Will foreigners be allowed to stay if war breaks out?

This is kind of a strange question I know, but for those of us married to Taiwanese who don’t have another passport it’s an important one.

I’m assuming that the British gov’t won’t allow the Taiwanese wife/husband of a British national to come to UK if there is a war. Or maybe I’m wrong there. Anyone know? Stragbasher?

Well, if my wife can’t come with me, then I’m staying put, BUT will I be allowed to? Taiwan might want all foreigners to leave.

But wait a minute… there’s also the question of my son, who has a UK passport. I could send him home to stay with grandma and then stay here with the wife. Then we get killed or stuck here and my son doesn’t have any parents. Not such a great idea. So, then we come back to me and son leave Mummy here to fend for herself. Great…

In truth I don’t really know what I would do, or even be allowed to do. :help:

Yes, I’d want to stay if my wife and son couldn’t come. If I couldn’t stay I may go to ground. I am not leaving without them and that is a fact.

I don’t plan on leaving without my bf/partner. However, I would think that your spouses would have the option of citizenship or, atleast, residency in your home countries. Is that not true? Spouses of Americans (at least opposite-sex spouses) can get citizenship or residency through their American spouse. I don’t have that option in the US, however. :bluemad:

Maybe we could apply to Canada for assylum or something. We’ve been thinking of moving there anyway, since they have immigration rights for common-law partners (people in relationships for more than a year – same-sex or opposite sex).

[quote=“Spack”]This is kind of a strange question I know, but for those of us married to Taiwanese who don’t have another passport it’s an important one.

I’m assuming that the British gov’t won’t allow the Taiwanese wife/husband of a British national to come to UK if there is a war. Or maybe I’m wrong there. Anyone know? Stragbasher?

Well, if my wife can’t come with me, then I’m staying put, BUT will I be allowed to? Taiwan might want all foreigners to leave.

But wait a minute… there’s also the question of my son, who has a UK passport. I could send him home to stay with grandma and then stay here with the wife. Then we get killed or stuck here and my son doesn’t have any parents. Not such a great idea. So, then we come back to me and son leave Mummy here to fend for herself. Great…

In truth I don’t really know what I would do, or even be allowed to do. :help:[/quote]

Actually, I think your question is a very good one and probably one that has been on the mind of many of us foreigners recently.
I don’t have a wife, but I consider my Taiwanese girlfriend just like my wife and I too know that it would be impossible to leave her behind if a war happens. However, the truth is that I don’t feel secure in the belief that I could actually do anything to help her if a war broke out here. I mean I really don’t feel that I have too many options but I know that I would not leave Taiwan without her.
Thus, I really hope this day never comes because I don’t want to face this situation at all.

Yes, my wife can get residency one day if she goes to UK and lives there for god knows how long, but I am talking about the war happening with little or no warning.

How does asylum work? Don’t you have to get into the country in the first place and then apply for it?
If you’re stuck in Taiwan when war looms/breaks out without a foreign passport, not even allowed to get near the airport let alone board a plane, that is not going to be an option. :frowning:

[quote=“Spack”]Yes, my wife can get residency one day if she goes to UK and lives there for god knows how long, but I am talking about the war happening with little or no warning.

How does asylum work? Don’t you have to get into the country in the first place and then apply for it?
If you’re stuck in Taiwan when war looms/breaks out without a foreign passport, not even allowed to get near the airport let alone board a plane, that is not going to be an option. :frowning:[/quote]

I don’t know how asylum works. It probably isn’t a valid option… just a spur of the moment thought. However, I’d think that, if the British rep office here had warning of an impending war ahead of time, enough for them to warn you to all get out, then you’d have time to take your wife and any offspring to them and ask for asylum. If they don’t have any warning, well… they’d still be there themselves and you’d still be able to go there, right?

You say you don’t think the British government would allow your wife in in the event of a war. Why not? She is married to a British citizen and you all have a son with a British passport. Maybe it is naive to think they wouldn’t split you all up.

However, again, I don’t have that option, as I’m not legally married to my partner. So, I guess we’d just have to make a run for the Canadian rep office and see what happens. ‘Cause I’m sure the US rep office won’t do diddly for us, especially with good ol’ Dubya in office.

Bassman, would u consider sending your littlun to NZ to be out of danger in the event?

