Would you neuter someone else's dog?

While walking my own dogs in the park, I encountered a mutt who I believe was lost. He had a really nice leather collar on, as well as a flea and tick collar. He seemed really healthy, and his fur felt rather clean. If he had been lost, it hadn’t been for very long. I checked to see if he was tagged or chipped, but he was neither. Anyway, the male dogs at the park shooed him out, so I took him home briefly, got him cleaned up, and he’s now hanging out at a dog hotel while I search for his family.

I’m rather upset that this dog had no identification because the chances of finding his family now are incredibly slim. I already have two female dogs at home who have very clearly and loudly let him know that he’s are not welcome in our home, and I don’t have the financial means to keep him in a hotel for longer than a week or two. I’m worried that I won’t be able to locate his family before I need to let him go.

I’m preparing myself for the possibility of having to street him after two weeks, but I’m really reluctant to let him go un-neutered. It really bothers me knowing that this dog could get into vicious fights with other male dogs, or get distracted by female scents and then possibly get hit by a car while chasing a bitch in heat. I’m thinking neutering is justifiable because he’s neither tagged nor chipped, basically no one’s dog, and I don’t think it’s responsible to let him go without being neutered. But he’s also not my dog, and knowing how some people here treat dogs like property, I’m paranoid that someone is going to get upset someday and give me hell for it.

Just would like to know what the right thing to do is. I’d appreciate any advice.

Just slip a tight elastic band over his nads and then let him go.

The sad reality is the dog has almost certainly been abandoned. Your chances of finding the people who left him are slim, and of them wanting him back are slimmer. So yes get him fixed. If by chance you do find the family and they ask claim ignorance. Say you brought him to the vet and the vet must have fixed him. You had no idea.

Good luck.

Sure, I would and I have done it before. If the dog had been picked by the fdog catchers and put in a public shelter, he would be dead in a few days. If he was picked up by an animal association, they would immediately have him chipped/vaccinated/neutered if for adoption, or at least neutered if TNR. If the owner appears and complains, tell him there were two choices. You are increasing his life span/health/adoptability/better temper by neutering him. Thank you for caring.

Anyways, when the fur grows, nobody knows what happened until a few months later the results are obvious…

my concern here would be that you picked up a stray and then took it home to the ones you have. it is very humanitarian of you to do, but.
kinda sounds like you were intent on keeping this guy and the kids at home didn’t like the idea?
No I wouldn’t neuter someone’s dog. it could come back and bit you in the long run. even if it seems like the proper thing to do. the vet will rat you out in a second if the dog’s owners are eventually found and it becomes a problem and leave you with the liability if you ordered the operation.
the best thing would be to take care the ones you have, unless you plan to keep that third one, leave him be.

[quote=“justreal”]my concern here would be that you picked up a stray and then took it home to the ones you have. it is very humanitarian of you to do, but.
kinda sounds like you were intent on keeping this guy and the kids at home didn’t like the idea?
No I wouldn’t neuter someone’s dog. it could come back and bit you in the long run. even if it seems like the proper thing to do. the vet will rat you out in a second if the dog’s owners are eventually found and it becomes a problem and leave you with the liability if you ordered the operation.
the best thing would be to take care the ones you have, unless you plan to keep that third one, leave him be.[/quote]

The dog is untagged and unchipped so there is no way to distinguish it from a stray. The city could just have easily picked it up and neutered is (they do do CNR in places). Please don’t make the OP paranoid. There is nothing the owners can do if he fixes the dog. If they make a fuss (soooo unlikely) he can threaten to report them for animal neglect. That will shut them up quick.

[quote=“justreal”]my concern here would be that you picked up a stray and then took it home to the ones you have. it is very humanitarian of you to do, but.
kinda sounds like you were intent on keeping this guy and the kids at home didn’t like the idea?
No I wouldn’t neuter someone’s dog. it could come back and bit you in the long run. even if it seems like the proper thing to do. the vet will rat you out in a second if the dog’s owners are eventually found and it becomes a problem and leave you with the liability if you ordered the operation.
the best thing would be to take care the ones you have, unless you plan to keep that third one, leave him be.[/quote]

I made it pretty clear before that I was only temporarily caring for him until I’ve found his family or until the two weeks were up, so I’m not really sure what the concern is about. I am absolutely letting him go when that time comes. I’ve already had the experience of having more than two dogs in my house before, and it was too much for me to handle. I have no intention of ever adopting this dog or any other in the future as long as I’m living in Taiwan with my two dogs. I was only thinking of letting him stay at my place for the two weeks while I search for his family because it would’ve saved me a one to two thousand dollars in hotel costs.

