Sao Tome switches to China


#1

Foreign Minister David Lee (李大維) on Wednesday expressed deep regret at the decision by Sao Tome and Principe to terminate diplomatic ties with the Republic of China.

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201612210003.aspx


#2

Where is São Tomé and why is it not underwater already?


#3

Dr Lee said Taiwan was “not able to satisfy the nation’s (Sao Tome) huge financial gap”, adding that Taipei will not indulge in “dollar diplomacy”.

Taiwan had reportedly rejected Sao Tome’s request for NT$6.4 billion (S$289,248) in financial aid.

While Dr Lee did not confirm the figure, he said it was “astronomical” for a nation with a population of some 150,000.

Yeah well if their idea of “diplomatic ties” is “F*** Y** GIVE ME MONEYZ” I can’t blame the Taiwanese Government.

I’m sure this will have a strong influence in the Taiwanese economy though, with Sao Tome being such a key center for economical trade. I’m not sure how Taiwan will manage to self-sustain without imports/exports from that island, but only time will tell.


#4

Google Maps works quickly!


#5

They were probably on their way out the door anyway, so figured it was worth a try. Why not?


#6

I am confused about which money conversion unit they use:

6,400,000,000 TWD =
199,722,635.32 USD

Pity. Almost had beaten down malaria there.


#7

The beaches there look awesome. I wonder if the visa on arrival program for ROC citizens is being cancelled.


#8

Must be tough if you are on a scholarship from there and wake up to this news.

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201612210012.aspx

Taiwan Scholarship suspended after São Tomé-Taiwan ties cut

“Without the funding, students can still finish their studies and receive an academic degree or complete Mandarin language courses, but must do so at their own expense, the ministry said.”


#9

When Beijing courts these small countries, does it offer scholarships as part of the deal?


#10

Nevertheless, the Vatican, unlike secular nations, does not require financial aid, Lee said.

Well, that’s a relief! :smiley:


#11

I think they do but if I recall there can be a delay to access funds…hence massive headache for the students!


#12

Tsai admin should take all these funds for their Go South policy instead…always a waste if money and time.


#13

haha another one bites the dust, keep the list coming.


#14

Usually it does. When teh ol country accepted the bribe, I mean, cut relations, the students who were studying here were told by our 4th world government they could continue their studies in China… Lo and behold, scholarships went to the usual offspring of the elite, sons and daughters of legislators, ministers, etc.


#15

None of the nations that has recognized Taiwan can really be counted on really…more than half was bribed or has some sort of monetary interests. When it comes down to it, do you really expect them lend any sort of aid in the event of a chinese invasion?


#16

To be rejected by people this unimportant can’t be good for the ego, but that’s the risk you run when you throw away your self respect.

What was the point of all these pissant allies-for-hire anyway? Face saving? If so, it failed.

Now trade partners… that’s another thing. Not sure how a remote flyspeck on the map will serve that purpose, however.

The Donald is making noises like he might ditch the ChiComs for Taiwan, unless China shows some respect. Taiwan promoted from an irrelevancy to an apex in a triangulation scheme.

Or - just maybe - a seat on the UN Security Council. Lots of face gained there, even if the UN is a rather pretentious organization.

A lot of my US friends barely know Taiwan exists. I haven’t had opportunity to ask them if they’ve heard of Sao Tome.


#17

Can’t blame them. Who doesn’t like a tropical island filled with caocao, and coffee trees.

In terms of experiences with colonialism, the two countries actually have a good deal in common. So it’s sad to see a good friendship go.

Taiwan gave Sao Tome a power plant, built Trindade, the best high school on the islands. Prior to 2003, malaria was prevalent on the islands. With the assistance of Taiwan’s medical team, infection rate dropped to between 4% and 5%.

The president of Malawi once expressed regret over their switch, claiming that China failed to deliver its promises. So I hope China deliver its promises to assist Sao Tome, and the people of Sao Tome will see the benefit of the switch.


#18

Don’t know what Taiwan gets out of any of these deals…nothing really.
Saving money is right.