APRC - Plum Blossom Card

Hey guys,

When I thought to apply [color=#4000FF]APRC-PLUM BLOSSOM CARD,[/color] I did not find any information in this forum. Hence, I decide to share my experience on APRC- PLUM BLOSSOM CARD.

[b]APRC- PLUM BLOSSOM CARD brief introduction;[/b

[color=#FF00FF]WHY APRC-PBC?[/color]

The Ministry of the Interior announced a “[color=#4000FF]Program for Attracting Outstanding Foreigners Worldwide to Taiwan” with the aim of bringing in foreigners who can help upgrade the island’s competitiveness while enlarging the domestic consumer base and expanding tax revenues. [/color]The plan aims to entice foreigners to come to Taiwan by offering them convenient visa and immigration procedures through the use of three cards: an Employment Pass, Academic and Business Travel Card, [color=#FF0000]and “Plum Blossom” Permanent Residency Card.[/color]

[color=#FF0000]Details of APRC-PBC[/color]
[color=#4000FF]For professionals and investor immigrants,[/color] the government is issuing an “Plum Blossom” Permanent Residency Card. [color=#FF0040]High-level professional talents [/color]needed by the ROC, and foreigners who invest a certain amount in the ROC and conform to the relevant requirements, can apply for the Plum Blossom Permanent Resident Card. [color=#4040FF]Holders of this card are not subject to the normal requirement that they reside at least 183 days of the year in Taiwan.[/color]

[color=#FF0000]QUALIFICATION REQUIRED FOR APRC PLUM BLOSSOM CARD:[/color]

[color=#4000FF]o Apply
2. Qualifications Required:
a. aving professional skills regarding any technical fields in Taiwan or other foreign countries , such as the following:
i. New industries
ii. Key technologies
iii. Key components and products[/color]

[color=#4000FF]b. Having special talents, great performances and experienced on the fields regarding technical research and development in Taiwan or other foreign countries.
Fields as the following:
i. Nano and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems Technology
ii. Photonics Technology
iii. Information and Communications Technology
iv. Automatic System Integration Technology
v. Materials Applications Technology
vi. High Precision Sensing Technology
vii. Biotechnology
viii. Resources and Energy Saving Technology
ix. Top of Basic Research
[/color]

c. Having exclusive experiences or having remarkable achievement on the managements of:
i. Transportation (Ex: highway, high speed train, MRT etc.)
ii. Telecommunications
iii. Aviation
iv. Marine Transportation
v. Hydraulic Construction
vi. Meteorology
vii. Seismology

d.[color=#4000FF] Having professional ability, capability and having practical experiences on the fields of Science, Research, Industry and Commerce in which will offer effective and substantial benefits to Taiwan’s economy, industry, education and welfare organizations. [/color]

e.
[color=#FF0000]1) Being the current or was the former adjunct professor, professor, associate professor, assistant professor in foreign universities.
2) Being the researcher, associate researcher or assistant researcher in a research institution.
3) Having a Ph.D. degree or have had received an international academic award.
4) Have written a specialized book.
5) Have engaged in research at a research institution.
6) Have conducted technical research and development at a technical institution.
7) Being experienced in management for over four years[/color]
.

[color=#FF0000]f. Having achieved exceptional accomplishments on international research and development that can upgrade Taiwan’s industry.
g.

  1. Have been ranked in top three of the Olympic Game.
  2. Have won the first place in Asian Sport Competitions.
  3. Have coached a national sports team in the Olympic Game whose members have been ranked among the top five.
  4. Have been ranked among the top three in the Asian Sport Competitions. [/color]

[color=#4000FF]h. Have been ranked in the first place of an international competition regarding the fields of culture, art, technology, sports and industry. [/color]

[color=#FF0000]Required Documents:[/color]

[color=#4000FF][b]A. To apply an Alien Permanent Resident Card (Plum Blossom Card), MUST prepare the following documents.
i. An application form: You may obtain the application form from the local municipals; any National Immigration Agency (NIA) Services Centers located in counties and cities or download the form from the NIA website (immigration.gov.tw/) and print it out in A4 size.

ii. Please attach a color photo to the application form. (Use the same format on your ID card)

iii. Your passport and a photocopy of your passport. (Passport will be returned)

iv. Your Health Examination Certificate issued within the past three months by any hospitals in Taiwan. The appointed Health Examination Certificate form is in (Form B) on your application form. This form is promulgated by the National Health Agency of the Executive Yuan, Taiwan.

