Best of American cuisine: 50 fattiest foods


#1

health.com/health/gallery/th … 87,00.html

Some good eatin’ in there but I think being in taiwan ain’t all bad :slight_smile:


#2

When I ordered a bacon burger from Cosby’s in Taichung, I was given a bun with about 1/2 lb (uncooked weight) of bacon on it. That’s some good eatin’. I also took a moment to explain to the owner that westerners usually expect a bacon burger to be a hamburger with some bacon on it.


#3

Fried Coca Cola (no joke) won the 2006 State Fair of Texas (of course) Most Creative Food:


#4

Fried Beer. Also from The Great State of Texas.


#5

Snickers Cheesecake with non-Low Fat Heavy Whipped Cream, from the Cheesecake Factory:

There are larger cheesecake slices around, but not as ubiquitously sold in the US (Cheesecake Factory has 149 locations across the US). Their cheesecakes with the cream on top are over 1000 calories a slice (for the nastier ones - and when I say nasty, I mean awesomer). Their carrot cake is over 1400 calories.

[edit] and if you haven’t tried it already, you can get the small slice version of their original - which is better than most cheesecakes anywhere anyway - from Costco in their frozen desserts coolers for about 450NT.


#6

You guys realize that the vast majority of these “food items” – excepting perhaps the bliss of beignets – are food that no human ever eats. I’ve lived in Washington State for 12 years and have never heard of Crab Louis salad (alder-planked king salmon would be more like it); I lived in North Carolina for 8 years, and have never heard of liver mush (the authentic food there would be Brunswick Stew); I lived in New Jersey for 12 years, and have never heard of a Fat Darryl (the real New Jersey food is thin-crust cheese pizza).

In short, this list is sensationalist state-fair bullshit. Yes, we Americans eat some serious crap sometimes, but at least get it right if you’re going to assign horrible foods to various locales.

Empanadas in Florida? Please! You’ve never been there if you think that! California does love those burgers, but nobody gets such a big one except on a dare. Chicago, IL, does love the deep-dish pizza, they got that one right, and it’s too much for me but if you only eat a slice or two it’s bread, tomato sauce, and cheese… hardly the stuff of instant death. Philly cheesesteaks are fantastic; I don’t care if they’re bad for you, they are absolutely delicious. South Carolina did not invent the turducken, and you’re way more likely to expire there from Calabash-breaded seafood and hush puppies.


#7

[quote=“JuliaZ”]You guys realize that the vast majority of these “food items” – excepting perhaps the bliss of beignets – are food that no human ever eats. I’ve lived in Washington State for 12 years and have never heard of Crab Louis salad (alder-planked king salmon would be more like it); I lived in North Carolina for 8 years, and have never heard of liver mush (the authentic food there would be Brunswick Stew); I lived in New Jersey for 12 years, and have never heard of a Fat Darryl (the real New Jersey food is thin-crust cheese pizza).

In short, this list is sensationalist state-fair bullshit. Yes, we Americans eat some serious crap sometimes, but at least get it right if you’re going to assign horrible foods to various locales.

Empanadas in Florida? Please! You’ve never been there if you think that! California does love those burgers, but nobody gets such a big one except on a dare. Chicago, IL, does love the deep-dish pizza, they got that one right, and it’s too much for me but if you only eat a slice or two it’s bread, tomato sauce, and cheese… hardly the stuff of instant death. Philly cheesesteaks are fantastic; I don’t care if they’re bad for you, they are absolutely delicious. South Carolina did not invent the turducken, and you’re way more likely to expire there from Calabash-breaded seafood and hush puppies.[/quote]

I’m glad to hear that! I’m from Canada and I’ve been here almost ten years so I’m getting a bit out of touch with North America, but seeing the shows like “Man vs Food” and loads of chunky folks on TV shows about America made me wonder if you guys were headed for a Lipid Apocalypse!


#8

[quote=“JuliaZ”]You guys realize that the vast majority of these “food items” – excepting perhaps the bliss of beignets – are food that no human ever eats. I’ve lived in Washington State for 12 years and have never heard of Crab Louis salad (alder-planked king salmon would be more like it); I lived in North Carolina for 8 years, and have never heard of liver mush (the authentic food there would be Brunswick Stew); I lived in New Jersey for 12 years, and have never heard of a Fat Darryl (the real New Jersey food is thin-crust cheese pizza).

In short, this list is sensationalist state-fair bullshit. Yes, we Americans eat some serious crap sometimes, but at least get it right if you’re going to assign horrible foods to various locales.

Empanadas in Florida? Please! You’ve never been there if you think that! California does love those burgers, but nobody gets such a big one except on a dare. Chicago, IL, does love the deep-dish pizza, they got that one right, and it’s too much for me but if you only eat a slice or two it’s bread, tomato sauce, and cheese… hardly the stuff of instant death. Philly cheesesteaks are fantastic; I don’t care if they’re bad for you, they are absolutely delicious. South Carolina did not invent the turducken, and you’re way more likely to expire there from Calabash-breaded seafood and hush puppies.[/quote]
Agree that many of these are ‘gimmick’ food, but definitely not the In-N-out double double! That’s the standard size, and tons of people eat plenty of them. I did know a guy who would order 4x4’s at In-N-out (plus fries and a shake). That guy could eat like nobody’s business, but he couldn’t have weighed more than 120 pounds…


#9

With that kind of diet, just cause he has a body like a twig doesn’t mean he won’t drop dead of a heart attack by thirty!!!


#10

#11

Don’t know about anyone else, but whenever I read the word ‘muskrat’, this enters my brain…


#12

That rings a bell. Muskrat Love, wtf? When I hear the word I think of muskrats lol. We don’t have all too much wildlife


#13

Need to Know
If you’re cooking up your own muskrat, it’s crucial to remove the gland that produces the musky odor the animal is known for.

Yeah, that probably can’t be emphasized enough. :worried:


#14

You can see why it’s a fading tradition.