Where else but Taiwan?

As per request, a new tourism slogan:

[quote]British taxis, subway trains and news media have all become new vehicles to help attract visitors to Taiwan, as part of a massive tourism promotion blitz launched in the United Kingdom. Taiwan’s Tourism Bureau has paid 75 classic London black cabs a total of 250,000 British pounds (about US$390,625) to carry “Where else but Taiwan” posters on their daily street cruises over the next three months.

The bureau has also commissioned British public relations and creative advertisement companies to design and put out 1,000 ads, which promote Taiwan as Asia’s least known travel destination, in the London subway system weekly over the next six weeks.

[/quote]
chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/t-bu … unches.htm

I thought we were already Asia’s least known destination… :ponder:

And what’s with the choice of the word “blitz”? :astonished:

‘Blitz’ is OK in that context, but I understand your reservations. :laughing:

People don’t come to Taiwan for tourism for the same reason they don’t go to Korea, Japan, the Philippines, etc - for the simply reason that we’re in a deep economic recession and for most people it’s really expensive to go on their hols to the other side of the world, especially if they have no family connections there.

Brits are also generally into beach hols, because it’s freezing, eight months of the year. Going up mountains in the Taiwanese humidity is not an attractive proposition to most Brits.

Taiwan is aces, but it’s not going to become a ‘Thailand’ for Brits for lots of reasons that have nothing to do with Taiwan as a place. they’d probably do better going for a cheaper, more targetted campaign, IMO. Hikers, culture, stuff like that, not just blanket coverage with daft slogans.

Quarter of a million quid! Hook me u with a few grand and I’ll get some folk coming your way. Probably not a quarter of a million’s worth though …

You are right Buttercup, it would be better to spend on hikers, birds, culture enthusiasts, tea drinkers…it’s still better than nothing though.

Yeah, I just think for the vast majority of Brits who have the cash to sink on an Asian trip, they’d proabably choose somewhere more ‘beachy’. You’re looking at people who have ‘done’ all that.

I’m not a marketing expert, though. Taxi campaigns must ‘pay back’ in terms of coverage.

The most likely beneficiary of this advertising campaign will be Thailand… whenever I am home everyone always says “Ohh really, Taiwan… I hear they have really nice beaches there… your not very suntanned though” :raspberry:

I wouldn’t be targeting the UK at this point in time. Everyone’s holidaying domestically.

One free way to get foreigners to spend more in Taiwan would be to extend the period of time people have to leave after their ARCs are cancelled to, say, three months. They can’t claim off the state, so would just be living off their savings getting pissed in Kending.

Discriminatory foreign worker policies, tight visa regs, and no tourist infrastructure and they are wasting $250,000 quid on a tourism policy? Great job guys, how did all those Mainland tourists work out for you again?

I’d say they need to go for targetted advertising towards people that would like Taiwan’s strengths like bird watching, hiking, mountaineering and biking; and possibly sport fishing and medical tourism.

When I think of Brits and holiday I think Thailand or India.

Should anyone actually end up on Taiwan because of these ads, the slogan is likely to bit the designers in the arse. “Where else but Taiwan would you see five peole on a scooter?” “Where else but Taiwan to people wear helmets, but not put them on their children?” Etc . . .

But yes, it seems more likely that someone would end up in Thailand, instead.

And really, shouldn’t that be, “Only in Taiwan?” Same potential there for a bitten arse, though.

They should take the foreign engineer’s moto, “The “TiT” (This is Taiwan) factor.” Then they could say, “This is Taiwan” as the focus a camera on the breast of women comming from the MRT, or on the beach, or whatever. “Welcome to Taiwan, come check out the TiT factor,” or something. But I guess they already have enough foreign guys here rogering their women.

“This is Taiwan” would still be a better slogan, though, with shots of Taroko, Kenteen, shots of people snorkeling, 101, a nice clean bubble tea stand, a good night market, the Grand . . . .

