Western Border Trail (1904)

Found this interesting link a while back and have been trying to piece together how much of the original trail still exists. The northern part of trail seems fairly straight forward, as the sections from Jiajiouliao - Xiong Kong, and Wuliaojian - Ximenshan are well traveled. However, after Ximen the path south disappears. Is there a trail that follows the foothills north/south from Ximen through Hsinchu? How about the foothills further south?

Edit: The site won’t allow me to link directly to the old fort map, so you’ll have to click on E-Map at the top of the page.
gissrv3.sinica.edu.tw/search_en/

(Taipei County) > Jiajiouliao - Xiong Kong - Couhe - Wuliaojian (Taoyuan County) Jinmianshan - Baishihshan - Sijoushan -Ximenshan (Hsinchu County) …Neiwan… .

I don’t know the exact route (the link didn’t reach any clearly shown trail on the map), but if you do, probably the set of 6 maps Sun River put out tracing a course through the lower western hills of The Central Mountain Range from Taipei County to PingTung county might be worth perusing. Whatever paths are marked on there that overlap the old route you are researching will provide some answers. Of course, not every marked path is a regularly hiked trail!

Thanks for the reply. I’ve been using a combination of Sun River’s Formosa Road Atlas and online GPS maps as my primary means of navigation. I was under the impression the hiking series was basically the same as the atlas. Are there any significant differences between these products?

I don’t have the Sun River Road Atlas, but I do have the series put out by Outdoor Life a few years ago. Although it doesn’t mark every trail, it does include a lot and being a road map it covers the entire county area. I bought them because I wanted to do some things west of Ali Shan and other places not covered by the Sun River maps.

Perhaps the Sun River Road Atlas is sufficient if it’s as thorough as their maps.

The road atlas and the trail maps are not the same. The latter are far more detailed. The road maps simply don’t show a lot of the trail systems.