Windows xp lic question? New Q.Which flavor of XP do want?

My Taiwan friend bought the Chinese version of Windows XP OEM. He told me that once registered the program is “mated to that particular mother board”. So, if I buy a new motherboard, I guess I’d have to buy a new license.

I usually installed the same operating system in both my laptop and desktop. When I worked for the years ago, they said you can install your software on both the laptop and desktop if you don’t use them at the same time.

So, tell me…

  1. Is the US version of windows xp OEM PRO restricted to one machine and if you upgrade your machine you’re SOL. Or is this feature limited to Taiwan only.

I’m going to buy the English version of XP PRO OEM later today. Thanks.

When you install it, you have to connect to the internet or call them to activate it. The code you give them contains details about your motherboard, CPU, hard disk and a couple of other things, if you install it on another machine, it will phone home again and say “eh up, I’ve already been installed on another computer”

But saying that, you can make changes to your computer, there is some leeway. As long as you don’t change it everyweek you should be ok. I’ve changed many parts of my computer, including the motherboard (but I did need to call microsoft to reactivate that time), and I’ve never had a problem. You can make a certain numbers of changes to the hardware in a 6(?) month period. After 6 months the counters reset to zero.

You maybe able to install it on another computer every six months, but you could never upgrade them, because then they would phone home.

I’m not sure anyone know exactly how it works, but basically you don’t need to buy a new copy if you upgrade, but you do need a copy for each computer.

And people wonder why Microsoft is so hated. (Or do they?)

Yeah, I currently want to transfer my Windows XP from my PC to my laptop and only use Linux on my PC… and I have to ask those fekkers permission!!!

[quote=“irishstu”]Yeah, I currently want to transfer my Windows XP from my PC to my laptop and only use Linux on my PC… and I have to ask those fekkers permission!!![/quote]Yes, your computer will call Microsoft, but permission will be automatically given unless you’ve done it dozens of times already. There’s confusion about how many times, possibly about six, after that you will have to talk to them in person to explain what you’re mucking about for. I’ve haven’t heard of anyone every having it refused.

The OEM license versions of Windows are intended to be bought by hardware vendors and system integrators so that they can install the OS on their systems before selling them on to customers; for this reason the price is slightly lower than the retail version.

Buying an OEM version to install on a system yourself is a bit of a gray area. It’s not what the license was originally intended for (to help SIs reduce the cost of their systems by taking advantage of bulk purchases). You shouldn’t really be able to obtain an OEM license that is not sold with a complete computer system, but many retailers completely ignore this, or keep within the wording of the law (but not the spirit) by selling it along with a nominal piece of hardware.

Because the OEM version is only supposed to be sold with a complete system the end-user license agreement (EULA) differs slightly with the retail license in that the OEM license is not transferable to another system, whereas if you purchase a retail version you a free to transfer the software to another system as often as you want. Even a pre-bought system can be upgrade though, so (as your friend says) the cut off point as far as Microsoft grants as to what constitutes a different system or just an upgrade is with the motherboard.

Whether you have a retail license or an OEM one, what you are hoping to do is against the terms of the EULA. You can’t install the OEM version on 2 systems (motherboards) and you can’t install the retail version on a second system without removing it from the first system.

In practical terms though most of this is just words. Whether you buy the retail or OEM license you will have to activate it, and if you install on 2 systems you will have to activate twice and need to give a good reason why. The important fact is that Microsoft cannot tell if you are activating again because you are illegally trying to install on another system, or because you have upgraded an item of hardware. As long as you give your reason as, “I have just upgraded my xxxx.” Where xxxx is a piece of hardware but NOT the motherboard you will be able to activate.

In summary:
If you want to be fully legal, buy 2 retail licenses.
If you want to be legal and save some money, buy 2 OEM licenses.
If you want to be legal on one system and have a bit of flexibility in your lies for a little extra expense, get 1 retail license.
If you want to be cheap, get 1 OEM license.

OK… Let me check the facts. I’ll I’m going to order my product about midnight tonight from the states…

Windows XP Professional OEM

*will register my computer’s motherboard and other hardware information

  • I can make reasonable (What ever that is) changes to my machine or a reasonable number of times and it these changes will be automatically approved.

  • I can transfer my Windows to an other system like my laptop but I have to ask permission and prove that I’m removing it from the first CPU

(Is there a legal way to have them it on both my machines, can I purchase a discount lic.?)

Are these assumptions correct? What does Microsoft consider a major change.

I work with large files and play around with multimedia. Sometimes it’s easier to reinstall than trouble shoot. If no change is made to the system will a complete reinstall be allowed?

Upgrading RAM, or peripherals. I switch devices in and out like you may switch a light switch. I love gadgets. Would they consider usb peripherals a major change?

I know, I studpid question but this is Microsoft.

I just saw something in my PC Format about the OEM version of XP being tied to the motherboard. It sounds like you can’t replace the motherboard and keep the same licence. OEM versions are supposed to be sold with a computer, and therefore it can be argued, to be only used on that computer. Maybe Microsoft made it stricter because people were buying the cheaper OEM version…

Ahhh. A new question. I was about to make my purchase on FROOGLE when I learned that there are two flavors of Windows XP Professional

Regular (I assume) and X64. Which one do I want?

