Why do white women vote Republican?


#61

And not just kids. People in their 40s and 50s as well.


#62

Not to mention people in their 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and older.


#63

For many young people these days to each other. But they usually have enough sense to not say that when black people are around.


#64

I’ve actually never heard the parents of my black friends use the N-word, but maybe they were too polite to use it in my presence. :grin:


#65

Why do I have the creeping feeling that the Guardian will win this battle, and that all us Americans who have direct experience will have said American experience dismissed as mere racism?


#66

Definitely heard this many times in the deep South.


#67

This video is pretty stupid. Don’t know if you guys saw Kendrick Lamar call a white girl on stage to rap along to his song. A song he knows repeats nigga like 50 times or something. And gets mad at the girl for saying it.


#68

Yeah, seen it and it’s a good example of the use of “nigga” being exclusively the right of Lamar and other black Americans. Like, even though he invited her to use his own lyrics.


#69

Girl needs to be humble, sit down.


#70

I don’t have any black friends, so I’ll have to take your word for it. People 60+ call each other niggers. I honestly didn’t think that could be the case, but I accept your experience.


#71

Really dick move by him. She’s clearly a fan and was excited to just flow with his lyrics that he wrote. This all from a guy who has no issues with wearing a traditional Chinese shirt in his music video.

Another example was Kenyon Martin calling out Jeremy Lin for having dreads. Lin killed him with some sophisticated shade pointing to how Kenyon has Chinese tattoos lol.


#72

Whatever. It’s hardly a new word in the American lexicon.


#73

No ones uses nigger with a R at the end really. That’s still overall offensive. But nigga with the A is what is used more loosely amongst black people…and often none black people if no ones around.


#74

It was really hard to watch her reaction to the audience’s reaction.

Kendrick Lamar is too talented to lose his livelihood, but that’s a damn shame imo.


#75

I don’t know if he did it on purpose. Why would you get a white person to rap with you on stage to a song you know says nigga like every other rhyme. What did he expect her to do? The song itself literally would not even make sense if you didn’t say the word.


#76

I’ve heard black Americans use the hard “R” to emphasize the contrast in perceived outcomes, once in a liquor store by a black dude who thought his wait in line was a result of prejudice.

It’s become a very powerful word, in all its iterations, in American English.


#77

Well, I agree. Either you’re a sadist or you made a mistake. Making a simple mistake is more likely.


#78

“Whatever”? That’s a bit off, old chap.


#79

Honestly in some of the locker rooms I’ve been in with mostly black team mates. We just let that word lose. It honestly didn’t even mean a black person to us.


#80

This signifies what exactly?

I hear this each and every work day from K - 5th graders. It’s a demeaning, awful word, with or without the -er, historically (and currently) used by racists, then manipulated with pseudo-hogwashy neo-Marxist identity political indoctrination by black and white power elites so that black people feel empowered by using it…on one another. It’s a cultural-linguistic tragedy of epic proportions.

Ha. In the movies maybe.