*&$%*#$ Windows USB won't recognise my *&#(#*#& iRiver!

A dear friend was kind enough to gift me with his iRiver S10, an amazingly compact MP3 player for its capacity.
It’s always been a wee bit hinky when it comes to Windows recognising its presence (Windows is SO crap at the USB thing), but recently, I can’t get it to be recognised at all, on numerous different machines, not just with the user software, but even in Explorer.
It does, however, charge just fine through the USB port when plugged in.
WTF??!??!?

I hope someone can help you there, Chief, I got the same problem with a damned iPod.

HG

Please feel free to beat me around the head if this sounds like the equivalent of ‘have you turned the power on?’, but have you tried letting the power completely run down then plugging it in?

[quote=“the chief”]A dear friend was kind enough to gift me with his iRiver S10, an amazingly compact MP3 player for its capacity.
It’s always been a wee bit hinky when it comes to Windows recognising its presence (Windows is SO crap at the USB thing), but recently, I can’t get it to be recognised at all, on numerous different machines, not just with the user software, but even in Explorer.
It does, however, charge just fine through the USB port when plugged in.
WTF??!??!?[/quote]

Hey chief. I need to know your Windows version and Windows Media Player version. Some really annoying changes relating to recognising USB mp3 players happened around Windows Media Player version 10.

Another silly question, you are plugging it straight into your computer and not a USB hub ? You said it could charge so I assume it is getting power.

Why would you need to let the power run down, that’s a very girly thing to say, I’m guessing it uses Li-ion batteries which don’t suffer from the memory effect. If you let ni-cads (standard AA rechargables), it would probably damage them as one discharges before another and they start charging each other.

[quote=“irishstu”][quote=“the chief”]A dear friend was kind enough to gift me with his iRiver S10, an amazingly compact MP3 player for its capacity.
It’s always been a wee bit hinky when it comes to Windows recognising its presence (Windows is SO crap at the USB thing), but recently, I can’t get it to be recognised at all, on numerous different machines, not just with the user software, but even in Explorer.
It does, however, charge just fine through the USB port when plugged in.
WTF??!??!?[/quote]

Hey chief. I need to know your Windows version and Windows Media Player version. Some really annoying changes relating to recognising USB mp3 players happened around Windows Media Player version 10.[/quote]

W2K v5 Service Pack 4
WMP (not that I ever use it) v9

BFM, Yeah, I tried going straight in, even on other computers, it’s always the same.

[quote=“the chief”]BFM, Yeah, I tried going straight in, even on other computers, it’s always the same.[/quote]And you’ve tried Windows explorer and their own software. Maybe it’s borked. Or the cable’s borked.

I was going to recommend downloading Windows Media Player 10, but looking at this page, there’s something screwy going on: microsoft.com/windows/window … sions.aspx
Windows 2000 isn’t listed at all.

Anyway, this is what happened around version 9/10. They stopped loading the mp3 player as a removable hard drive, and instead loaded it as an MTP Player, or some such nonsense (this also has something to do with the change from 2000 to XP, which happened around the same time). Doesn’t matter if you use WMP or not, it still takes a certain amount of control of your system unfortunately.

Anyway, it might be worth trying to install WMP 10 and see if that helps. If not, you can always uninstall it.

Actually, maybe you would be better off downloading and installing this stuff first: iriverinc.com/support/s_series/s10.aspx

Maybe you could whittle up a new one using chopsticks and a penknife?

Windows is only half of the issue, the product manufacturer also needs drivers that support the OS, (I doubt that its PnP), W2K is too old for support.

Its difficult for comapnies making hardware now, they need to support, Windows Xp, Vista, 32 bit, 64 bit. At a minimum, then Mac, Linux. Old Windows platforms dont get a look in.

The other computers you tried, are they all win2K? What does it do in XP and Vista?

I didn’t know that but I had the same problem and here is how I got it to work.

  1. Go to control panel > system > hardware > device manager.
  2. Look for any yellow question marks especially under usb and drives. Mine shows up as USB mass storage device. (I’m using mediaplayer 9)
  3. Right click on the device and select uninstall.
  4. After uninstalling go to control panel > add hardware.
  5. Let windows scan for new hardware.
  6. Install the driver and your player should be recognized.

All of this should be done with the device plugged into a USB port and turned on.

Hope it works for you.

[quote=“Big Fluffy Matthew”]
Why would you need to let the power run down, that’s a very girly thing to say, I’m guessing it uses Li-ion batteries which don’t suffer from the memory effect. If you let ni-cads (standard AA rechargables), it would probably damage them as one discharges before another and they start charging each other.[/quote]

Works with iPod. I don’t know why, as I have ovaries.

[quote=“Buttercup”][quote=“Big Fluffy Matthew”]
Why would you need to let the power run down, that’s a very girly thing to say, I’m guessing it uses Li-ion batteries which don’t suffer from the memory effect. If you let ni-cads (standard AA rechargables), it would probably damage them as one discharges before another and they start charging each other.[/quote]

Works with iPod. I don’t know why, as I have ovaries.[/quote]Must be something wrong with your iPod, or your ovaries, whatever they are. iPods use lithium-ion batteries and therefore don’t gain from being discharged. In fact discharging and charging would make the battery wear out faster.

apple.com/batteries/

they do however say this:

[quote]For proper maintenance of a lithium-based battery, it’s important to keep the electrons in it moving occasionally. Be sure to go through at least one charge cycle per month[/quote]Maybe that’s what it is.

[quote=“Big Fluffy Matthew”]
Works with iPod. I don’t know why, as I have ovaries.[/quote]Must be something wrong with your iPod, or your ovaries, whatever they are. iPods use lithium-ion batteries and therefore don’t gain from being discharged. In fact discharging and charging would make the battery wear out faster.

apple.com/batteries/[/quote]

Yeees. I understand. But if it is not being recognised, letting the battery drain and then reconnecting usually works. It’s a mystery, isn’t it?

[quote=“Buttercup”][quote=“Big Fluffy Matthew”][quote=“Buttercup”]
Works with iPod. I don’t know why, as I have ovaries.[/quote]Must be something wrong with your iPod, or your ovaries, whatever they are. iPods use lithium-ion batteries and therefore don’t gain from being discharged. In fact discharging and charging would make the battery wear out faster.

apple.com/batteries/[/quote]

Yeees. I understand. But if it is not being recognised, letting the battery drain and then reconnecting usually works. It’s a mystery, isn’t it?[/quote]

That’s probably because the computer inside the iPod reboots. In civilised electronics you could pull the battery out to do the achieve the same thing. Software can get into a bad state and rebooting gets you back into a known good one. In fact regular reboots = more reliability if the software is buggy because it usually takes lots of time to get into those bad states, otherwise they would have been found and fixed during development. I once suggested to a client that they program their point of sale machines to reboot at midnight, which a) they conceded would help a lot but b) daren’t admit to anyone something like that was necessary.

Looks like those ovaries are serving you well in finding workarounds for hard to reproduce bugs in badly engineered embedded systems :slight_smile: