Gay marriage in Belgium and its legal impact in Taiwan

After we have been together for more than a year my boyfriend from Taiwan (living in Europe for some years already) is going to arrive next week in Belgium to live with me here. :slight_smile:

This is quite nice for me as you can imagine but there are still some legal things ahead of us. In a few weeks time we are going to sign a contract before a notary that will legally sort out our common life in terms of rights and obligations: it

First off, I personally doubt if anything will happen unless you try to register the marriage here or claim some legal right to reside in Taiwan because of the marriage.
Do you expect your marriage to be covered by the international media? How would Mayor Ma know you got married? Are you planning on inviting him to the wedding?
My limited understanding is that no, gay marriage is not recognized in Taiwan and your marriage should have no impact whatsoever on your life in Taiwan except psychologically (and that would be limited to you and your bf).
Best wishes.

Usually other countries will recognise a marriage as long as the marriage is legal and recognised in the country it took place in. I think Taiwan does this too

therefore if two people of the same sex get married in Holland Belgium etc and based on reciprocity, does Taiwan or England or France have to recognize that marriage?
Now could they be put on the household registration? that’s probably a more difficult question

[quote=“TNT”]Usually other countries will recognise a marriage as long as the marriage is legal and recognised in the country it took place in. I think Taiwan does this too

therefore if two people of the same sex get married in Holland Belgium etc and based on reciprocity, does Taiwan or England or France have to recognize that marriage?
Now could they be put on the household registration? that’s probably a more difficult question[/quote]
As much as Hartzell, and others, have continuously pointed out the lack of reciprocity when it comes to Taiwan and Western countries, I just can’t believe you made this statement! :blush:
BTW…the U.S. doesn’t recognize gay marriage, unions, or anything else…even with their reciprocity for European countries…just an example of how reciprocity is only applied if it is beneficial to both countries. :smiley:

My question is not really whether the gay marriage is officially recognised but what type of negative effects it could possibly have for him in Taiwan. In Europe there are many positive aspects. Although the UK and Ireland for example would never formally recognise and legally accept a foreign gay marriage they are bound by international treaties to accept this couple as a legal entity

Concerning one and two, I really doubt it. Same goes for declaring a foreign marriage to the Taiwanese authorities. I have to admit, it would be really funny to see the look on people’s faces when you and your boyfriend turn in a joint tax form. As for the visa, why don’t you call up your friendly, local Taiwan rep office and ask them? Where are you now–there’s one in nearly every European country. That would be interesting to know what they say. It seems the embassy/trade office crowd has more luck getting visas for their partners than ordinary foreign folk.

Costco here seems to be pretty open-minded. I am sure you and your partner can sign up for their husband and wife membership plan.

Good idea, Flicka. I am going to contact them next week.

Please keep us posted.

After 6 years of ‘living in sin’ my boyfriend and I will be getting married in Amsterdam early next year. We explored the various advantages and disadvantages and found none which will affect us in Taiwan.

Regarding reciprocal agreements, The Dutch Ministry of Justice explains this quite clearly:

[quote] Consequences:

The consequences of marriage between two men or two women are much the same as those of marriage between a man and a woman. There are, however, some major differences relating to children and acceptance abroad.

Recognition of the marriage abroad:

At the start of this booklet, we pointed out that the Netherlands is the first country in the world to allow same-sex couples to marry. Some European countries have introduced registered partnership, but the Netherlands occupies a unique position when it comes to marriage. This means that same-sex married couples will have to take account of the fact that their marriage and its legal consequences will not always be accepted in other countries.

Legal advice:

Apart from practical problems and problems in the social sphere, a same-sex married couple may also encounter legal problems. During a short stay abroad, on holiday for instance, the problems are likely to be practical or social in nature. But if they plan to stay abroad longer, or to emigrate, legal problems are likely to arise, for instance in relation to rights of inheritance. However, the fact that a country does not recognize the marriage does not mean that it attaches no legal consequences to the marriage at all. It is possible, for instance, that the property law aspects of the relationship are recognized.
Before such problems can arise, it is important for couples to seek expert legal advice either in the Netherlands or in the country in which they are residing. It might, for instance, be necessary to make further arrangements with regard to their property, or to make a will. The Dutch consulate will usually be able to say which expert or agency to contact. [/quote]

We have also made contact with a number of government agencies including Foreign Affairs, Household registration, the Mayor

Checked with the local Taipei office by requesting a 60 days visa and stated that I am in a registered partnership with a tw national. The attitude was “as if we care” and I was informed that tw law does not recognise this partnership as part of the legal concept of family. They confirmed however that a gay marriage act is under discussion. Any one any news about that???

Therefore I was requested to put down “single” in the application form and put the name an tw address of my loved one in the appropriate box. Three days later I got the visa, a handshake and a friendly smile and I’ll be on my way next week. :rainbow: