Who can teach?


#1

This Taipei Times article yesterday has gopt me confused:
taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … /26/192460

Now I thought everyone knew that (for a foreigner) to teach legally in Taiwan you must have a passport and degree from one of the few western English-speaking countries.

Now this article is saying stuff like “under the Employment Services Act, the nationalities of English teachers are not profiled by law in Taiwan. Can the MOE halt the import of Filipinos and Indians to teach English in Taiwan?” and "the MOE has no grounds on which to oppose the hiring of English teachers from the Philippines and India " also “It’s not up to the MOE to decide whether private cram schools can recruit teachers from these two countries, as these teachers are subject to the Supplementary Education Law”

WTF?

Then how come Dutch, Swedis, Israeli etc etc teachers with excellent English have never been allowed to teach here?

What the hell’s going on?

Brian


#2

Then how come Dutch, Swedis, Israeli etc etc teachers with excellent English have never been allowed to teach here?

What the hell’s going on?

Brian

Brian,

I think that actually at a private buxie any English speaker can theoretically be allowed to teach here. The law does not say who can and who cannot teach, just that they must be native speakers of the lingo.

Same with reporters, I heard. Anyone of any nationality can be a reporter at the English papes here, as long as they have the proper props. There have been Tibetan, Indian, Swedish, Filipino (Nancy Tee Lu is one) and Nigerian reporters in the past. THey can also teach in private schools. Sure.

But who would hire them? There’s the rub.


#3

Did the Director of The British Council really say “what particularly kind of accent”?


#4

Formosa wrote [quote]The law does not say who can and who cannot teach, just that they must be native speakers of the lingo[/quote]True, but those native speakers need to come from either US, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland or South Africa.

Sir Donald Bradman wrote

[quote]Now I thought everyone knew that (for a foreigner) to teach legally in Taiwan you must have a passport and degree from one of the few western English-speaking countries. [/quote]If you have an OWP, you need neither of the above.


#5

They import Filipino & Indian English teachers? I thought they only import teachers from English speaking countries other than the above.


#6

Well I’d need clarification of this, but I suspect that MAYBE what’s going on is that the LAW (ie from the legislature) says that you have to be a native speaker of English to teach, but the MOE has, as we all know, always interpreted the law in their regulations to mean that you have to have a passport (and degree?) from US, Canada, UK, Australia, NZ or SA. Hence the situation where we’ve always known that it was ‘illegal’ to teach if you weren’t from one of those countries, but now these people are saying that there’s nothing in the law that says you can’t.

Anyone know for sure?

Brian


#7

Hartzel wrote [quote]To answer your question, yes the holder of an OWP can work as a teacher anywhere if the employer wishes to hire him/her. The holder of an OWP may also work as a private teacher, without an employer. Anyone is says otherwise is mistaken. [/quote]I don’t know whether or not this is veering of topic Bri, but I just want to clarify that from what i understand, it doesn’t matter which country you are from, is somebody wants to hire you to do anything in Taiwan, with this piece of paper, well, you practically can.


#8

Well yeah, I’m guessing that these teachers from the Phillipines and India, don’t have OWPs, which would mean that to teach English they’d have to get work permits form the MOE. If the Ministry refused to give them based on their regulations that require you to have a passport from US, Canada, Aus, NZ or SA, then perhaps these agencies (who now seem to be backed by some legislators or someone - probably people who resent having to pay foreign teachers so much) could appeal the Ministry’s decision based on the fact (although I don’t yet know if it is a act) that the law doesn’t specify this, but just says something like the teachers must be ‘native English speakers’. If they succeeded, just about anybody could teach.

Brian