QM, if China gears up for war, then Taiwanese might not be allowed to leave. Imagine the crush at the airport!

It’s only an assumption that British officials would let my wife travel with me and my son back to UK. Just cuz she’s married to me and has a British son is no guarantee. After all she does not have a UK passport, no residency, nothing. I hope I am wrong on this point.

For your sake, I hope you are too. Actually, for all of our sakes, I hope a war is averted and never happens.

But, at least being married to you, she will have a “legitimate” reason to leave the country, unlike the rest of the “crush” at the airport. You (and anyone else that is married) can show something legal that may (and I’m not saying it is a guarantee, either) get her on a plane.

I’ll just have to hunker down with my partner and his family. 'Cause they will have to drag me out of here to get me to leave without him. And, I don’t think he will leave without his parents & sister…

From what I understand of New Zealand law, spouses of citizens can claim PR pretty much automatically. It’s just the technicality of getting there that I’m unsure of. Should you apply for a tourist visa first, and then apply for PR in NZ? Probably not. When we went on holiday they asked me “It’s just a visit then? Your wife’s not planning on applying for residency?”. Hmm. Makes me curious. Maybe I should ring up and check. I guess you’d have to apply first, and if you were wanting to leave in a hurry that wouldn’t be possible. Maybe go to a third country on a tourist visa first.

Brian

Anyone know what the deal is for spouses of Americans? A friend was complaining that the process for an immigrant fiancee visa (K-1) can take over a year nowadays; I’ve heard the immigrant spousal visa (K-3) can take even longer. But in the event of a sudden need to travel, is there a “landing visa” like Taiwan has?

Don’t know about landing visa, but when the Dearly Departed married me a few years back, he got his spouse visa without much delay (although it did take a couple of trips to AIT). I believe that when we went to AIT, he applied as an immigrant to the US (he certainly knew what HE wanted :raspberry: ). In the case of Americans, perhaps it would be a good idea for the spouse/SO of Americans to have an entry visa ready in the passport regardless of whether there are plans to immigrate – I mean at least a tourist visa which allows entry. If there were a full-blown war on, I would imagine you could do SOMETHING when spouse/SO was already in the US.

But let’s hope this is all hypothetical.

In an emergency situation - eg one where the Foreign Office is recommending Brits to leave - the BTCO is able to issue on-the-spot visas to dependents of British Citizens. Spouses and children would automatically qualify, and (this is not an official policy statement here) other persons with whom you have a close relationship would probably be OK too. The BTCO has quite a lot of flexibility in these situations.

Governments don’t usually break up family units, and British law recognises ‘common law’ marriages. I dunno about NZ, but Australia has the same deal and calls it a ‘de facto’ marriage. Put yourself in the position of the issuing officer - who is incidentally a nice guy - in a crisis. You have hundreds of people queueing up, immense pressure, and you are not going to have the time or the heart to argue with someone yelling “but, we’re in love”. So long term partners can probably get out of here if needs must.

I don’t know what the policy would be for same sex relationships.

Will keep you posted if I hear anything more on this front. I’m sitting tight for the moment.

[quote=“ironlady”]Don’t know about landing visa, but when the Dearly Departed married me a few years back, he got his spouse visa without much delay (although it did take a couple of trips to AIT). I believe that when we went to AIT, he applied as an immigrant to the US (he certainly knew what HE wanted :raspberry: ). In the case of Americans, perhaps it would be a good idea for the spouse/SO of Americans to have an entry visa ready in the passport regardless of whether there are plans to immigrate – I mean at least a tourist visa which allows entry. If there were a full-blown war on, I would imagine you could do SOMETHING when spouse/SO was already in the US.

But let’s hope this is all hypothetical.[/quote]

I think you should remove SO for those statements. If you aren’t a legal spouse of an American citizen, I think you will have no chance of getting into the US. The current state of the government and their policies strongly suggest this.

Besides, if a war breaks out, and you have a visitor’s visa (spouse or not), it may or may not be valid anymore. Besides, who is to say the Taiwanese government would even allow one of their citizen’s to leave, even with the appropriate visa for a foreign country.

