What's that meat in "beef noodles"?


#1

What is the meat in beef noodles?

  • Beef, you moron!
  • Beef, but the part just behind the hoof.
  • What to do with dead horses in Taiwan?
  • Chou tofu looks different after leaving the intestines.
  • Yum! Looks like roadkill, but tastes like tire rubber!
  • Did you just pull my finger?
  • Where do residents of Orchid Island store THEIR nuclear waste?
  • I give up. What’s a colonic?

0 voters

Beef? Like from a cow? I hardly think so. That meat is so gristly and unidentifiable that it must not be what it is represented to be.
So what the hell is that stuff in beef noodles?


#2

I could tell you but then I’d have to kill you.


#3

And use your body in my next batch of ‘beef’ noodle soup.


#4

Some localized version of Sweeny Todd?


#5

I thought I had it figured out, but the answer turned out to be an urban legend.


#6

A Taiwanese friend informed me that the gristly bits are the best and are more expensive than all that nasty meat. Apparently the tendons etc. are where the ‘chi’ life force, as in ‘Tai Chi’, flow. Eating them is better for you than eating lean red beef.

I whinged anyway, and she gave me a special bowl with lumps of plain old meat in it. You can only respect other people’s ways so much.

Personally I think it’s just a rationalisation for being secretly too stingy to throw away the parts of the animal that the rest of us would rather not have to face over dinner. I have this vision of chinese abattoirs being places where animals are dropped whole into the meat grinder so as not to waste anything.


#7

I love beef tendon and noodles! And yes, the tendons are probably “better” for you… they are pure protein and thus, no fat. Its an acquired taste, perhaps. But then again, so is Guinness… and I think quite a few people would agree that Guinness is akin to mother’s milk :wink:


#8

I wholeheartedly agree.


#9

150 people have viewed this thread and yet only 15 have voted.
What the fukc?


#10

Beef, you moron!

There, I voted twice.


#11

150 people have viewed this thread and yet only 15 have voted.
What the fukc?

Perhaps the choices of the poll have offended them!?


#12

I think a more constructive approach to this thread is recommending your favorite beef noodles joint. I’m sure we’ll get more response than the dearth of votes so far.

My personal favorite is Yong Kang beef noodles, located in the alley in the southeast block of Xin Yi Rd. and Jin Shan S. Rd intersection. There’s a multi-story parking garage at the alley’s entrance on Jin Shan. No suspect-looking meat here.


#13

The life force ‘chi’ is qi (pinyin), chi is (among other things) eat (in Chinese using pinyin). The chi in Taichi is actually ‘ji’ (pronounced gee) I’m not sure what that means. This is why we need some standard. Sorry for being of topic but I wanted to clear that up. Yes I did vote.

And I like those grisly bits.


#14

It’s 10% beef and 90% fat.


#15

Off the thread initially… but Tai Qi - as in the slowed down martial art come exercise is “qi” as in energy (loosely) not “gee.” Tai Ji (“gee”) is the Taoist symbol yin/yang birth of yin, birth of yang thang. The “ji” (gee) means ultimate, final etc. as in the north and south poles Bei Ji / Nan Ji.

Onto the tendon noodles. Lots of Chinese dishes use the indgredients aimed for, thus tendons are good for the tendons and strength overall. Of course this then flows on to way whackier guff like “triple whip soup” - dog, donkey and seal dick and balls which is good for…you get the idea.

I have heard that the beef is often water buffalo or “huang niu” but then
I have seen that especially advertised. I’ve been in situations where Taiwanese with a rural background won’t eat it out of respect to their trusty pre-tractor machines, the water buffalo.

HG


#16

niu-rou-mian usually isn’t one of my first choices because they often make it so oily. i’ll probably get attacked for this but i like the san shang qiao fu one, not too oily, lots of weijing but it tastes good. usually get the tangmian though. didn’t vote, thought it was a joke


#17

There are at least 8 Taiwanese attorneys at my firm who will not eat beef for that very reason, even though they are removed from an agrarian life-style by several generations.


#18

There are at least 8 Taiwanese attorneys at my firm who will not eat beef for that very reason, even though they are removed from an agrarian life-style by several generations.[/quote]

Same with me – my boss won’t eat beef for that reason, and I’m pretty sure he never set foot on a paddy in his life.


#19

There are at least 8 Taiwanese attorneys at my firm who will not eat beef for that very reason, even though they are removed from an agrarian life-style by several generations.[/quote]

Same with me – my boss won’t eat beef for that reason, and I’m pretty sure he never set foot on a paddy in his life.[/quote]

I’ve eaten many a black angus that I’ve raised. But, of course they didn’t help out much on the farm… they were in fact one of the primary reasons for having the farm… we used a couple of big John Deere tractors and a BIG International Harvester Combine. Mmmm… good beef!


#20

[quote=“daltongang”] i’ll probably get attacked for this but i like the san shang qiao fu one, not too oily, lots of weijing but it tastes good. [/quote]No attack from me. I agree that the San Shang Qiao Fu chain serves half decent beef noodles. I go there every once in a while. I always order a raw egg in my noodles (extra $5 NT). When you eat it, pull the hot noodles through the egg yolk and you’ll get this delicious egg-yolk-glazed noodles. Try it the next time you go.