as specified by the Council of Labor Affairs). A TEFL certificate is not required if you have a Bachelors degree.

A school itself may require more.

Irrelevant for getting a work permit, and most likely irrelevant to the buxiban. However, may be highly useful to you for keeping your sanity in the classroom.

For practical purposes I would recommend taking a course with a teaching practicum in a brick-and-mortar setting, as opposed to an online course. It’s better to swim with the sharks first before blindly diving in. :2cents:

See number 2.

EDIT: Yep, everything tomthorne said above :bow:

God/Science/Whatever Is Holy Bless ALL OF YOU. SERIOUSLY ALL CAPS IS NEEDED TO EXPRESS MY SINCEREST APPRECIATION.

I am a 26 year old man and I cried today because a lot of my future is riding on this opportunity. I literally had a panic attack.

So what I am getting is…

  1. Take TEFL in the classroom.
  2. Make sure to certify your AA before you make any sudden moves.

Seriously, again, thank you guys. You made a difference to a person. No it’s not cheesy, it’s fact.

Does it have to be a University? Will as simple Community College suffice?

Man…

Some more info here:

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtop … 11&p=63822

I know someone posted a list of approved educational institutions recently, looking for it.

Here, there’s a list of approved US institutions here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/country.php?continent_id=6

Online degrees are generally a no-no.

[quote=“Tempo Gain”]Some more info here:

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtop … 11&p=63822

I know someone posted a list of approved educational institutions recently, looking for it.

Here, there’s a list of approved US institutions here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/country.php?continent_id=6

Online degrees are generally a no-no.[/quote]

OMG, that list is seriously comprehensive. I was going to post a reply that it in no way can be…but my schools, which no one in their right mind would have ever heard of, are on that list. Thanks for posting!

It should also be noted that while possible, it may not be probable. You are going to be really putting yourself in a very strong position of weakness. Best of luck.

If you’re North American (and white :s ), I know Gloria takes on teachers with an Associate’s and a TEFL.

I know teachers who are working here on an AA+TEFL, so all is not lost. Community College is fine, as long as it’s on the list that Tempo Gain provided.

As timmyjames noted, with less than a bachelors degree it may be more of a struggle to land a job, at least a half-way decent one. There are plenty of buxibans here, so you just need to hit the pavement and apply at all of them until you find a gig.

And, as much as I hate to admit, having a white face (and the energy to act like a clown) will help offset the lack of a bachelors degree.

Most schools I have found that have trouble hiring people with an AA and TEFL tend to just not know the laws.

There are some buxibans that have that corporate rule. But most schools will be ok with it.

[quote=“Tempo Gain”]Some more info here:

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtop … 11&p=63822

I know someone posted a list of approved educational institutions recently, looking for it.

Here, there’s a list of approved US institutions here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/country.php?continent_id=6

[color=#FF0000]Online degrees are generally a no-no.[/color][/quote]

This is simply not true. If you look at the list of approved schools, you can find dozens of online universities and colleges. Liberty University, Phoenix University are two as an example. These online schools are hit and miss, of course, when it comes to quality of education. However, a lot show up on Taiwan’s list of approved schools.

[quote=“Quarters”][quote=“Tempo Gain”]Some more info here:

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtop … 11&p=63822

I know someone posted a list of approved educational institutions recently, looking for it.

Here, there’s a list of approved US institutions here:

fsedu.moe.gov.tw/country.php?continent_id=6

[color=#FF0000]Online degrees are generally a no-no.[/color][/quote]

This is simply not true. If you look at the list of approved schools, you can find dozens of online universities and colleges. Liberty University, Phoenix University are two as an example. These online schools are hit and miss, of course, when it comes to quality of education. However, a lot show up on Taiwan’s list of approved schools.[/quote]

True/not true. I think these are overly stong terms to use in Taiwan. Somewhere on the spectrum of trueness might be better.

TG’s use of the word “generally” is preferable, IMO. For example, at the uni I work at a guy was just turned down because his post grad qualification was online. He took it in Taiwan and they could see from his passport that he wasn’t in the US when he took it. On the other hand, if someone took an online qualification in the US while living there then there would be no way, AFAIK, for anyone to know it was online - short of contacting the institution itself. The MOE doesn’t like online qualifications and generally tries to sift them out and refuse them. Again, this is only AFAIK and I could be wrong - or somewhere on the spectrum of wrongness.

Liberty and Phoenix are not 100% online universities. There are on campus options, no?

Hmmm. I’ve heard many reports that people with degrees showing “online” have problems. It may be that I’m getting degrees mixed up with the TESL certificates that would be required here. Thanks for pointing this out, I’ll take a look at it.

Most “online” programs do not have “online” printed on the diploma. Other than cross checking the dates of study with the dates of residing in Taiwan, there is pretty much no way for anyone to distinguish if the diploma was earned online or offline.

I would think it not a problem presenting your diploma to NIA or FAO to get your work based ARC if the institution the diploma was earned from was on their list of approved institutions. However, I think the previous poster was correct in saying hybrid schools may be different. For example, Walden University is purely online with no brick and mortar location and it is not on the list of approved institutions. So, perhaps hybrib schools (offering both on location and online courses) are on the list because of their brick and mortar status. Just my own speculation.