What makes any of you think you’ll be able to get out? If the PRC decides to have a war do you REALLY think they’ll be sending invitations so everyone can get packed up and dressed in their Sunday best? Their first targets will be the airports! Sheesh! :unamused: If there is a war and you are lucky, you’ll probably have to only spend $100,000US for deck space on a leaky fishing boat out of Suao on it’s way to Okinawa.

head towards the hills. away from airports, away from government centers, and away from yonghe/zhonghe. or squat near a anti-missile battery and cross your fingers.

The situation for partners of British citizens is as follows (a similar condition exists for most EU citizens).

[quote]A non-EU citizen who is a same-sex cohabiting partner of a UK resident can obtain permission to reside in the UK with their partner, once they have lived together for two years (NB all EU citizens have a right to reside in the UK).

The situation is a great improvement on that of just a few years ago when there was no such provision, but the rules can still be difficult to meet. They can be read in their entirety on the Immigration and Nationality Directorate web site but can be briefly summarised as follows:

[ul]1. The couple must be living together in a relationship “akin to marriage” which has continued for two years or more (interpreted by the Home Office to mean two years’ cohabitation).
2. The “foreign” partner must be legally in the United Kingdom at the time of the application and must not have previously entered the United Kingdom illegally.
3. The couple must be able to support and accommodate themselves without using public funds.
4. Any previous relationship for either partner must have permanently broken down.
5. The couple must intend to remain together permanently.[/ul]

Alternatively, if you have been living together outside the United Kingdom in a relationship akin to marriage which has subsisted for four years or more and you are a British citizen or entitled to settlement or otherwise have the right of abode in the United Kingdom, your “foreign” partner may be granted indefinite leave immediately (rather than a 24 month probationary period).[/quote]

You’re right - in the event of a surprise attack. A surprise attack is not the only scenario, although you could argue it’s the most likely one.

[quote=“QuietMountain”][quote=“ironlady”]Don’t know about landing visa, but when the Dearly Departed married me a few years back, he got his spouse visa without much delay (although it did take a couple of trips to AIT). I believe that when we went to AIT, he applied as an immigrant to the US (he certainly knew what HE wanted :raspberry: ). In the case of Americans, perhaps it would be a good idea for the spouse/SO of Americans to have an entry visa ready in the passport regardless of whether there are plans to immigrate – I mean at least a tourist visa which allows entry. If there were a full-blown war on, I would imagine you could do SOMETHING when spouse/SO was already in the US.

But let’s hope this is all hypothetical.[/quote]

I think you should remove SO for those statements. If you aren’t a legal spouse of an American citizen, I think you will have no chance of getting into the US. The current state of the government and their policies strongly suggest this.

[/quote]

My SO could get into the U.S. since he already has a US visa, as Ironlady has suggested.

The only thing to do is to get a couple of slabs of your favourite beer and a few bags of ice in case the power goes out. Then go out on your balcony or roof to watch the whole thing and pray to God that the US 7th fleet does something. If the shit hits the fan in the next few days, you and yours are more likely to be kept safe by pilots flying from the deck of the USS Kittyhawk than by stiff shirt bureaucrats at the AIT, BTCO, etc.

I’m not questioning whether holding a visa (already) would allow your partner to get into the US. I’m questioning whether the Taiwanese governement would let anyone leave. If s/he has a legal entry visa, there is a good chance that the US will honor it. Though, if China complained, who’s to say Bush’s administration wouldn’t cave and invalidate any visas.

However, your partner still has to go through immigration control here in Taiwan. Who is to say Taiwanese citizens would be allowed off the island.

[quote=“spack”][quote=“blueface666”]
What makes any of you think you’ll be able to get out? If the PRC decides to have a war do you REALLY think they’ll be sending invitations so everyone can get packed up and dressed in their Sunday best? Their first targets will be the airports! Sheesh! If there is a war and you are lucky, you’ll probably have to only spend $100,000US for deck space on a leaky fishing boat out of Suao on it’s way to Okinawa.[/quote]

You’re right - in the event of a surprise attack. A surprise attack is not the only scenario, although you could argue it’s the most likely one.[/quote]

I’m not sure you could argue it is the most likely one. But, it is a possibility. And, yes, in that case, there would probably no way off the island, initially. But, ultimately, I don’t think China could get away with detaining foreign nationals for too long. Though, there is no guaranteeing they won’t try.