Went shopping for big bikes yesterday

Something funny/interesting that happened was I noticed a CBR 600 F4i, which is a less sporty, less expensive, older version of my last bike, the CBR 600RR.

So I think to myself…maybe, this would be a smarter choice…something my girlfriend could ride on more comfortably.

The 600RR: powersports.honda.com/motorcycle … =CBR600RR5

The 600F4i: powersports.honda.com/motorcycle … =CBR600F46

Notice the prices. The 600F is 500 American cheaper. And considering bikes here cost double…that should be 1000 cheaper, about 30,000nt cheaper.

In actuality, the 600F4i is about 30,000 more expensive! I asked why and the shop guy told me because they sell so few of them. So the less they order in, the more expensive the costs. Crazy.

Oh, and the nicest bike they had was this baby: Aprillia 1000R Factory

The Aprillia was selling for 1 million nt.

It looks nice.

I know you swear by Hondas but have you thought about getting a test ride on one of those Kawasaki Z750s that Plasmatron recommends? You never know, you might really like it.

[quote=“joesax”]It looks nice.

I know you swear by Hondas but have you thought about getting a test ride on one of those Kawasaki Z750s that Plasmatron recommends? You never know, you might really like it.[/quote]

Yeah…they do look nice. Maybe if there was a good price on one.

I’d say the chance of a Honda breaking in a unexpected way is maybe 5%…and I’d say for most other bikes it’s gotta be higher (or people wouldn’t make such a big fuss about Honda Build Quality all the time) so maybe 8%… I’d rather not take the risk. Honda sells 52% of all bikes, second is Yamaha…third…I’d guess is Suzuki.

So that makes me real leery about buying a Kawasaki…even though many people say good things about them. Don’t want to start a flame war here…I know lots of guys on here like Kawasaki…but when I read things like:

He owned 5 Hondas and not one out of the ordinary mechanical problem. He talks about other things breaking on each of his Kwaks.

in fairness to Kawasaki the ZRX12 was designed and engineered somewhere in the dark ages, so if you were to compare how a circa 1999-2000 Honda Hornet for example, compared to the ZRX you’d get a more accurate picture… Like hm said before many of us have owned Kwaks for years without any issues and even more important than that is the 180degree turn around in Kawasaki’s design and engineering that took Kwak’s old and frankly speaking quite antiquated line-up of bikes like the ZRX12 and the ZR7 and replaced them with the all new fleet of things like the Z1000, ZX-10R, ZX636R etc.

Lastly it’s important to realise that the term “build quality” does not mean “reliability”… when bike journalists refer to build quality what they are talking about is the things like the quality of bolts/fasterns used, the quality of the paint work, the fit and finish of the hand control clusters, the quality of castings in the engine, quality of welds on the frame, the quality of the wiring loom, the footpegs, etc. to name a few random examples… basically the general level of fit, finishing and refinement… so while it is true that Honda engines are very reliable, perhaps the most reliable, when bike journalists refer to Honda build quality they mean just that, the build quality…

BUT the Achilies heel of Honda in Taiwan has nothing to do with reliability or build quality, or whether or not it breaks down more or less than other bikes, it’s having nowhere to do standard servicing that ALL bikes must have done every X thousand km’s even if they are operating flawlessly…

On the topic of Kwaks:

I read a magazine article where they reviewd the new ZX600RR (Kawasaki). They said lots of great things about it. They also mentioned that the slipper clutch broke…during their test drive.

And with reference to the above quote…his 2004 or 2005 bike was the ZX-10R…and it’s transmission jammed while he was riding it. Locking up the rear tire…and sending him flying off the bike.

It’s just little things like that…that I read and hear about that put me off. I KNOW there are lots of problem free kwaks on the road…and I know there are some hondas with problems. But it just seems from my experience that you have a better chance of getting a lemon bike with Kawasaki…that’s all.