B. Other certificates or documents that show your profession and capability. (Academic certificates and other awards)[/b][/color]

[color=#FF4040]NOTE: YOU DO NOT NEED TO SUBMIT, EXIT AND ENTRY DATES, POLICE CLEARANCE CERTIFICATE, TAX FORM, WORK PERMIT, FINANCIAL CERTIFICATION(IF YOU APPLY UNDER INVESTMENT IMMIGRANT THEN YOU NEED FINANCIAL CERTIFICATION)[/color]

[color=#FF0000]
Application Units:
[/color]

Bring all the documents required and submit them to the local municipals, or any Service Centers of National Immigration Agency located in counties and cities.


[color=#FF0000]HOW APRC PLUM BLOSSOM LOOK LIKE?[/color]

APRC PLUM BLOSSOM


[color=#0000FF]I found two differences in PLUM BLOSSOM APRC, however, I do not know the significance ( I am trying to know).[/color]

REGULAR APRC


[color=#FF0000]HOW I APPLIED?[/color]

The procedure to apply APRC Plum blossom card is very simple.

First thing you need to know is, application procedure and documents needed to apply APRC PLUM BLOSSOM CARD IS different from APRC. Technically speaking, you need nothing but application form, educational documents and work experience certificates. I took10 minutes to apply APRC PBC.

Step 1:

A.
Please print out the information (In Chinese from immigration website) about APRC PLUM BLOSSOM CARD and explain to your immigration officer, if you are fortunate then your officer may have knowledge about this, however, in most case you have to give brief intro. In my case, I called them before I reach, hence, they started to gather information about APRC PBC.

B.

Just fill out the application form (same as APRC) and hand over to local immigration office with your documents (Academic, work experience certificates). Your field of study should be in designated areas as mentioned in APRC plum blossom card section, for instance, ICT ( Information and Communication Technologies) field with proven academic excellence ( International award, book, etc.,)

Step 2: Your case officer will contact you to introduce himself.

Step 3: Wait for a call from your case officer. Mine took 6 months.

Step 4: Card approved and wait for 2 weeks to get a card

Step 5: Receive your card from your case officer

Step 6: According to government website (gio.gov.tw/fp.asp?xItem=4869 … 500&mp=807), holders of this card are not subject to the normal requirement that they reside at least 183 days of the year in Taiwan. I feel this is the significant advantage of this card.


[color=#FF4000]Important: YOU DO NOT NEED TO PAY FEE FOR APRC PLUM BLOSSOM CARD[/color]


TO BE CONTINUED

Regards,
D

Is this better than an APRC? If so can I upgrade?

Please wait until May 21, 2012 then I’ll give you concrete answers for your doubts.

According to the OP, holders are not subject to the 183 day residency requirement. To my mind, that’s a very significant advantage. So I’m wondering the same thing as you DD.

It seems that you have to really excel in your field to apply for a plum blossom card - professors, Olympic medalists etc. See international.chu.edu.tw/english/apply%20arc.htm

Holders of this card are not subject to the normal requirement that they reside at least 183 days of the year in Taiwan ( gio.gov.tw/fp.asp?xItem=4869 … 500&mp=807, I am still waiting for clarification from immigration). If this is true then you will go for up-grade.

Yes, you need to be an outstanding professional in your field.

I got my Plum Blossom card for senior professionals over 2 years ago. In the back of the card, it stated that I must stay in Taiwan at least 183 days a year to keep the card. About half a year after I got my Plum Blossom card, I got a new passport (as the old one had expired), so they issued me a new Plum Blossom card (with the new passport number). The new Plum Blossom card did not mention the 183-day requirement. About two-three months ago, I went to the immigration office and asked if the 183-day requirement was still in place, and he said it did. (I am not sure if the officer was very knowledgable about this issue). So I am confused about this 183-day issue. Does anyone have any latest information?

As I mentioned in my previous post, according to govt website, there is no 183 days restriction. However, my immigration officer said opposite. In my APRC plum blossom, there is only one sentence.

" The holder of this certificate does not need to apply for a reentry permit to reenter the ROC" that’s it.

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on regular APRC’s back of the card?

Any APRC holders please let us know.