And would the vet necessarily be able to rat me out if this dog was never tagged or in anyway identifiable? Like I said, as far as the vets I’ve already seen are concerned, he’s no one’s dog. And his previous owner wasn’t responsible enough to tag/chip him, leash him, or neuter him, so neutering him at the very least would be doing him a favor.

Let me tell you a story: My local vet recognized my dog from the time I took him there for the first look after I found him, but realizing he had been dumped and knowing he was neglected and possibly abused the vet shut up and let me keep it -I thought he was a stray.

Hence I think any vet is more likely to act in the best interest of the doggie and consider he’s in better hands unless the owners have been desperately looking for doggie. That would be the only case he would say: “ohm, but XiaoHei’s owners’ are So and so, and they are so distraught!”. I do not see them vets making a fuss about neutering, since most are quite for it. As said, even as a stray, neutered is better. The vet won’t “rat you out”, you are not doing anything wrong, you are not the one who misplaced the dog. There is nothing wrong with “fixing” the doggie. That is why it is called “fixing”.

If you were like, removing a leg or a kidney from the dog, by all means, be “ratted out”. But you are taking care of the dog, and there is no ID. Doggie is a stray by all official accounts. No one, vet or cop or lizhang or curious neighbor would object.

Is the vet in Xijr still doing the free CNR for stray dogs? You could take it there and have them “make” the decision.

YES, I would. :slight_smile:

Facts about Pet Overpopulation in the U.S.:
It is impossible to determine how many stray dogs and cats live in the United States; estimates for cats alone range up to 70 million.
The average number of litters a fertile cat produces is one to two a year; average number of kittens is 4-6 per litter.
The average number of litters a fertile dog produces is one a year; average number of puppies is 4-6.
Owned cats and dogs generally live longer, healthier lives than strays.
Most strays are lost pets who were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.
Only ten percent of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered. About 75 percent of owned pets are neutered.
The cost of spaying or neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for a year.
Five out of ten dogs in shelters and seven out of ten cats in shelters are destroyed simply because there is no one to adopt them.
(stats from aspca.org)

Get it fixed. Even if you do find the owners and they are angry initially they will probably be happier in the long run. I really don’t understand this general objection to fixing pets in Taiwan (AFAIK).

Save your money and neuter a female stray instead.

All these scenarios that you’ve dreamed up about him getting into fights and chasing female dogs are going to happen regardless of whether or not he’s been neutered.

Your female dogs don’t like him. Not because he’s too macho, but because he’s a strange dog invading their home.

The male dogs at the park don’t like him. Not because he’s too macho, but because he’s a strange dog invading their home. The dog you have doesn’t sound too aggressive anyway, so unless you’re planning on giving him a sex change and hormone replacements so that he turns into an alluring female dog, the guys at the park are still going to kick his ass whether he has balls or not.

If he doesn’t know to watch for cars, he’s going to get hit whether he’s neutered or not once you put him back on the street.

I hope you’ve put up lost dog posters everywhere around the park and at all the vets around the area. Or else the longer he stays in that dog hotel while you’re deciding what to do with him, the more likely his owners are going to give up on actively looking for him.

Also, I’ve never seen a stray with a flea collar on. People who dump are usually unwilling to spend the extra money for a flea collar. He might be someone’s storefront dog that just roams though, hence the need for the flea collar.

Anyway, IMO if he’s non-agressive and you’ve got money to burn on neutering strays, you should really take that money and subsidize neutering a female dog (s). That way you’ll be preventing the birth of thousands of potential puppies and their potiential puppies and their potential puppies, instead of just easing your conscience before placing a stray back on the street.

Neuter him, as it prevents all manner of antisocial behaviour.

If you take him in, I will come and give you a free 2.5-hour lesson on how to get your dogs and the new guy getting along just fine.

Sean 0920 620 109