Does anyone from Kentucky or Mississippi vote Democrat?

US Constitution Article XIII.

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Section 2. …
Proposal and Ratification

The thirteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States was proposed to the legislatures of the several States by the Thirty-eighth Congress, on the 31st day of January, 1865… Ratification was completed on December 6, 1865…The amendment was subsequently ratified by … Kentucky, March 18, 1976 (after having rejected it on February 24, 1865).

The amendment was rejected (and not subsequently ratified) by Mississippi, December 4, 1865.

A post of such profound historical ignorance probably doesn’t deserve a reply, but anyway, here goes -

Mississippi, along with most of the Southern states, was hardcore Democrat territory until the 1960s-1970s, due to the Democrats “betraying” Southern bigots on civil rights. The Republicans were the party of Lincoln and until Richard Nixon’s “Southern Strategy” of appealing to anti-black elements in the South, the more progressive party in regards to race.

thank you for your enlightening response

You’re not an American, are you? Sorry for the nasty tone, but it’s generally not a good idea to comment on the internal politics of a country if you’re not from that country. Unless you’re really up on things, of course.

Mod Lang, are you on the PRC’s politburo?

Chinese Minister of Foreign Affairs Quote

Sound familiar?

Mississippi ratified the Thirteenth Amendment on March 16, 1995.

Source: The HistoryMakers, a website of African-American history. Please see
thehistorymakers.com/timelin … tring=1995

I qualified that with “unless you’re really up on things”. Informed critique is fine if you’re informed. But you don’t see me going off about the Tories and the Liberals or whatever parties they have in Australia, because I don’t know jack. Most non-Americans probably aren’t in-depth aware of the history of the Democrat and Republican parties.

a) yes I’m not a citizen of the USA
b) it was a question not a comment
c) why is this called the “international politics” forum - I couldn’t find the “feeble attempt at inserting some humour into a tiresome election battle that the media blasts at me despite the fact that I’m not a citizen of the country concerned, can’t vote in it yet it affects my fellow citizens who were blown up in Bali as part of an anti-western terrorist campaign that my government has involved us in”
d) maybe I should have asked if domestic issues such as equality of opportunity were actually issues of concern to voters and politicians in the USA! (Too dull?)
d) I think one major issues that non-US persons have at times is the fact that we are sometimes directly affected by internal political decisions in the USA but have no way of inlfuencing these decisions. I can’t, as a friend did, join the GOP to vote against a former President.
e) I think I can comment on another nation’s politics - can’t interfere as I’m not a citizen.
f) Have you ever said casually "the authorities in Palestine/Rwanda/Haiti/Sudan/Afghanistan/China/ROC/ shouldn’t/should do xxxx?

[quote=“pjdrib”] c) why is this called the “international politics” forum [/quote] I dunno. Might wanna ask Gus or Maoman about that.

[quote=“pjdrib”]I’m not a citizen of the country concerned, can’t vote in it[/quote] This is true, as far as I know. Not a recent development, either.

[quote=“pjdrib”]. . . yet it affects my fellow citizens who were blown up in Bali as part of an anti-western terrorist campaign that my government has involved us in[/quote] Sorry about your loss, but maybe you could take that matter up with your government.

[quote=“pjdrib”]d) maybe I should have asked if domestic issues such as equality of opportunity were actually issues of concern to voters and politicians in the USA![/quote]Nah, we Americans aren’t interested in that sort of thing. Seriously, we like sex, loud, rhythmic music, cheeseburgers, beer, invading Afghanistan and Iraq, some of us like drugs, and we like a lot of other things, but we’re not much interested in equality of opportunity.

[quote=“pjdrib”]d) I think one major issues that non-US persons have at times is the fact that we are sometimes directly affected by internal political decisions in the USA but have no way of inlfuencing these decisions. I can’t, as a friend did, join the GOP to vote against a former President.[/quote]Again, no, as far as I know, you can’t vote in our elections. So as for being affected by the USA’s decisions, that would seem to be something to take up with your own government. Maybe you and your countrymen could persuade your government to distance itself from my government. In fact, it seems to me that if enough of your countrymen exerted enough pressure on your government, then it’s possible your government could break off relations with the U.S.

[quote=“pjdrib”]e) I think I can comment on another nation’s politics - can’t interfere as I’m not a citizen.[/quote] I couldn’t agree with you more. Comment away. In fact, it’s okay with me if you interfere. I just hope you wouldn’t do anything to cause yourself any legal problems.

[quote=“pjdrib”]f) Have you ever said casually “the authorities in Palestine/Rwanda/Haiti/Sudan/Afghanistan/China/ROC/ shouldn’t/should do xxxx?”[/quote] Sure have.

Hope this helps.
xp+10K

Have I been drinking too much or has the title of this thread been changed, namely, has “Republican” been replaced with “Democrat”?
pjdrip, don’t take it too hard. Forumosa’'s members are surprisingly knowledgeable. Should a poster casually post faulty info, there is a damn good chance someone will jump on him or her.

No, I think it’s been “Democrat” from the beginning.

[quote=“xp+10K”]
In fact, it’s okay with me if you interfere. I just hope you wouldn’t do anything to cause yourself any legal problems.xp+10K[/quote]

What? Invade Wyoming?

I know it is a tiresome argument but 250 millions + the world’s largest economy vs. 22 millions and a small economy equals what sort of political playing field?

I was thinking of protests, but when I mentioned potential legal problems, I was thinking of those kinds of protests which involve trying to interfere with some governmental or societal function–in case your sense of the word interfere contemplated “throw[ing] yourself on the machine,” as some anti-Vietnam War folks used to say. That sort of thing could, of course, result in jail time.

But I suppose even purely peaceful protests–i.e., those which don’t involve stopping traffic or trains, or occupying university administration buildings, or acts of violence such as those done by the Weatherman faction of the SDS–could still be the occasion of legal hassles.

In any case, as I mentioned in another thread, if one doesn’t like someone, one can always leave them alone. At the national level that would involve revoking treaties of alliance and similar measures, or even things like breaking off diplomatic ties, embargoes, etc.

I suppose that for a government to do that sort of thing (i.e., revoke treaties of alliance, break off diplomatic ties, impose an embargo, etc.) as a result of popular sentiment, the people would have to express opinions along those lines to their government.

Just some suggestions, some shots in the dark, in hopes of helping your displeasure with my country’s policies find a satisfactory channel of expression.