Words people think are English (eg. High, PK, Fighting)

[quote=“AlexBlackman”][quote=“tatterdemalion”]Alex Case, one of the hardest working bloggers in ELT, has a whole list of Japanese English (Japlish expressions) on his blog:

http://www.tefl.net/alexcase/teach-abroad/asia/japan/a-to-z-of-japanese-english-one/

Maybe someone with enough free time wants to put together an A to Z of Taiwanese English???[/quote]
Hmm… Well… I’m not in Taiwan anymore, so I doubt I’ld be able to.

Maybe, if we keep growing this thread, someone might be able to distill it down to a usable list.

As for me? Well, I’m currently writing a list of words NOT to say in English[/quote]

I believe the administration would be interested in me seeing that, when you’re done.

[quote=“AlexBlackman”]
As for me? Well, I’m currently writing a list of words NOT to say in English[/quote]
How does THAT work? I’m interested, because my feeling is that it would be like a carpenter saying “don’t EVER use that 1/4-inch brad point, because its nasty.” For me, personally, the MORE words people know, the better. 'Part from the chief, of course. The more words THAT bastard knows, the more he’s about to like flap his lips even more than usual. And that.

[quote=“sandman”][quote=“AlexBlackman”]
As for me? Well, I’m currently writing a list of words NOT to say in English[/quote]
How does THAT work? I’m interested, because my feeling is that it would be like a carpenter saying “don’t EVER use that 1/4-inch brad point, because its nasty.” For me, personally, the MORE words people know, the better. 'Part from the chief, of course. The more words THAT bastard knows, the more he’s about to like flap his lips even more than usual. And that.[/quote]
Because they think they are English words. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing and all.

Um… I’ve just thought of another one; AV. In Chinese(and I assume Japanese) it means Adult Video whereas, in English it means Audio-Visual. I couldn’t believe my friends face when I asked him to meet me in the AV section of the library. :blush:

[quote=“sandman”][quote=“AlexBlackman”]
As for me? Well, I’m currently writing a list of words NOT to say in English[/quote]
How does THAT work? I’m interested, because my feeling is that it would be like a carpenter saying “don’t EVER use that 1/4-inch brad point, because its nasty.” For me, personally, the MORE words people know, the better. . . .[/quote]

Well, for instance, one should never say, “Forget you!” :no-no:

[quote=“Mother Theresa”][quote=“sandman”][quote=“AlexBlackman”]
As for me? Well, I’m currently writing a list of words NOT to say in English[/quote]
How does THAT work? I’m interested, because my feeling is that it would be like a carpenter saying “don’t EVER use that 1/4-inch brad point, because its nasty.” For me, personally, the MORE words people know, the better. . . .[/quote]

Well, for instance, one should never say, “Forget you!” :no-no:[/quote]
I had to think about that for a minute… :roflmao:

DIY - self service.
Recycling - where you take your dirty dishes.

“fighting” comes from a Korean drama called Full House (浪漫滿屋) where the main actress alwys says “aja aja Fighting” as an encouragement.

“high” is kind of related to the feeling of being on drugs : they will say something like “the mood is very high” it could be meant as crazy, or over- something.

high is kind of like overexcited, full of energy, I think. Or that’s how we seem to be using it nowadays, it probably did come from the feeling of being on drugs but is used to explain that dizzy, happy, excited feeling (available at parties, when you first fall in love and when you find out some good news after 10 espressos. Either way you can’t sit still!!).

PK in Japan comes from Penalty Kick - a one-on-one between the striker and the goalie. That’s why it’s used for sudden death, one-on-one competitions. (I imagine from popular lexicon in Japan it went into Japanese video games and that’s how it came here; soccer’s not as popular here as in Japan.)

I like ‘call’ (pronounced ‘ko’). As in ‘call我!’

People tend to use the word ‘friendly’ in conversation lately. Or maybe that’s just cause I keep using it, for lack of a decent substitute :smiley:

Here’s a weird one:

Fu. Pronounced “few”. Derived from “feel”. Means “feeling”.

I find this very odd when it’s used by speakers of a language that already has words spelled “fu”.

More I’ve thought of: head shot! Game over! All-in!

Actually, once you’ve got a feeling for the basic words most Taiwanese know, you can start to improvise your own code switch terms.

我覺得她很friendly… 她很sexy. A lot of basic English adjectives will do, or even words that aren’t adjectives in English usage.

Miss the old “justomatic” or “justamato” for “just a moment”

[quote=“Chris”]Here’s a weird one:

Fu. Pronounced “few”. Derived from “feel”. Means “feeling”.

I find this very odd when it’s used by speakers of a language that already has words spelled “fu”.[/quote]
Fu and Feel are good examples

I’ve seen 有feel a few times.

ohhhh I forgot ‘feel’.

You’re supposed to write it ‘feel’ but read it as ‘few’.

Does the phrase “Taiwan Up” fall into this category?

[quote=“Dragonbones”]Not bread per se; rather they use toast to indicate sliced bread (sandwich loaf bread), even when untoasted.[/quote]It’s done here in Sweden as well.

MV for Music Video.

LP for lanpa instead of long play. (pardon my Taiwanese)

[quote=“Chris”]Here’s a weird one:

Fu. Pronounced “few”. Derived from “feel”. Means “feeling”.

I find this very odd when it’s used by speakers of a language that already has words spelled “fu”.[/quote]
It originated from Hong Kong Cantonese. And speaking of which, “fancy” for fans.

I could have sworn that was standard English… 哎呀!I’m forgetting English faster then I’m learning Chinese

[quote=“Incubus”]LP for lanpa instead of long play. (pardon my Taiwanese)

[quote=“Chris”]Here’s a weird one:

Fu. Pronounced “few”. Derived from “feel”. Means “feeling”.

I find this very odd when it’s used by speakers of a language that already has words spelled “fu”.[/quote]
It originated from Hong Kong Cantonese. And speaking of which, “fancy” for fans.[/quote]
Or in Mandarin, “fensi” (which is a kind of noodle). The word has been co-opted to mean “fans”, and also plain singular “fan”, even though it retains the “-si”.

hahahaha… you should try Singlish, 4 - 5 languages in one sentence… apart from the “lehs and lohs”.