Zunliao Pub. Elem Sch & Cho Yaun Sijou via Dewy Int. NO GO!

Ok, I am currently employed at Zunliao (or Zun Liao ?) Public Elementary School and Cho Yuan Public Elementary School in Sijou, Taiwan. My guess is Dewy International is trying to recruit a new teacher for these schools as I write.

I have to be frank. These schools are not ready for a Western teacher. I am afraid I can not recommend you work in them for many reasons. I guess I will later post in detail, but let me say they seem to have trouble with the contract, paid me late, and generally have some social issues they should cope with before they hire another teacher for their English Classes. In short it was a poor working environment where I felt unvalued. Ask yourself this question: do you want to work in a school office with teachers who asked you to please not speak English in the office as it disturbs them? I don’t; but I am sticking it out to honor my agreements, and I did like the children.

Never the less, I must advise against anyone from pursing this teaching position. If you have questions you can PM me. In August when the contract is over perhaps I will come out with entire saga resulting from the hubris that brought me here…

I can’t guess your ?? pinyin. Where is “Sijou”?

Sijou is around 4 miles from Bedou, which is about 20 miles south of Chunghua. My spelling may be wrong but the famed and beautiful metropolises of Yunlain and Tainjung are also nearby- both of which have rail connections.

apologies apologies it is Cho Yang NOT Cho Yuan opps sorry :blush:

Well I am taking the last week of July off unpaid, after much negotiation that since I am only teaching nine days of English Camp I would rather have some unpaid vacation than come to school and do nothing for the money. So, I guess you can add obtuse to the list of issues as well :wink:

Sijou? Bedou? Yunlain? Chunghua? Tainjung? Are you sure you’re in Taiwan? I’ve lived here since 1989, with four years down south, and I have no idea where any of these places are!

Play nice, Maoman! :laughing:

Here’s a handy guide:

Sijou = 溪州鄉 (Xizhou)
Bedou = 北斗鎮 (Beidou)
Yunlain = 員林鎮 (Yuanlin)
Chunghua = 彰化市 (Zhanghua)
Tainjung = 田中鄉 (Tianzhong)

All places in the delightful heidao heartland of Zhanghua County (彰化縣).

The schools Isildur is talking about are the Zunliao Elementary and the Chaoyang Elementary (the school also uses the Suibian Pinyin of “Cho Yang”). Links provided so people can check out their websites to see the places he is warning of.

By the way, kudos to the man for sticking it out down there. Doesn’t sound like fun.

[quote=“Taffy”]The schools Isildur is talking about are the Zunliao Elementary and the Chaoyang Elementary (the school also uses the Suibian Pinyin of “Cho Yang”). Links provided so people can check out their websites to see the places he is warning of.

By the way, kudos to the man for sticking it out down there. Doesn’t sound like fun.[/quote]

Holy crap those places look scary. The kids look bored and unhappy and the class websites, at least at Chaoyang look like either a showcase for the teachers (i.e. the 6th grade teacher who put up her wedding picture) or borderline on creepy like the fifth grade teacher’s extensive collection pictures of the girls in their bathing suits including them bending over and one of their backsides while kicking in the water (oh and the one of the boy vomiting into his hand).

The classrooms look like the storage room for a defunct, pre-1950’s science lab rather than elementary school classrooms. I don’t think those schools are ready for kids, let alone English classes.

Don’t tell me this is what elementary schools are like here. What on earth do those kids learn?

[quote=“ImaniOU”]Holy crap those places look scary. The kids look bored and unhappy and the class websites, at least at Chaoyang look like either a showcase for the teachers (i.e. the 6th grade teacher who put up her wedding picture) or borderline on creepy like the fifth grade teacher’s extensive collection pictures of the girls in their bathing suits including them bending over and one of their backsides while kicking in the water (oh and the one of the boy vomiting into his hand).

The classrooms look like the storage room for a defunct, pre-1950’s science lab rather than elementary school classrooms. I don’t think those schools are ready for kids, let alone English classes.

Don’t tell me this is what elementary schools are like here. What on earth do those kids learn?[/quote]

To be fair, my school has similar pictures, but I still think it’s a great place. It’s just that sometimes good teachers are really horrible photographers! :laughing: I’ve been embarrassed on more than one occasion by the shots my co-teacher sends to parents where the kids look like they’re asleep or the center of the picture is my behind. :s A lot of times, they just take a lot of pictures and load all of them. They don’t have enough time to edit or sort them, and they haven’t been trained to compose the shots well.

Just saying…

His school might be terrible, but I wouldn’t draw my conclusions from the pictures alone.

[quote=“Persephone”][quote=“ImaniOU”]Holy crap those places look scary. The kids look bored and unhappy and the class websites, at least at Chaoyang look like either a showcase for the teachers (i.e. the 6th grade teacher who put up her wedding picture) or borderline on creepy like the fifth grade teacher’s extensive collection pictures of the girls in their bathing suits including them bending over and one of their backsides while kicking in the water (oh and the one of the boy vomiting into his hand).

The classrooms look like the storage room for a defunct, pre-1950’s science lab rather than elementary school classrooms. I don’t think those schools are ready for kids, let alone English classes.

Don’t tell me this is what elementary schools are like here. What on earth do those kids learn?[/quote]

To be fair, my school has similar pictures, but I still think it’s a great place. It’s just that sometimes good teachers are really horrible photographers! :laughing: I’ve been embarrassed on more than one occasion by the shots my co-teacher sends to parents where the kids look like they’re asleep or the center of the picture is my behind. :s A lot of times, they just take a lot of pictures and load all of them. They don’t have enough time to edit or sort them, and they haven’t been trained to compose the shots well.

Just saying…

His school might be terrible, but I wouldn’t draw my conclusions from the pictures alone.[/quote]

Yes, but even the worst photographer can’t make a classroom look like an unused storage room. I mean if I had to spend even one day a week here “learning”, I’d hate school.

On your comments:

Thanks for the lesson in phonics and Romanization of Mandarin (or Taiwanese?)… I just see the green highway signs that read “Sijou” so I just spell it like they do but your spelling is probably more accurate. How do you spell “Tim-Bootong?” No, no it is better to list all the possible names. Well as I said, the kids were great. And yes- I guess the classrooms were not brand new. As to the kids looking bored or unhappy- what kid that age does not get a bit tired of all the: “Smile for the school home page!” pictures.

I just found out today they will not pay all my bonus- even though I was assured in the early months to not worry about it. So much for oral trust. Monday I will go to the immigration office and point out that I was: paid late one time, not given all my vacation days, made to make up the classes I missed on my sick days, and not to be paid all the bonus they said not to worry about. Also, I will explain I want my last pay stub mailed to me. I am not sure why the school thinks it an exotic task to supply me with a monthly salary statement- because my government tax office will certainly demand them.

I feel sorry for the next Native English teacher who takes this job. Well maybe it would be ok if they were thoroughly fluent in Mandarin, but chances are they would still get stiffed on some pay at in the end like me. I have an extremely thick skin and do not take slights personally. The last two teachers who worked this job and quit may have too and just decided their talents and credentials would be better served elsewhere. I was a bemused by a Taiwanese discounting the last teacher’s claim he could work anywhere in Taiwan- then later finding out he did indeed find another Public school job almost instantly. I guess a Teaching License from your Native country has weight in Taiwan. At any rate, I wish the children and the teachers; even the administration, well. In the future, I hope the later can learn some fairness and social skills.