APRC Application Procedures (Official Checklist)

Going through a channeler like National Background Check Inc. shaves the time down from four months to about one week. If you are limited on time, then it’s the way to go. It’s $45 USD instead of the $18 the FBI charges to go directly through them, but it is worth it if you are under a time constraint.

[quote=“Northcoast Surfer”][quote=“dicernthetruth”][quote=“Northcoast Surfer”][quote=“dicernthetruth”]The procedure to apply APRC Plum blossom card is very simple.

First thing you need to know is, application procedure and documents needed to apply APRC PLUM BLOSSOM CARD IS different from APRC. Technically speaking, you need nothing but application form, educational documents and work experience certificates. I consumed 10 minutes to apply APRC PBC.

Step 1:

Just fill out the application form (same as APRC) and hand over to local immigration office with your documents (Academic, work experience certificates). Your field of study should be in designated areas as mentioned in APRC plum blossom card section, for instance, ICT ( Information and Communication Technologies) field with proven academic excellence ( International award, book, etc.,)

Step 2: Your case officer will contact you to introduce himself.

Step 3: Wait for a call from your case officer. Mine took 6 months.

To apply this APRC you do not need job offer in Taiwan.[/quote]

  1. Are there any residency requirements to apply for the APRC through the Plum Blossom program? Were you previously living and working in Taiwan before you applied? If you had been living and working in Taiwan before you applied, how long had that been?

[color=#4000FF]I have studied in Taiwan (2004-2009) and no previous work experience in Taiwan but currently I am working(since 2011 Oct) in Taiwan. Technically speaking, no need to have any residence permit but preferable. Plz see here immigration.gov.tw/ct.asp?xI … 32316&mp=2[/color]

  1. Were there any financial requirements or was it only just educational and work experience?

[color=#4000FF]No need to show your money( if you apply through investment immigrant plan then you may need) but your brain. You have to show your achievements in the field as mentioned in APRC PBC section. Educational and work experience documents are basic requirements. I forgot to tell you that you need Health certificate too[/color]
[/quote]

It might be helpful for you;

2.Prospective applicants:
b Senior professionals needed in Taiwan with one of the following qualifications:

 	[u]a.	Having professional skills in emerging industries, key technologies, key components or products.[/u]

 	[u]b.	Having special and rare talents for the technical research and development of a technical institution, with remarkable achievement in nano and micro electro-mechanical systems, optoelectronics, information and communications technology, automation system integration, applied materials technology, high precision sensing technology, biotechnology, resource development or energy conservation technology and advance fundamental research that are badly needed in Taiwan and cannot be easily developed in a short time.[/u]

 	[u]c.	Having exclusive and rare talents for management or remarkable achievement in highway, high-speed rail, subway system,telecommunications, aviation, shipping, deep-water construction,meteorology, seismology, etc, that are badly needed in Taiwan and cannot be easily developed in a short time.[/u]

 	[u]d.	Having special capability in science, research, industry and commerce that offer effective and substantial benefits to Taiwan’s economy, industry and education or welfare and are needed by employers in Taiwan.[/u]

 	[u]e.	Being the current or former adjunct professor, professor, associate professor, assistant professor of domestic or foreign universities, or the researcher, associate researcher or assistant researcher of a research institution, or having a doctoral degree or having received an international academic award, or having written a specialized book or having engaged in research at a research institution or having conducted technical research and development at a technical institution or having been involved in management for over four years.[/u]

 	f.	Having achieved exceptional accomplishments and won international recognition for research and development that can upgrade Taiwan’s industry.

 	g.	[color=#FF0000]Having won a place among the top three in an event of the Olympic Game or having won the first place in the Asian Game, or having ever coached a national sports team whose members have ever won a place among the top five in an event of the Olympic Game or among the top 3 in the Asian Game, boosting the capability of Taiwan’s athletes.[/color]

 	h.	Having won the[u][color=#FF0080] first place of an internationally recognized contest, or appraisal, in specialized area such as cultural art, technology, sport, or industry.[/b]
[/color][/u]
  1. Required documents:
    (3) Senior professionals and investment immigrants applying for an Alien Permanent Resident Card (Plum Blossom Card) shall furnish the following documents:
    a. An application form:
    (a) Please obtain the application form from the local municipal, county (city) NIA service center, or by downloading the form from the NIA website (immigration.gov.tw) and printing it in A4 size.
    (b) Please attach a color photo to the application form. (Same format as used on the ID Card)
    b. The original and photocopy of the passport. (The original will be returned after verification.)
    c. The Health Examination Certificate issued within the past three months by a hospital in Taiwan: the health examination form used by major hospitals shall be the Mandatory Examination Items for Health Examination Certificate (Form B) promulgated by the National Health Agency of the Executive Yuan.
    d. Fee: NT$10,000.00, shall be paid upon notification of approval.

