English Teaching Conditions


#21

Haha maybe if it was the 90s/ early 2000s.

Thankfully it seems standards have improved at least a little.


#22

Good thing your (sic) not.


#23

Whoops, I mean UR*

I actually is
LOL


#24

This should be Taiwan`s tourism slogan.

Chiefy, can you do the voice over?


#25

I’m too much of a weirdo


#26

Does anyone else hark back for the days when trolling had an element of skill?


#27

unironically yes


#28

Well, you need to up your game then.


#29

Rocket won’t fall for the bait.


#30

You don’t even need number two.
I’m living proof.

White face and a pulse, welcome aboard.


#31

I think you are one of the sanest people I have met here Dan2006. Or does that make me a weirdo too ?:sweat_smile:


#32

Birds of a feather?


#33

Listen, bub, I’m pretty sure posting pictures of my Mom counts as outing.
Knock it the fuck off already.


#34

Jeez Louise, someone sure needs to get out more.


#35

It’s pretty sad :wink:


#36

Okay, let’s go through this and help clear up any misconceptions.

  1. If you teach at a private school in ESL only, a bachelor’s degree is adequate. Some schools (not all) provide the material for you, and you just teach out of your book for the year. You’re looking at 20-26 classroom hours a week, but your “schedule” places you at the school for the full 40 hour work week. Pay will be $45,000-55,000 NTD a month.
  2. If you teach at a private school in a SUBJECT, a bachelor’s degree with education (also known as a Teaching License) is usually required. Some schools (not all) provide the material for you, and you just teach out of your book for the year. You’re looking at 22-26 classroom hours a week, but your “schedule” places you at the school for the full 40 hour work week. Pay will be $60,000-75,000 NTD a month.
  3. If you teach at a cram school (Bushiban), a degree isn’t even required. Some schools (not all) provide the material for you, and you just teach out of your book for the year. You’re looking at teaching however many classroom hours your Bushiban tells you to work (could be 5, could be over 30), but your “schedule” places you at the building during nights and weekends exclusively. You will also not be guaranteed any holidays or sick day, and your contract is usually “at will” (they can fire you whenever they want). Pay differs dramatically, based on hours, location, student count, and “office hours”, but you can usually make $650-900 NTD an hour.
  4. If you teach at a public school, a bachelor’s degree with education (also known as a Teaching License) is required. Very few schools provide the material for you, (you will be required to make it all yourself), but you have the major benefit of having a coteacher with you (almost all schools) who is an English teacher at the school. You’re looking at 22 classroom hours a week (set by the MOE), but your “schedule” places you at the school for the full 40 hour work week. Pay will be $62,000-65,000 NTD a month, BUT you receive all federal benefits and holidays.
  5. If you do private lessons, all of the information is out the window. Some people will hire you if you have no degree, some people demand you have a degree, some people demand you have a teaching license. You also have no set hours and no set pay, you need to provide your own teaching materials and location. You also have no guarantee on insurance, student’s consistently attending or paying, and no enrollment in the Workman’s Insurance system. Everything varies, from time, location, age, pay, hours, literally everything. Don’t expect any situations to ever be the same. Just make sure you have the adequate paperwork, and pay your taxes on your teaching hours.

Source: Public school teacher in Taiwan (2017-2018). Private school teacher (currently). Wife was a Bushiban teacher (2017). Wife did Private Tutoring for Adults and Children (2017-2018). Multiple friends who own Bushiban through Nantou, Taichung, Miaoli and Taipei.

The BIGGEST requirement is that you:

  1. Speak English Fluently.
  2. Some places will only hire you if you’re white.
  3. MOE and most private schools will only hire you if you come from a country with English as the primary spoken language.

Also to keep in mind:
Many seasoned Private and Bushiban teachers will argue against my hours and pay that I posted above. Never assume you’ll work less or get paid more, UNLESS you personally are close with your boss/supervisor/manager/principal/owner, OR you have multiple years of experience/leverage.
I hard bargained my Current school for $75,000 a month (Private, International School as a subject teacher), but I have multiple degrees, certifications and friends that work there. My coworker, fresh into the country with MORE teaching experience and a higher degree is making $70,000 a month, because he had no major leverage or concept of negotiations here in Taiwan. Whereas my former roommate is working ESL at a private school with a bachelor’s degree, and makes more than $85,000 a month because he has connections at his job, provided his own materials and has been teaching ESL for years.
Every situation is different, most are around the base line I posted above, but NEVER expect continuity between schools or experiences.

Good luck on the job hunt!


#37

and teacher licence, right?


#38

Private schools only requires a baseline Bachelors degree. Any field.
The MOE requires a bachelor’s degree WITH a teaching license.


#39

can they get a work permit for a teacher without a teacher licence?

I have though that “Regulations Governing Educational Institutions at All Levels Applying for Work Permits for Foreign Teachers and their Administration” requires a teacher licence for every teacher at regular schools.


#40

Foreign bushiban English teachers are required to have a bachelors degree. Not all schools check and there are plenty of teachers who are showing fake degrees. Also, there are plenty of schools that offer afternoon hours since 1st and 2nd graders have class from 1pm until around 5pm. No weekends is not that uncommon.