Proposals for Taiwanese flag


#101

I’ve been meaning to post this photo for some time, but was looking for the appropriate thread:

The building is in Taidong, at the corner of Baosang and Guangdong Roads, one block from DPP headquarters. But as far as I know, it’s not officially connected with the DPP.

Unfortunately, the flags on the roof aren’t too clear because it was a windless day. Anyway, two of them are variations of the Republic of Taiwan flag. The other two are clearly the Japanese and American flags.

For those who can’t read Chinese, the horizontal sign says:

Taiwan Government, Taidong (Taiwan People’s Government) Ilan-Hualian-Taidong State Administrative Office

As the sign indicates, there are other branch offices of the “Taiwan People’s Government” in Ilan and Hualian. Probably elsewhere too, I imagine.

From what I’ve been told, this office is where you would go to apply for your ROT ID card and passport, among other things. I’ve never seen any applicants lining up to do this though. As for the two foreign flags on the roof, I understand that the office also doubles as a consulate for Japan and the USA, since both countries enjoy diplomatic relations with the ROT.

I presume that the purpose of this is to show the world that there is no ROC, only an ROT.

I suppose that everyone is entitled to a fantasy, but I find this pretty silly, or perhaps “pathetic” would be a better word. But I’m sure that there are some of you who are having an orgasm over this. Well, go ahead and shred your ROC-issued ARC (or ID card, if you’re a citizen) and apply for your ROT documents. Don’t be surprised if the only country that recognizes those passports is Sealand.


#102

[quote=“Dog’s_Breakfast”]I’ve been meaning to post this photo for some time, but was looking for the appropriate thread:

The building is in Taidong, at the corner of Baosang and Guangdong Roads, one block from DPP headquarters. But as far as I know, it’s not officially connected with the DPP.

Unfortunately, the flags on the roof aren’t too clear because it was a windless day. Anyway, two of them are variations of the Republic of Taiwan flag. The other two are clearly the Japanese and American flags.
[/quote]

I redrew those flags in vetor graphics for my Taiwanese flag design group:
plus.google.com/u/0/communities … 6796567434


Flag of USMG, Taiwan. USMG, Taiwan is supposed to work in concert with TCG, Taiwan Civil Government, modeled after what they have on Guam.

The flag design is based on USAF roundel, Japanese red sun, and the map of Taiwan.


Flag of TCG, Taiwan Civil Government. TCG claims their establishment of TCG and USMG, Taiwan, is in accordance with the Treaty of San Francisco and international law, and is what should have happened after the treaties were signed. TCG believes that the Japan’s emperor has Taiwan’s sovereignty and the US is the principle occupying power of Taiwan. As such, American president has the obligation to normalize Taiwan’s status under UN Charter and Elements of International Law.

The flag design is based on US star, part of the USAF roundel, Japanese red sun, and the map of Taiwan.

It is important to note that TCG doesn’t directly seek Taiwanese Independence. Their goal is to become like Guam or post-war Okinawa first, and then perhaps pursue independence via referendum under US protection.

Therefore, I think what Dog’s_Breakfast said is incorrect. You cannot get a ROT passport from TCG. You can probably get a TCG national ID card. Based on TCG’s claims, I’d imagine people of TCG will need to get US passports, like the Chamorro and other resident of Guam.

There’s another group, called TGUSA, that later split with TCG, which seeks Taiwanese Independence, and was kicked out of TCG because for TCG, directly seeking Taiwan Independence is treason…

Flag of TGUSA. TGUSA basically follows the same line of logic as TCG, but they down play the significance of Japanese sovereignty and bypass the USMG part, jumping straight for an independent government.

The design features the US star, part of the USAF roundel, the 13 stripes of the US flag, inverted Japanese sun, and the map of Taiwan.


#103

I somehow missed out on this news:
news.ltn.com.tw/news/life/breakingnews/1126714

A teacher at Zhuanghua City’s Pinghe elementary school thought it’d be a great exercise for kids to design a flag that they feel represents Taiwan to celebrate 10/10 ROC day.

on an unrelated news, New Zealand will hold a referendum on whether or not to change the flag in 2015 and 2016. The 2015 election will pick a favorite alternative flag, and in 2016 they will decide whether or not to replace the current flag with the previously chosen alternative. Seems like a brilliant way to go.
cbc.ca/news/world/new-zealan … -1.2816603


#104

my little google plus design Taiwanese flag community is actually picking up. I mean, I have a couple people actually sharing their flag designs. Since I made sure all images shared would be CC licensed, I’d like to share some of them.