[b]Attention:

Any application for the Alien Permanent Resident Card (Plum Blossom Card) under the terms of being a senior professional needed in Taiwan is not subject to the requirement regarding the period of residency. Instead, prior to the meeting held by the Exit, Entry, and Immigration Case Evaluation Committee, the applicant shall request the competent authority in charge of related business to provide review comments that will be compiled and forwarded to the review committee. If the review finds that the applicant’s qualifications are satisfactory, the Alien Permanent Resident Card (Plum Blossom Card) may be granted.[/b][/quote]

Thank you for the information. A very nice contribution to the forum. And once more, congratulations on your APRC. :bow:
Don’t forget to apply for your Open-Work Permit.[/quote]

Thank you once again. :bow:

Soon I have 5 years of JFRV and an ARC based on my JFRV.
As far as I know I am able to apply for an PARC, but here is my problem.
Sorry, due to time I rally don’t want to go through the previous 77 pages and I
hope someone can give me a helpful reply here.

The thing is, I have not worked here (officially) at all, so I don’t have any
tax records. That means I did private tutoring under the table.

Can I still apply for an PARC ?
The truth is my partner has a very good job and basically supported me,
but I really don’t know if the immigration officer will accept that …
I even can’t say I lived entirely from my savings as I don’t have official
documents like changing money at banks etc …

So, which documents do they need to see ?
Is there still a chance to get an PARC ?

Does it make a difference we have a newborn child in our family ?

I would look at page one of this thread. It is updated and current. That will get you started. Then I would go to your local office to verify that you are eligible prior to collecting all the documentation.

I saw in a previous thread back in 2008 about the subject of “breaks” and that people were having APRCs approved even though they had taken a break between ARCs, due to the fact they had been living legally on an ARC for 5 consecutive years, and had been in TW for 183+ days each year.

I got excited because I will soon fill that criteria. Here’s my history.

March 2008 -> July 2010 ARC and 183+ days per year in tw for this period.
May 2011->now. ARC and +183 days (well…not 183 days in 2012 yet but July 2nd it will be)

So there’s quite a large break there, but it’s 5 consecutive years that I’ve had an ARC, 2008,2009,2010,2011, 2012, and each of those years I’ve been in TW 183 days or more.

I called “information for foreigners” (it’s 9pm, other lines are closed) and they said “no breaks” which is contrary to what I’ve seen. I checked page 1 of this thread and the law still seems to suggest breaks are permitable. I have to say though that I couldn’t find the stamina to trawl through nearly 80 pages to learn more.

I assume that my best bet is to call the Taipei APRC agent come July and ask him/her if I qualify, but if anyone can help shed some light in the meantime it would be great. As the break is quite recent, I’m facing another 4 year wait if I can’t get it this year. :s

Thanks to the Northcoast Surfer, I got over my paperwork phobia and I finally got my APRC.
That wasn’t so hard, it just required a lot of patience and that’s it.

[quote=“hbldom”]I saw in a previous thread back in 2008 about the subject of “breaks” and that people were having APRCs approved even though they had taken a break between ARCs, due to the fact they had been living legally on an ARC for 5 consecutive years, and had been in TW for 183+ days each year.

I got excited because I will soon fill that criteria. Here’s my history.

March 2008 -> July 2010 ARC and 183+ days per year in tw for this period.
May 2011->now. ARC and +183 days (well…not 183 days in 2012 yet but July 2nd it will be)

So there’s quite a large break there, but it’s 5 consecutive years that I’ve had an ARC, 2008,2009,2010,2011, 2012, and each of those years I’ve been in TW 183 days or more.[/quote]

You cannot have any break in your residency status, not just in physically being in Taiwan. As long as you held your resident visa in the interim between July 2010 and May 2011, then you’d qualify. However, if you had to re-apply for a resident visa in May 2011, then yes, you have had a break in residency and won’t qualify for an APRC until May 2016 (provided you got your resident visa at that time).

I had a break in my residency status of only a few weeks in July 2010, but I had already had a resident visa since September 2001 without any breaks up to that point so I fit into the two-year window of being able to apply. You can have the break as long as you have already gotten your five years in before the break happened and you apply before the two-year window after meeting the requirements closes.

Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you

[quote=“dicernthetruth”]Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you[/quote]
[forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.ph … 7#p1432267](APRC - Plum Blossom Card

[quote=“jimipresley”][quote=“dicernthetruth”]Hi APRC holders,

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on the back of your APRC? Please let me know.

