Working permit (internship)


#1

I want to do an internship for 5 months. I found that out that I first have to get a work permit and then apply for a visitor visa again (I currently have a visitor visa because I was studying at the CLC)
My question is, where can my employer get a work permit? She never did this before because I am the first foreigner at their company.
Is there any website or hotline that my employer can call for my information?


#2

Start contacting the council of labour relations. They will show you the way. I think it is actually processed by MOEA.

We recently brought an intern aboard, and the process was not especially tough, the most important is the documentation that you will be a student while you are an intern. They did not ask for certifications of documents or any of that crap, it went fast and smooth.

If you are here on the right type of visa, you do not need to leave the country, our intern was not, so he had to go to Hong Kong.


ARC Question: How to get an Internship in Taiwan when you are on a Dependent ARC
#3

Thank you so much!! :slight_smile:


#4

[quote=“Mr He”]Start contacting the council of labour relations. They will show you the way. I think it is actually processed by MOEA.

We recently brought an intern aboard, and the process was not especially tough, the most important is the documentation that you will be a student while you are an intern. They did not ask for certifications of documents or any of that crap, it went fast and smooth.

If you are here on the right type of visa, you do not need to leave the country, our intern was not, so he had to go to Hong Kong.[/quote]
The CLA is now the Ministry of Labor, and the subordinate unit that handles work permits is the Workforce Development Agency. But you may be right about the MOEA.


#5

[quote=“cherryblossom153”]I want to do an internship for 5 months. I found that out that I first have to get a work permit and then apply for a visitor visa again (I currently have a visitor visa because I was studying at the CLC)
My question is, where can my employer get a work permit? She never did this before because I am the first foreigner at their company.
Is there any website or hotline that my employer can call for my information?[/quote]

The guys above are right about what department you have to contact about work permits.

I’ve never had to go through the process of applying for a work permit as an intern, however, if it’s anything like an alien residency card/full-time job work permit, this is something that your employer must apply for you and can be a tedious.

All in all, the company is the one sponsoring you to work in Taiwan, the person that will be in charge of you probably appreciates you helping out and doing some research, but they should have an HR rep that should be either helping you or going through the process for you.

Good luck!


#6

Had had two interns in my office. One is a German national, another is a Spanish national. In both cases, they are using visitor visa when entering Taiwan.
Both were spending around 5 months in the company.
You may or may not get paid for the internship. (depends on the company)

Before you arrive in Taiwan, you need to make sure that:

  1. you are registered as a student. throughout the internship period
  2. your nationality belongs to the “permitted” ones.
    (Nationals of Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Poland, and Slovakia using multiple entry visitor visa valid for 1 year)
    (Nationals of UK using single entry resident visa valid for 3 months)
    (Nationals of Austrian using multiple entry visitor visa valid for 6 months)

Details see this link
http://www.boca.gov.tw/public/Data/61291164471.pdf


#7

That’s for the working holiday visa (aka youth mobility) program. If you have the visa (visitor visa with working holiday endorsement), you don’t need a work permit to work legally, and you don’t need to be a student to work legally. Depending on your nationality, you may have a maximum employment period per employer that’s shorter than the duration of the visa. You may also have a maximum duration of study, if you want to study.

The WHV needs to be applied for with the right application form and supplementary documents (health check etc.) in the country of your citizenship. Your TECO or equivalent can provide more information, and you can also search for the thread about it here.


#8

This is correct. You got the visa, you could do anything for a few months.

You sure about this? Both of the interns in my company were made to acquire a letter from their university as a sign of them registered as student.


#9

[quote=“arcticsquid, post:8, topic:89035”]
You sure about this? Both of the interns in my company were made to acquire a letter from their university as a sign of them registered as student.
[/quote]Not required by the Ministry of Labor for holders of a working holiday visa.


#10

Why the company asked them for that, I don’t know. Did they have some kind of deal with the government, like funding for the internship program? It’s always nice to have an employee you don’t need to pay…

Oh wait, did these interns get paid at all?


#11

[quote]Why the company asked them for that, I don’t know. Did they have some kind of deal with the government, like funding for the internship program? It’s always nice to have an employee you don’t need to pay…

Oh wait, did these interns get paid at all?[/quote]

I don’t know. But I think the interns trying to know more about Asia? It’s basically “working holiday”, like many Taiwanese done in Australia in recent years.
Taiwanese picking cherries/apples in Australia, those foreigners making coffee in Taiwan. :smiley:

The company hiring them not required to pay them. But, usually they did.


#12

Oh, of course. They want to evade the minimum wage and use the “student” thing as protection. I’m not sure if that’s legit or not.


#13

This thread explains a little bit.