Why many females means trouble? 姦 = Jiān


#1

Not trying to be sexists, but just curious if anyone knows the story behind it


#2

Welcome to Forumosa, Ipoh! :bowing:

Now excuse me while I enjoy the inevitable flow of snarky comments.
:popcorn:


#3

If you’re from Ipoh, you should already know the answer.


#4

I thought 姦 meant rape? Which, of course, is evil. But that video was just weird. And does 女馬 really mean mother in China?


#5

Those two radicals squashed together, ‘ma’ representing the sound rather than the meaning.


#6


#7

Ohhhhh… I get it. Kinda like how 咬 is 口交 smashed together?
:smirk:


#8

媽 does. as for the other meanings, the chinese were wise, 2 女 could lead to trouble, 3 女 definetly means trouble :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

Biting is not encouraged in the second one.


#10

But it gives a whole new perspective on “bite me!” :wink:


#11

Which is also a colloquial expression in Chinese.


#12

Which is exactly how I learned about those characters.


#13

Now if only “blow me” were a colloquial expression in Chinese. I guess I have my work cut out for me…


#14

i didn’t know ipoh is famous!


#15

Actually, it’s not. But don’t let that get you down. At least you’ve got white coffee and the tin mines.


#16

Nope, it means sex, in a negative tone. 強姦 means rape.

It’s a slang now. 咬咬 means a bj on internet.

It’s no secret that a lot of the languages are machist. See French:


#17

Never thought I’d say this, but I’ll pass on that one…


#18

不要咬咬?

Disclaimer: I’m not offering!


#19

It’s not called a “tooth job” for good reason.


#20

姦 is the original Hanji character for the obscene word “to frak” now commonly written as 幹.

姦 is said to be pronounced as 古顔切, which would be /kan/ in middle Chinese, and it still is pronounced kàn in Taigi, which sounds exactly the same as 幹 in both Taigi and Mandarin.

The /k/ initial eventually went through a palatalization and went from /k/ to /tɕ/ in several Northern Sinitic languages. The palatalization also inserted the /i/ before /an/.

It also meant that somewhere along the line, Northern Chinese felt a need to distinguish the sounds for “evil” and “to frak”. So while the sound for “evil” shifted to /tɕiɛn/, the sound for “to frak” remained /kan/, which they then felt the need to also represent these sounds with separate characters.

For those Sinitic languages closer to Middle Chinese, it’s just 姦 /kan/ for both evil and to frak.