[quote=“dicernthetruth”]

Any APRC holders please let us know.[/quote]
My APRC says: “This certificate shall be revoked if its holder has failed to reside in the Taiwan area for at least 183 days per calendar year…”

[quote=“jimipresley”][quote=“dicernthetruth”]

Any APRC holders please let us know.[/quote]
My APRC says: “This certificate shall be revoked if its holder has failed to reside in the Taiwan area for at least 183 days per calendar year…”[/quote]

Thanks Jimipresley. My APRC plum card did not mention that but I don’t know why immigration officer asked me to stay 183 days. strange!!!

As I mentioned in my previous post, according to govt website, there is no 183 days restriction. However, my immigration officer said opposite. In my APRC plum blossom, there is only one sentence.

" The holder of this certificate does not need to apply for a reentry permit to reenter the ROC" that’s it.

Is there 183 days restriction mentioned on regular APRC’s back of the card?

Any APRC holders please let us know.[/quote]

The govt website on the link you provided is dated 2009. I first got my PB card after that, in the middle of 2010, but back of the card did mention the 183-day requirement, so I wonder how true the content of that website is. It is only when I got my renewed PB card in the beginning of 2011, the card did not mention the 183-day requirement.

[quote=“dicernthetruth”][quote=“jimipresley”][quote=“dicernthetruth”]

Any APRC holders please let us know.[/quote]
My APRC says: “This certificate shall be revoked if its holder has failed to reside in the Taiwan area for at least 183 days per calendar year…”[/quote]

Thanks Jimipresley. My APRC plum card did not mention that but I don’t know why immigration officer asked me to stay 183 days. strange!!![/quote]

He probably doesn’t know because he’s never seen the thing before. That, or the residence rules are as hazy and open to immigration officers’ interpretation as the rules for obtaining one are.

EDIT!!! Sorry, my bad I didn’t know there was any difference between the plum blossom card and the regular APRC. FOr your information this infor (right down there) is for the APRC the regular one. Has any APRC holder gotten their APRC in the last 3-6 months, can they look at the back of their card and see what it says? Because the officer I talked to was talking about the regular APRC, I assume it must then apply to both of them now? And perhaps they changed it for the plum blossom first. I will be going to the immigration office this week so I will try to ask and get officer names to go with the confirmed information for everyone.

(Original post)Actually, I just spoke with immigration about this and the office told me the policy has changed. Now you may leave for longer and you do not need special permission up to a year possibly 2. You just need to email them every 4-6 months asking nicely for them to not cancel your aprc while you’re away. Longer than that you will probably lose your residency unless you can provide a good reason for not coming back. Even then you could come back for 6 months and then wander off again for a year (in theory)

This is big news. You’re talking about the normal APRC, right, not the Plum Blossum APRC? If so, this is a very welcome development, and probably deserves its own thread.

[quote=“Rotalsnart”]
This is big news. You’re talking about the normal APRC, right, not the Plum Blossum APRC? If so, this is a very welcome development, and probably deserves its own thread.[/quote]

My very own thread!!! WANT :smiley:

Hello everyone,

Back in October 2012, I assembled a pile of documents to apply for an APRC Plum Blossom Card. This was before the change in the APRC requirements and I was hoping to secure permanent residency without the hassle of a police check back home. It’s been such a while since I submitted my documents that I had given up hope that my application was going anywhere. I’m happy to report though that Mr Cheng from the Taipei City office called today to say that my application was approved! I was told to wait for him to call me back once the card has been issued, perhaps in a couple of weeks. Permanent residency, here I come!

Guy

Without divulging personal details, would anyone who currently holds (or has been approved for) a Plum Blossom Card care to outline what it took to get one? I mean, specifically, what did you have to offer to your adopted country?

Hello Finley,

While I do not yet have the card in hand, I can certainly let you know what I included in my application. Along with the required documents (application form, health check documents, copies of passports and current ARC, etc), I also included details about my professional activities (I’m an associate professor in the humanities): education background, employment history, a list of publications, two distinctions I’ve received from Taiwan’s National Science Council (the major research funding agency here), plus a university-level teaching award. I also included a short corroborative letter from the current section head of the National Science Council to back things up. The friendly agent at the Taipei Office, Mr Cheng, was skeptical that the Plum Blossom committee would entertain an application from a humanities researcher and educator–but it appears that it went through!

Guy

Nice political rhetoric, though! They didn’t say flatly: “Come to Taiwan for tax-deductible overseas pay, talented so-and-so’s, as we could not find sufficient talent on our own island, despite our many universities.”

Where have I seen meritocratic citizenship rights tried before? I think it starts with an ‘s’ and ends with an ‘ingapore.’