I run basically, Office 2000 for students and teachers, older versions of acrobat and photoshop. Besides my video eiditing tools, that’s about it.

My computer is a Pentium 4 @ 3 GHZ.

Regular.

You can skip all this explanation
Windows XP Pro x64 Edition is a 64-bit version (regular is 32-bit).

To run the 64-bit version you need to have a computer in which all the components are 64-bit enabled. This includes the chipset (Intel 925 or higher) CPU (Intel 6XX series or higher) and all your hardware needs to have 64-bit drivers. If you don’t know what you have it’s safer to assume you don’t have all the needed ingredients, WinXP 32-bit can run on any system so even if you coulld potentially use WinXP 64-bit it won’t matter.

If you had a system fully configured for 64-bit you would be able to use software that has been specially written for 64-bit. If you are using software on a system now it is not the 64-bit version so you’d have to obtain (buy again usually) the 64-bit version (if it’s available which in many cases it is not) before you would see any benefit.

64-bit is mainly intended for software that requires lots of memory such as servers, databases, and modeling and design. There are some games that suppport 64-bit but the list is limited and the added features aren’t really worth the extra trouble.

Thanks to all who helped. One more question? On my laptop I’ve the legal copy of windows 2k pro. (I originally illegally or not installed it on my desktop and lap top.)

Since I’m buying windows xp OEM for my Desktop, I was thinking of I could buy the upgrade package for windows xp pro.

If I have to wipe my drive clean, do I have to re-install the old operating system before I run the upgrade disk?

I like to experiment with different software applications and the like and sometimes create an unstable system. I usually prefer to reinstall than to trouble shoot.

[quote=“Taiwan_Student”]If I have to wipe my drive clean, do I have to re-install the old operating system before I run the upgrade disk?[/quote]No, it will ask you to insert your old CD during installation.

The OEM license says that you can only use the installation with the PC it was sold with, but it is not specifically tied to the motherboard. The guidelines are fairly vague, but basically if you are only swapping out one or two items at a time then it is still considered the same system. Whether you need to reactivate or not depends on how many things you switch out at once. If you change more than two things within one month then you will be asked to reactivate. In most cases this will be done automatically. Only if you make very frequent changes will you ever be asked to speak to someone to get reactivated. Supposedly Microsoft only tracks core hardware like motherboard, cpu, memory, non-removable disks and optical drives. USB peripherals and other easily removable hardware are definitely not tracked.

The difference with the retail license is that in addition to upgrading an existing computer, you can transfer the license to a completely different computer later. Thus you could move your license from your desktop to your laptop in your example with the retail version but not the OEM version.

In neither case can you share XP licenses between two different computers at the same time, even if you only use one at a time. Whether you can get away with it or not is a different matter.

“Microsoft small print says a new Windows OEM licence must be purchased if a motherboard is changed or upgraded”

Does anyone know the currect price for Windows XP? (Traditional Chinese Home Edition will do, thanks, though I’m curious about the Pro price too).
Since we’re taking curiosity, how much would an OEM version cost (out of curiosity only, of couse, in case I didn’t mention that already). I’m curious about the difference in price.

Not interested in pirate copy prices.

… unless it is to repair the system. So you better make sure that old motherboard is broken when you replace it. Despite the article, even Microsoft has said different things in the past about whether a motherboard change requires a new license.

I’m only familiar with US pricing, but there it’s around $140-150 for XP Pro OEM, $90-100 for XP Home OEM. XP Pro Retail is around $300.

Just Young is selling XP Home (Trad Chinese) for $3,099NT. XP Pro (Trad Chinese) is $5,250NT. They have two shops on BaDe Rd Sec 1…one at #76 and the other at #82.

Thanks.

[quote=“Rik”]Windows XP Pro x64 Edition is a 64-bit version (regular is 32-bit).

To run the 64-bit version you need to have a computer in which all the components are 64-bit enabled. This includes the chipset (Intel 925 or higher) CPU (Intel 6XX series or higher) and all your hardware needs to have 64-bit drivers. If you don’t know what you have it’s safer to assume you don’t have all the needed ingredients, WinXP 32-bit can run on any system so even if you coulld potentially use WinXP 64-bit it won’t matter.


64-bit is mainly intended for software that requires lots of memory such as servers, databases, and modeling and design. There are some games that suppport 64-bit but the list is limited and the added features aren’t really worth the extra trouble.[/quote]

Tech support has just installed Win XP Pro x64, and suddenly my Epson Perfection 1260 scanner won’t work; apparently Epson doesn’t make and isn’t planning on releasing a driver in the x64 vsn for this.

My question is this – as a typical home user, am I better off balking at the installation of x64 and asking for 32 so my scanner will work, or am I better off running out and buying a new scanner as the price to pay for a supposedly better x64 system? I’m confused.