What's with this poop


#1

What’s with this poop in a cup thing I keep hearing about?

Oh, this is regards to physicals I suppose. Do they actually make you do this?


#2

Yes, the old poop and scoop is for real, at least in Kaohsiung. They check it for intestinal parasites. We actually had a teaceher get kicked out the country a few years ago because they foud these parasites and were worried they might be contagious. The teacher couldn’t come back until he had proof the parasites were no longer in his system.


#3

I just learned Kaohsiung doesn’t require it anymore either.


#4

If you are getting a residency ARC based on marriage you will still have to shit in the cup. Last year the hospital even let me take the cup home as I just couldn’t produce. Brought it back the netx day in a discreet paper bag. Should have given them something from my cat litter.


#5

I thought the poop test was only for manual labourers, nurses and maids (because they mostly come from south-east Asian countries where intestinal parasites are widespread) and teachers (irrespective of nationality, because they come into close physical contact with children.) As a media worker, I’ve done the pee test several times but got let off the poop test. They nearly made me do it last time, but when I pulled a face, they told me I could skip it. I suppose as a foreign spouse you will be in close physical contact with your wife, so…

I did hear about a Filipina nurse in Sanchong who was found to have some kind of amoeba, which she must have picked up in Taiwan because she didn’t have it when she first arrived. Believe it or not, she was deported the next day, bundled off to the airport by some thugs who might have been police, but more likely hired by the labour broker. So much for human rights in Taiwan.


#6

intestinal parasites

Excuse my ignorance but what are those or how do you know you got them / doe they show any symptoms?


#7
quote:
Originally posted by Rascal: [b]intestinal parasites[/b]

Excuse my ignorance but what are those or how do you know you got them / doe they show any symptoms?


Why? Are you worried? I suppose…well…I had a cat once. And when she had worms, they would literally wriggle out of her butt. I guess another symptom would be weight loss and crapping blood. But please, if you even suspect that you got something, go get it checked out.


#8

For the basic health test for English teachers you don’t have to shit in a cup. Problem is some hospitals will have one form for all health tests and that includes everything, so even if you aren’t legally required you’ll have to do it to fit into their form (this happened to me at MacKay. That’s why if you’re in Taipei, you should got to Renai Hospital. They’re all set up for it. It’s cheapest and fastest.

Bri


#9

I had to do it in ChiaYi county, as do all English teachers, annually. Yuck…
The Filipinas nannies and Thai factory workers here tell me that they have to do it every six months, so I pity them more than myself, which is quite a bit.

If you do have to do it, bring some toilet tissue or steal a box from the desk. Or ideally, go to a place where it’s not required. Yes, that’s a far more pleasant thought.

They also take blood and urine, as well as height and weight measurements. Then a doctor jabs at your ribs presumably to feel your internal organs. One guy in our school told us that he was made to undergo a GENITAL exam, but no one else backs this up.


#10

Oh, Renai in Taipei is the place to go for sure.

The doctors there are so well trained, they can look at your face and know that ALL your internal organs are normal. Yep…stomach, CHECK! liver, CHECK! and so on. It’s really an astounding advance in medicine. In fact the last time around I didn’t have to give them any bodily fluids at all apart from blood.

Personally I always have a bit of trouble on the color-blindness test. I wonder why that’s essential. Are they worried that I might get a job in a buxiban and teach the kids “red” for “green”??

Terry