APRC - Plum Blossom Card

[quote]Nice political rhetoric, though! They didn’t say flatly: “Come to Taiwan for tax-deductible overseas pay, talented so-and-so’s, as we could not find sufficient talent on our own island, despite our many universities.”

Where have I seen meritocratic citizenship rights tried before? I think it starts with an ‘s’ and ends with an ‘ingapore.’[/quote]

I don’t quite understand your point here. The Plum Blossom APRC scheme has nothing to do with tax deductibility or citizenship; it’s an arrangement for residency. Is there some source you are quoting? Or is this simply a vague swipe at Taiwan?

Guy

Thanks for that, Guy. I am actually quite surprised they considered a humanities professor “important” - anything outside of semiconductor physics was (10 years ago) dismissed as unimportant to Taiwan’s grand plan. The times they are a-changing, obviously. Just trying to get a handle on whether I might be eligible for one.

Not a problem. I hope this helps!

Guy

[quote=“afterspivak”][quote]Nice political rhetoric, though! They didn’t say flatly: “Come to Taiwan for tax-deductible overseas pay, talented so-and-so’s, as we could not find sufficient talent on our own island, despite our many universities.”

Where have I seen meritocratic citizenship rights tried before? I think it starts with an ‘s’ and ends with an ‘ingapore.’[/quote]

I don’t quite understand your point here. The Plum Blossom APRC scheme has nothing to do with tax deductibility or citizenship; it’s an arrangement for residency. Is there some source you are quoting? Or is this simply a vague swipe at Taiwan?

Guy[/quote]

Citizenship rights and citizenship are different. Different statuses afford different rights.
If you come from the US, at least, foreign-earned income can be sheltered up to $90,000.00 (is that accurate?) per year.

My comment is more of a sarcastic observation of the place from where they’re borrowing their “new wave” of ideas. Singapore has the same problem, and they have a visa program which is very similar to the Plum Blossom APRC that this thread describes. If you want sources on Singapore’s analogous program, I’ll send relevant links.

Hello everyone,

I wanted to pass along a quick update about my application. Earlier this week, I received a follow up phone call from Mr Cheng at the NIA Office in Taipei City saying that my Plum Blossom Card was ready to be picked up–and I’m happy to report that I now have it in hand! As always, Mr Cheng was extremely gracious and helpful, passing along warm congratulations and encouraging me to encourage others to apply. During the course of our short meeting, I learned that PB Card holders (at least those who received it through the “Senior Professional” category, as I did) are indeed subject to the 183 day rule, even though it makes no mention of this on the back of the card. Those who received the PB Card through the “Investor” category may be subject to different regulations–regarding this point I simply don’t know. Mr Cheng mentioned that they are discussing modifying this rule but as of now it is still in place.

In any case, I wish to pass along a shout out to Mr Cheng for all his kind help; to the OP (dicernthetruth) for starting this thread and providing much useful information to all forumosans; and to Northcoast Surfer for all the info provided about getting an Open Work Permit (which I did, immediately after getting my Plum Blossom APRC) as well as many other topics. Many thanks to all!

Guy

Hello everyone!

Just a quick question for those who have applied or have received an APRC through the Plum Blossom program.
I would like to talk to an officer (NIA, CLA) to see whether my background and experience are enough or not to apply to this program but here in Kaohsiung where I live nobody at NIA seems to even know what this program is about; they were just looking at each other (btw I was speaking Chinese) and the final answer was “go to Taipei”). Is Taipei’s NIA more helpful? Is there a specific office or person which is in charge of answering to this kind of questions? Anybody that you would suggest and how to get in touch with him/her? NIA, CLA or even my own country’s Representative Office?

Thanks a lot in advance!

Dear all
I am going to apply my PB card on the beginning of 2015
I live in Taipei, and I am grateful if someone joins the preparation procedure
This is new, we should give it a try.
My back-ground:
PhD in Taiwan in the field of automation system
Being research associate here in Taiwan and also working in RD dept of a Taiwan Company

I will update the case to all of you

@vanhoivanbinh
How is going. Finished ??