[quote=“tomthorne”]One free way to get foreigners to spend more in Taiwan would be to extend the period of time people have to leave after their ARCs are cancelled to, say, three months. [/quote] Brilliant. That is some fabulous free advice, you government people! Pay attention.
So many people leave without ever really having had a chance to explore the island because they were working 6 days a week, and then had to leave the day after their contract ended. Give them a chance to blow their wad here. (= spend their savings on tourism)

I think there are still Brits travelling through south-east Asia. I met a fair few in Borneo, though they’d all come from, or were off to, just about anywhere in this half of Asia but Taiwan. Japan, China, south-east Asia, India, no Taiwan though. Besides, it’s expensive here compared to all of those except Japan, and let’s be honest, Taiwan’s top drawcards aren’t that exciting. Surely there are dozens of places as good as Taroko (my wife and I tried to take my friend there last year and the whole thing turned out to be a complete farce having to rely on using public transport and taxis, and that was on the weekend!), and I know there are hundreds of places better than Kending. There are night markets, tea houses, modern buildings, etc. all over Asia, and in cheaper environments to boot. Putting it simply, Taiwan lacks the different cool factors and costs of Japan at one end and Laos at the other end. It’s in tourist limbo, and people probably figure (rightly or wrongly, I don’t know), that if they want to experience “Chinese” culture, why not go to China?

It’s like pitching to someone thinking of going to Europe that they should go to Slovakia of all places, or someone going to North America and hitting up Oklahoma.

That said, it’s not as difficult or expensive to get here as it once was. AirAsia flies to/from London and also to/from Taipei, though not directly between the two.

Seems all innocent discussions or questions just becomes a debate on how messed up or chabuduo Taiwan is or whatever…

I just want to suggest that everyone should be a little more positive, because a lot of new expats comes here seeking information on how to do something or find something, not hear people complain how awful Taiwan is or what the government should but didn’t do to improve things. Let’s face it every country has its problems and it takes little effort on google to find information on how much America, Europe, UK, SA, whatever sucks. I feel that many of the negative comments about Taiwan borders on national superiority (like the my country is better than yours kind of attitude).

Look I am pretty sure you wouldn’t like it if some foreigner in America just started telling you how much America sucked 2 minutes after he got off the plane. Please just enjoy what the country has to offer, there are good things about Taiwan that you just wouldn’t have in America (or wherever you’re from). If there is something really backward happening just know it takes time to change people because Taiwan modernized practically overnight, and it takes much longer for people to modernize unfortunately. If something dangerous and illegal is going on (like 5 people on a scooter) there are relevant authorities who will take action, we all got a camera phone right? I am sure Ministry of Transportation will do something about it if they keep getting calls and concerns about this.

All I want to say is, please keep the negative things about Taiwan to yourself and we have to do our parts too if we want things done right. I have seen foreigners on scooters who drive just as bad as a Taiwanese. I often tell Taiwanese workers who feels like they’re getting screwed to take action if they want fair treatment, the laws are adequate but we can’t expect the government to enforce our rights for us, so we need to tell the relevant agency or even unionize if necessary.

but where would we rant?

[quote=“icon”]Taiwan’s Tourism Bureau has paid 75 classic London black cabs a total of 250,000 British pounds (about US$390,625) to carry [color=#FF0000]“Where else but Taiwan”[/color] posters on their daily street cruises over the next three months.[/quote]I think [color=#FF0000]“Taiwan UP”[/color] would have been a better choice for the taxi adverts. Very classy, universally understood, grammatically correct, and cheaper because it uses less letters! :roflmao:

Be careful of this “Taiwan Up!” thing. I had a very negative experience with it involving the office aiyi and a pot of coffee. It’s not for the uninitiated or faint of heart.

Get Freddy Laker, if he’s still alive, to do some cheap package flights to Taiwan.

Pack in the Sun Seekers, fill 'em full of Stella and dump 'em here on the island.

They’ll be screamin’ and streamin’ back to Torremolinos!

