Warning Book about American Society "Bright Sided" Chinese Version Appearing in Libraries

Bright-sided
How Positive Thinking is Undermining America
A sharp-witted knockdown of America’s love affair with positive thinking and an urgent call for a new commitment to realism…
barbaraehrenreich.com/brightsided.htm

This book has just come out, or at least in my village it appears on the “new book” rack in my library. I just started listening to this book and it has some great arguments but I wonder how the average Chinese would interpret this?

Over the years I’ve had some pretty strange assumptions about American life, etc that border on illogical from people who should know better. (PHD students in English literature etc… ) You can count the amount of people in my village who left Taiwan to study on one hand and the amount of people who actually got out of the the library and experienced culture is even less.

Just curious how the locals would get out of this book. It is really sarcastic in a lot of ways. That’s my kind of humor but I don’t think there is the art of sarcasm in Chinese. I wonder if it would be translated well.

Has Oprah put it on her must-read list?

That’s how I decide what to read.

[quote=“zender”]Has Oprah put it on her must-read list?

That’s how I decide what to read.[/quote]

I see what you did there .

I just finished the book. It is actually great! It’s Anti Secret!, Anti Opera! Anti-Group Think.

But I really want to know how it is translated in Chinese. And what the Chinese/Taiwanese think about it.

Remember, our world and logic is not exactly the same as the locals. Just see the many posts on things like electrical safety, driving and what not…

Just a refresher… I want a new digital antenna. We have a great discussion. Next I ask where the lightning arrestors are… and (blink… blink) ?
Hmm… my wires to my kitchen seem a little thin… Should I up grade them… Outlet fire… electrician puts in a new plug exactly like the old one. Read this book. Read the Chinese version if you can. Get their opinions… I want to know…

Well, you kinda have to balance positive thinking and reality. It’s foolish to act and not consider possible negative consequences but if you focus on negative consequences you will never do anything because you’re afraid of risk.

As for the attitude on safety I don’t know. I don’t like it but at the same time people here aren’t so paranoid, because that’s how it is in America. You have greater freedom here to act yet there are fewer safety nets.

This sentence deserves one hundred thumbs up.

Oh, please.
Reality is far too fullsome. I’m all for the positive, but there is the grinding dull edge of negativity to be grudgingly accepted.
Deny it at one’s peril, but the basic nature of an atom surely dictates that one takes, and uses, both of the positive and the negative.

It’s a well-recognized phenomenon in human psychology that we all distort reality through hundreds of cognitive biases. This is not just an American thing. I recommend Daniel Kahneman’s book, of which Chinese version also appeared in Taiwan’s bookstores lately. The book is called “Thinking, Fast and Slow”. The guy’s considered one of the most influential psychologists alive today (he also won a Nobel prize in economics).

One of the most fascinating biases IMO is the “illusion of superiority” bias saying that most mentally healthy people tend to see themselves better good looking and smarter than the average (a statistical impossibility) and that depressed people are much more realistic in their assessment of themselves (depressive realism) and of the world (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illusory_superiority).

Again, I highly recommend Kahneman’s book, it was one of the most fascinating books I have ever read.

[quote=“mjopp”]It’s a well-recognized phenomenon in human psychology that we all distort reality through hundreds of cognitive biases. This is not just an American thing. I recommend Daniel Kahneman’s book, of which Chinese version also appeared in Taiwan’s bookstores lately. The book is called “Thinking, Fast and Slow”. The guy’s considered one of the most influential psychologists alive today (he also won a Nobel prize in economics).

One of the most fascinating biases IMO is the “illusion of superiority” bias saying that most mentally healthy people tend to see themselves better good looking and smarter than the average (a statistical impossibility) and that depressed people are much more realistic in their assessment of themselves (depressive realism) and of the world (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illusory_superiority).

Again, I highly recommend Kahneman’s book, it was one of the most fascinating books I have ever read.[/quote]

Thanks for the information.

[quote=“mjopp”]It’s a well-recognized phenomenon in human psychology that we all distort reality through hundreds of cognitive biases. This is not just an American thing. I recommend Daniel Kahneman’s book, of which Chinese version also appeared in Taiwan’s bookstores lately. The book is called “Thinking, Fast and Slow”. The guy’s considered one of the most influential psychologists alive today (he also won a Nobel prize in economics).

One of the most fascinating biases IMO is the “illusion of superiority” bias saying that most mentally healthy people tend to see themselves better good looking and smarter than the average (a statistical impossibility) and that depressed people are much more realistic in their assessment of themselves (depressive realism) and of the world (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illusory_superiority).

Again, I highly recommend Kahneman’s book, it was one of the most fascinating books I have ever read.[/quote]

I couldn’t read that book, it’s far too depressing.

I’m still beautiful, though, as a result.

What does it all matter, the universe is unstable anyway.