Hi guys,

I also need advice on the APRC Plum Blossom application. I have been living and working in Yilan for the last 5 years (5 years 2 months to be exact). I think I am eligible for normal APRC but would like to get the Plum-Blossom card if it’s possible at all. Problem is, my company’s HR tried to help me on this, but she seems clueless about the process, and the immigration officer at Yilan office also seems not familiar with it.
I have PhD in Photovoltaic (Solar energy) Engineering. Working in quite well-known Taiwanese solar company. I was the CTO of the company (but different title now since we merged with another company last year). I do not have Taiwanese awards nor books unfortunately. But I do have several patents in the field, few from my old work back when I lived in Australia (but patents applied here) and some while I work here. The patents are owned by the company but I am in invetor’s name. Does that count?
But some people still says it may be difficult since it is on the whim of the officer.
What sort of extra documents should I bring to help my case?
Thanks in advanced!

I apply at 2015 and have get the Card last Day. :grinning:

Congratulations ralf1970! It’s fantastic to hear that this worked out!

Guy

With this Rule every Plum Card Owner can get citizenship now. For my thinking.

Here’s a belated update on three recent Plum Blossom Card recipients:

  • An Indian citizen who received his PhD from the Institute of Biomedical Informatics at National Yang-Ming University and is now working at Taipei Medical University as an Assistant Professor;

  • A German citizen and nun who has worked in Hualien for thirty years (hmmm–looks like a likely candidate for citizenship too given the ways the citizenship issue has moved forward); and

  • A French citizen and engineer who helped to design the Taiwan High Speed Rail stations in Miaoli, Changhua, and Yunlin.

Source: http://nspp.mofa.gov.tw/nsppe/print.php?post=114073&unit=381

Dated April 6, 2017, the MOFA release linked above indicates that “more than 100 foreigners” have received Plum Blossom Cards since the first card was issued in 2007.

Among them is a former US officer who retired from the AIT and remains as a resident in Taiwan. The article noting this case was posted in another thread, but I’ll post it here as well to try to consolidate what we know:

Source: http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201703110013.aspx

The Focus Taiwan piece linked above is less than helpful as it contains some misleading statements, including an odd conclusion that the APRC is “also known as the Plum Blossom Card.” In fact, Plum Blossom Cards are one kind of APRC. If my students wrote nonsense like this, I’d circle it and hand it back.

I hope this update helps.

Guy

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Investment immigrants with one of the following qualifications:

a. Having invested over NT$15 million in a for-profit enterprise in Taiwan, and created five or more job opportunities for ROC nationals for 3 years.

From my reading of this the 5 or more job opportunities would have to be for 3 years, but the full investment NT$15m would only be required by the end of the 3 year period?

Otherwise it should read…

Having invested over NT$15 million in a for-profit enterprise in Taiwan for a period of 3 years, and have created five or more job opportunities for ROC nationals.

Any thoughts?

Well, I did not apply as an “investment immigrant”; nor do I know anyone who has. Perhaps there are forumosans out there who are familiar with this route?

Alternatively, you could simply contact one of the NIA offices (the Taipei City one is especially good, in my experience) to get some clarification.

Guy

An update on Plum Blossom card benefits: apparently there will soon (in October 2018?) be a clear path for such card holders to obtain citizenship. Today’s Taipei Times reports on it here:

Guy

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Like the comment on the fb site said… us mere mortals can’t apply. Only Nobel prize winners or priests please.

Nah, it’s not that stringent. But it is eye-opening that there are (at least according to the Taipei Times article linked above) apparently less than 100 current Plum Blossom card holders (under the so-called “professional” category) currently in Taiwan. Given the number of non-citizens on this island, that’s a drop in the bucket.

Guy

The Taiwan News article (seven posts up) suggests that, among other things, assistant professors and above at Taiwan universities can now apply for ROC citizenship without having to go through the MOE and MOI (as before). Does this apply only to Plum Blossom Card holders, or would it include assistant professors etc. with ordinary APRCs? If so, what is the new procedure? Just pop down to the local household registration, as usual? (But how would they know about our academic rank?)

That´s nationality of ROC… for anyone who does not have the blood of the dragon emperor flowing through their veins.