Taiwan Luthiers: It’s not seeing five people on a scooter that’s the problem. That’s all well and good. Plenty of tourists wouldn’t have a problem with that. What they would have a problem with is that they can go to other places that have that kind of crazy stuff and pay half (or less) the price for the experience (not including airfare, of course). Like I said, Taiwan is stuck in limbo. If people want highly developed Asia, they go to Japan or Singapore. If they want a place that is on the cusp, they probably go to big Chinese cities. If they want a place that is raw, cheap or has pristine natural attractions, they go to any one of a dozen other places in the region that are much cheaper and more “authentic”. Seriously, what’s Taiwan’s target demographic? I don’t think it’s backpackers and I don’t think it’s older people, professionals or anyone else for that matter.

[quote=“Taiwan Luthiers”]Seems all innocent discussions or questions just becomes a debate on how messed up or chabuduo Taiwan is or whatever…

I just want to suggest that everyone should be a little more positive, because a lot of new expats comes here seeking information on how to do something or find something, not hear people complain how awful Taiwan is or what the government should but didn’t do to improve things. Let’s face it every country has its problems and it takes little effort on google to find information on how much America, Europe, UK, SA, whatever sucks. I feel that many of the negative comments about Taiwan borders on national superiority (like the my country is better than yours kind of attitude).

Look I am pretty sure you wouldn’t like it if some foreigner in America just started telling you how much America sucked 2 minutes after he got off the plane. Please just enjoy what the country has to offer, there are good things about Taiwan that you just wouldn’t have in America (or wherever you’re from). If there is something really backward happening just know it takes time to change people because Taiwan modernized practically overnight, and it takes much longer for people to modernize unfortunately. If something dangerous and illegal is going on (like 5 people on a scooter) there are relevant authorities who will take action, we all got a camera phone right? I am sure Ministry of Transportation will do something about it if they keep getting calls and concerns about this.

All I want to say is, please keep the negative things about Taiwan to yourself and we have to do our parts too if we want things done right. I have seen foreigners on scooters who drive just as bad as a Taiwanese. I often tell Taiwanese workers who feels like they’re getting screwed to take action if they want fair treatment, the laws are adequate but we can’t expect the government to enforce our rights for us, so we need to tell the relevant agency or even unionize if necessary.[/quote]

OK, I am sure the coppers love to hunt 5 people on a scooter because a furriner takes a photo, but it is still no tourist destination, right? I only recommend it to computer geeks for the Computex or to language or Chinese culture enthusiasts. I have heard there are three or four… Probably.

" I often tell Taiwanese workers who feels like they’re getting screwed to take action if they want fair treatment, the laws are adequate but we can’t expect the government to enforce our rights for us, so we need to tell the relevant agency or even unionize if necessary."

Like that will work… complain about your boss to the government and… well, you know the ending. Most of the locals will just take it and chalk it up to the fact that all the bosses are the same.

And the laws are adequate?? :laughing: :smiley: :roflmao: :unamused:

Taiwan is authentic, authentic Taiwanese…if nothing else there is nowhere like it! Actually the east coast of Taiwan is certainly a tourist destination…it’s just hard to get to.

headhoncho: Of course it’s “authentic”. That’s such a ridiculous term. No one expects the British to all live in Tudor-style houses and sanitary conditions. However, it’s part of the strange idea about “authenticity” that when people come to Asia, they have some idea about buying handwoven baskets and kids selling them fresh coconuts on the beach for 10c/10p.

I have to admit that it’s part of why I found large cities in Canada fucking boring. It’s not that they weren’t cool, it’s that they were so similar to large cities in Australia (which is why I also have little desire to see more large cities in Australia, or in English speaking countries in general). People aren’t going to come to Taiwan for the urban population and environment in the main. They could get that wherever they come from, to an extent.

Is the east coast a tourist destination? If we take out Taiwanese tourists (and even foreigners living here), I think we’d find that the number of visitors is negligible. Surely one little place like Phuket would get more visitors in about a month than the whole of the Taiwanese east coast would get in one year.