Just to clarify. I had a gas gauge problem on the ZRX 1200, and a seized clutch on the ZX10R. But again, I would still recommend Kawasaki for their engines. There are still many old Kawakers like the K1000 from the early 80’s that are still running fine. But I won’t buy one in Taiwan.

[quote=“joesax”]It looks nice.

I know you swear by Hondas but have you thought about getting a test ride on one of those Kawasaki Z750s that Plasmatron recommends? You never know, you might really like it.[/quote]

Funny thing. Just the other day I take my 50cc scooter in to buy a new basket for it (I’m crAzY liKe that!). Anyway what do I see in the scooter mod shop? A Z750S…

Once my new dog saw I was taking pictures she hopped up without being asked…

Seems that this scooter mod shop is now an official KAWASAKI dealership… :unamused: …evidently you just need to ask to become one…as well as invest a certain amount of money.

But I really like the guys who work there and they can do (or attempt to do) warranty work. I can also get financing through them…etc. And there is no other shop I’d rather give my money to. They told me 360k for the Z750S.

That’s 40 less than I paid for my CBR…and I’ve already saved up a deposit twice as big as I put down on the CBR. Tempting…

Cool to see more shops becoming official dealers…but it looks a little cluttered in that shop…is it one of those shops that never clean up boxes and just keep everything!..

It would be nice for Kawasaki to demand a certain level of presentation and professionalism from their franchise dealerships…God knows how hard it was for BMW to make that happen, so I would think that Kawasaki is a ways off on that!

There lies the problem. Any one with some money and connections can become an official Kawasaki dealer in Taiwan, even scooter shops. WTF! Don’t they need any proper certification or training? Would you really trust them to do any major work on your technologically advance bike, even if it is under warranty? I wonder if the big wigs of Kawasaki Japan know that there sister company in Taiwan is selling their licenses to any hack shop that offers the highest bid, and in the process hurting their image as a whole.

guys

settle down…we have no idea what the store above looks like, how its run, how trained they are etc. lets see what mordeth says before we go off like this.

[quote=“AWOL”]guys

settle down…we have no idea what the store above looks like, how its run, how trained they are etc. lets see what mordeth says before we go off like this.[/quote]

:slight_smile: Nice of you to stick up for the little guy AWOL…but I’m sorry to say that motorcyclerider is correct. They aren’t even a scooter shop…they sell mods for scooters and biking accessories (Arai, Dainese…etc.). They have one fairly competent mechanic…but he is self taught and never studied in anything.

ah well…

sure having loads of dealerships means that the majority will be incompetant, but it also has the advantage of offering leverage… “what’s that, your price is firm?, you’re not offering any extras?.. not what the other 3 Kwak dealers in town told me…bye…” plus you dont have to take your bike to the dealer you bought it from… my Z1000 never once went back to the dealer after I rode it out the day I bought it, I did all servicing, maintenance, tire changes etc myself at a mate’s shop… the other day I met someone who is in the big bike business and they said “oh… you’re the foreigner who bought a big Kawasaki and never came back!.. nobody does that!..” :laughing:

the reason why Kwak dealers are dime a dozen are because the owner of the Kawasaki Taiwan “franchise” is non other than our old incompetant friends Kymco… they offer a Kwak dealer package to any and all of their Kymco scooter dealers, for a price… same shitty service and technical knowledge, nice shiny Japanese brand… caveat emptor choose your service dealer carefully…

It was easy to spot what kind of shop it was…just by seeing the boxes behind the bike and all the clutter on the floor!

really? all could make out through the blurred pic was it was in the window of a shop.

On MinZu Road near the domestic airport I noticed 2 big bike specfic shops. One was larger than the other and looked to stock a nice cross section of stuff.

Head north on FuXing N Road all the way up to the airport, turn left on MinZu (only option). The 1st shop is right near the intersection of MinZu and FuXing, opposite the airport. The other is a little way down closer to the seafood market.