What a beautiful country we live in!

some random snaps from earlier today…


I couldn’t agree with you more. Many people dwell on the negatives but I am blown away by the natural beauty every time I visit. Looks like you were over on the east coast? My wife and I want to build a bed and breakfast on the east coast someday.

Here’s a link to some pics I took around the island on the last trip:

timeasterday.netfirms.com/TaiwanPictures.htm

I find it amazing to see how silmilar it is to the west coast in NZ.(south island)

Yeah I agree but shhhh don’t tell anyone about that. When we were driving along the coast yesterday it was really windy and a little bit drizzly at one stage - I found it really odd that when I stopped the car and got out, I was expecting it to be bone chilling like the West Coast of NZ, but it was around 30deg!! Weird.
It takes AGES to drive the 250 or so kms to Hualien…man…40-50km speed limits the whole way…grrr.

Even though it’s tiny, I like the austere windswept beauty of Green Island.

:smiling_imp:

That picture says it all.

Without the dirty litter bugs, Taiwan would be difficult to top.

Beautiful pictures!

Is that the road to/from Suao, Truant?

Also, would it be suicidal to attempt that road on motorcycle/scooter?

Getting excited about summer driving trips in Taiwan, but only have two wheels…

[quote=“Dangermouse”]That picture says it all.

Without the dirty litter bugs, Taiwan would be difficult to top.[/quote]

:s true… I’ve been on offroad motorcycle trips up rivers deep into the practically unreachable by any other means, remote depths of the Taiwanese mountains… and found pink plastic barbeque bowls and other garbage left in the river… :idunno:

[quote=“rooftop”]Beautiful pictures!

Is that the road to/from Suao, Truant?

Also, would it be suicidal to attempt that road on motorcycle/scooter?

Getting excited about summer driving trips in Taiwan, but only have two wheels…[/quote]
Indeed it is the road from Suao to Hualien.

I’d give it a go on a scooter, no problems. The only real danger (other than the standard :loco: passing manuevres) is the tunnels. There are quite a few, and one is about 1.6km I think. I wouldn’t want any psycho car drivers passing me in there, so I’d be squirting it to keep the same pace as cars.
As I mentioned above the average speed on that road is around 50 km, so a scooter/motorcycle would be no hassle.
I’m sure there are plenty of people here that have done it.
Oh, I guess it would get pretty windy along there at certain times also, and of course the odd falling rock adds to the excitement.

Same road in May 2002:

I miss Taiwan… :frowning:

However, usually my GF wants us to stay with her family when we travel to Taiwan. I was lucky back in 2002 because most of her family members happened to be out of the country for a week, so we took her sister’s car and drove across the island. :slight_smile:

You should get an award for that! Could be a new genre… Litter and Beauty, a Photographer’s Tour of Taiwan

did you pick up the litter when you were done photographing it? I hope so
I am pretty sure that every single one of us has left some litter behind when we get out into nature. Maybe not intentionally, but it’s hard to avoid, being the filthy animals that we humans are. Still, there are very few people who are willing to pick up anybody elses litter.

This isn’t any justification for littering at all, but, I find it friggen impossible to find Trash Cans in the most likely places (i.e. carparks, bus stops, along the street.)
I’m sure there’s a logical explanation for this, like they get stolen or people fill them up with domestic/shop rubbish - but providing convenient trash cans would go someway to changing the littering mentality here I believe.

[quote=“ididn’tdoit”]
did you pick up the litter when you were done photographing it? I hope so
I am pretty sure that every single one of us has left some litter behind when we get out into nature. Maybe not intentionally, but it’s hard to avoid, being the filthy animals that we humans are. Still, there are very few people who are willing to pick up anybody elses litter.[/quote]

I should take a photo of Jinshan beach (all three of them) - they’re covered with all sorts of trash - plastic bottles, old slippers, fishing equipment etc etc. The locals say it comes from the ocean and there’s nothing one could do about it - they don’t seem to think it’s a problem. But the question is - how does it all get into the ocean?? Do dead fish turn into pink slippers after a while?

[quote=“truant”]This isn’t any justification for littering at all, but, I find it friggen impossible to find Trash Cans in the most likely places (i.e. carparks, bus stops, along the street.)I’m sure there’s a logical explanation for this, like they get stolen or people fill them up with domestic/shop rubbish - but providing convenient trash cans would go someway to changing the littering mentality here I believe.[/quote]truant - An excellent Q. I also have wondered about the lack of public trash cans.
I see a rare few outside of some of the sidewalk businesses, but around stores, food shops, university campuses, etc. they just are non-existent.
Hard for the islanders to learn proper trash disposal if there’s no place to put their trash.

there is also no education as to how screwed up littering is and fines are never enforced.

i dont know what its like in the UK, US etc but in Oz we are bombarded with advertising as to the impacts of littering and fines are regularly enforced. taiwan needs some edu-ma-cation programs.

all it would take would be for xiao S to do a few ads about how bad, dirty, and even un-cool littering is and the yoof would stop in a flash…

You should get an award for that! Could be a new genre… Litter and Beauty, a Photographer’s Tour of Taiwan[/quote]

GREAT pic, says it all!

Well yes, it will have to be the east side of the island, doesn’t it? My sister and brother-in-law visited me three weeks ago and we went on a round-the-island trip. What a pity that, on the west side, one can be driving IN the hills and not really know they’re there for the haze of pollution. We went on the DaPu road from Alishan to Kenting, and it was SUCH a pity that the AIR, in this case, was so dirty that one couldn’t appreciate the natural beauty at all.

I guess it’s better to stick to the east coast, or wait for a typhoon and go travel only after it has spent itself. This way, one would possibly be able to see that there are actually hills and mountains in the south and west of the country, that they are green and that they can be beautiful, too.

I don’t think that the poor vis can be attributed only to air pollution - water vapour in the air has a lot to do with nasty visibility.
But still, the pollution is pretty bad.

:bravo: dangermouse, alot of people attribute the haze to pollution rather than the high level of water vapour.