Thank you[/quote]
[forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopic.ph … 7#p1432267](APRC - Plum Blossom Card

Thanks Jimipresley.

Not yet time for the whole write up but just so much as I got my APRC today now too… :slight_smile:

More to come with all details but so far thanks to everybody for the help… made it a breeze…

Congratulations and welcome to the club. :sunglasses:

I have a couple of questions actually:

First: I read that I need to translate my US address into Chinese but the street name is not common. It is Shiawassee(shy-ah-wah-see). I had a couple of friends try to transliterate it. They suggested 夏厄沃西, and 士雅瓦色.

Second: In reading the instructions for mailing all 14 documents, it says that you need to submit: 2 copies of the cover letter,two copies of TECRO’S application form for authentication, one copy plus original FBI background check, two copies of Chinese translation of my FBI background check, Two copies of passport information page, Two copies of ARC. Why do you need two of everything, especially the cover letter? I’m wondering if this is a typo or perhaps I just missed the point. Just want to make sure I do it precisely the right way. Really want to avoid any mistakes.

Thanks for any help you guys can provide,

Jason

Because the TECRO in DC requires 2 copies of everything.

[color=#FF0000]TECRO’S Document Authentication Service[/color]

[quote=“TECRO Website”]Requirements for Document Legalization/Authentication

  1. To request these services, you must submit a completed application form for document authentication or a letter on company letter head stating (1) the nature of the document, (2) the purpose for its authentication, (3) the names and addresses of organizations or individuals requesting the authentication, (4) the name of a contact person and his or her phone and fax numbers, (5) and a copy of the applicant’s photo I.D. (e.g., drivers license, passport, or naturalization certificate.)

  2. All documents (except diplomas, individual licenses) to be authenticated must be certified by the Secretaries of States within our service area (which includes Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C.).

  3. We do accept documents that have been submitted to us via an agent but only if the documents are accompanied by (1) a notarized power of attorney prepared by the applicant and authorizing the agent, and (2) a photo I.D. (e.g., driver’s license, passport, or naturalization certificate) of the person delivering the documents.

  4. The authentication fee is $15 per authenticated document. Payment accepts cash, money order or cashier’s check only (no personal checks or credit cards).

  5. [color=#FF0000]All documents must be submitted with an additional photocopy of the documents in their entirety. This includes an additional photocopy of any cover letter from a local government or the Department of State. If several identical documents are submitted for authentication, we require only one photocopy of one of the documents. [/color]

  6. Applications submitted by mail must also include a self-addressed stamped envelope. We also accept applications delivered via DHL, FedEx, UPS with an air bill form and account number.

  7. The processing of all documents usually takes 2-3 working days.

The Consular Division is open Monday through Friday (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) and closed on U.S. federal holidays, Chinese Lunar New Year’s Day and October 10th.[/quote]

Because the TECRO in DC requires 2 copies of everything.

[color=#FF0000]All documents must be submitted with an additional photocopy of the documents in their entirety. This includes an additional photocopy of any cover letter from a local government or the Department of State. If several identical documents are submitted for authentication, we require only one photocopy of one of the documents. [/color]

[/quote]

Thanks for the quick response. I read several pages through the topic, but missed that section. My head has been throbbing working on this and my thesis at the same time.

Any advice on the Chinese translation?

None of my clients’ translations have ever been rejected after being translated by this company.

None of my clients’ translations have ever been rejected after being translated by this company.

[/quote]

Thanks Northcoast. I just did some Googling using the transliterations from my friends and found that one of them gave me hits back in English with the correct translation. Should have done that first. Feel scatterbrained.

[quote=“henryhu”]Just got an email from TECRO in the States, and they have a new regulation regarding the translation of the FBI background check. They wrote:

[color=#BF0000]As for the authentication of the Chinese translation version, according to the new regulation, you have to be in our office to sign your name or have the translation to be notarized by the notary public in our service area (Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, West Virgina or Washington DC). Since you are in Taiwan, it’s not possible for our office to authenticate the Chinese version. please have it done in notary public in Taiwan. [/color]

Best,
Consular Division
TECRO

[/quote]

Any solution on this? Do we need to get the translation notarized before sending it to TECRO? I contacted the Foreigner Information hotline and they said I should go to the court to get it notarized if I need.

I just got a call from the TECRO in DC last night regarding the authentication of my documents. Apparently, they no longer authenticate the Chinese translations. They have to be authenticated locally by a Chinese notary public or court of law.

So this means that the Chinese translation doesn’t need to be sent to TECRO, or that it still needs to be but needs to be notarized first? :eh:
If they don’t authenticate the Chinese translation then that means we send 45 instead of the 75 USD?