Shared by a poster named Lin Zhungda. plus.google.com/u/0/+%E6%9E%97% … gJstuFQzag

Lin said green represents national consciousness. Yellow represents balanced development. Blue represents liberty and equality. White represents everlasting peace.

I liked it a lot and incorporated it into the community’s avartar. In order to do that I re-did the flag myself, and found the proportions of colors interesting. Imagine the white back ground as 6 units in width. Draw a 4-unit blue rectangle at the center, then draw a 2-unit yellow rectangle at the center, finally a 1-unit green rectangle at the center. Done. Simple and actually great to look at.

Shared by a poster named Chen Shuzhi. plus.google.com/u/0/10108080091 … bwKRwHWeuU

I also re-did the flag, and modified the colors a little. I think he liked my color modifications, because in subsequent discussions when we were trying a rhombus at the center, I used his original more florescent colors, and was asked to use a darker green instead.

This is my most recent design. I was inspired by sofun’s previous green cross flag, and then saw Australia’s Eureka flag and figured I could do the same to sofun’s flag, but replace the common wealth stars with Aboriginal mata. Well, in the end I wasn’t quite feeling it with the green, and I tried many versions of green… So I went back to the original Eureka blue. As for what should go in the middle of the cross, and the size of it, I also fiddled with that a lot. In the end I thought this version looks alright.


#105

Go with something simple. A Formosan black bear to represent both Taiwan and environmental awareness.

If we want to promote more liberal idealism (why not?), we could put a rainbow behind it. Let’s wait to see how the Legislative Yuan handles the same-sex marriage bill before making such a jump, though.


#106

In that case a black flag with a white V probably would do.

well, if they can capture the analog and translucent essence of actual rainbows, then I’m all for it.


#107

thanks. maybe reserve the mata for elements insignia, emblem or government or royal seal? I really feel there is no better design than the one I proposed.


#108

oh oh, you are right! The Japanese era emblem would be a great use here. I’ll work on a version when I have time.

I’m pretty sure that’s how every designer feels about their proposal. That’s why I thought a community to built consensus would be a good idea.


#109

Some of those would make great provincial flags.


#110

i’ve been told some of them looks like royal seals from some games.


#111

I’ve been told some of them looks like royal seals from some games.[/quote]

yes. On the other hand, my design is for real. There is no better one.


#112

I can see this will become a very productive discussion.


#113

I can see this will become a very productive discussion.[/quote]
I’m quite confident that there is no better one. If you see any please let me know.


#114

I’m quite confident that there is no better one. If you see any please let me know.[/quote]

I’m still not convinced having a cross in Taiwan’s flag has any cultural or spiritual significance to Taiwan’s past or its people in the present. Perhaps your religious belief lead you to feel the use of a cross absolute appropriate.

If a simple cross is all that’s needed, I think by removing the map of Taiwan from the DPP’s flag would also make a perfect candidate for the Taiwanese flag. In the beginning DPP had most of its support from presbyterian churches, which was why such a flag as advocated. There were people within the DPP who finds it inappropriate as well. Your non religious reasoning of having a cross on the flag is exactly the same as ones given by Christians within the DPP.


#115

I would suggest no Euro-derived motif at all.
Looks pretentious and damn silly, in an Asian environment. Stay well clear of heraldry.

Focus on what little situational identity might actually be.


#116

I think if we’re going 本土 it should be 本土 all the way. Formosan black bears (I like the idea of a white V on a black flag), 百步蛇, the peak of Yushan… anything related to nature.


#117

[quote=“TheGingerMan”]I would suggest no Euro-derived motif at all.
Looks pretentious and damn silly, in an Asian environment. Stay well clear of heraldry.

Focus on what little situational identity might actually be.[/quote]

What do you want, a dragon with illegible Chinese characters?

How about a pentagon. I’m sure a pentagon is not european at all.

Since when did white people copy-righted a cross?


#118

Very Asian.


#119

I’d love to see animals on sports uniform too, or embedded in an emblem or coat-of-arm.

Indonesian emblem according to wiki. How pretentious right?


#120

The perfectly fine emblem of Singapore. Also very pretentious because its Euro-derived and is lacking a dragon.
Don’t forget their flag’s got a moon and several pentagons, which are not religious at all. not at all.