German license plates behind Taiwan plates

Anyone else notice this new trend of local Taiwan people buying German cars here and then driving them around town with the Taiwan license plate affixed to the car, over the German license plate, but with the longer German plate still visible?

Is this a Taiwan trend or do buyers of German cars do this in Japan and US and UK and Oz too? Never hear of such silliness.
I asked one guy why he did it and he said IT’S COOL!

I guess. Is it legal to have two license plates, one in front of the other? Is this German car marketing scheme? Or a real bona fide trend?

[quote=“purplepeopleeater”]Anyone else notice this new trend of local Taiwan people buying German cars here and then driving them around town with the Taiwan license plate affixed to the car, over the German license plate, but with the longer German plate still visible?

Is this a Taiwan trend or do buyers of German cars do this in Japan and US and UK and Oz too? Never hear of such silliness.
I asked one guy why he did it and he said IT’S COOL!

I guess. Is it legal to have two license plates, one in front of the other? Is this German car marketing scheme? Or a real bona fide trend?[/quote]
Sure it’s a license plate? Or maybe just a plate with the name of the manufacturer or model of the car?

Got a picture? I am curious to see those. :slight_smile:

I also notices this new ‘fashion accessory’. I am sure most people in Taiwan have no idea what it means (like the Nazi flag bumper sticker on some cars :loco: ). I even saw such plates with a “D” (for Germany) on Japanese cars. :laughing:

The German plate behind the official Taiwan license plate is a blank German license plate. Funny thing is this "06 / 08 " mark to the right. This indicates that it is seasonal plate - very typical for motorcycles but with e.g. “03 / 10” (-> click). The “03 / 10” means that the motorcycle is allowed to ride on public roads from March to October but not during the cold months from November to February (-> automatically deregistered during this time - saves on taxes and insurance). Of course you can apply a seasonal plate for a car as well but considering that during winter times in Germany almost everybody is driving a car rather than riding motorcycle (it’s no fun doing this at temperatures below the freezing point) this is rather rare and only common for old-timers and probably some roadsters with soft top only.
The “06 / 08” actually means that the car is allowed to drive on public roads from June to August but not from September to May - and this is warm Taiwan!

For more information on German license plates, click here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_car_number_plates

I have seen this quite a bit and was wondering the same thing.
I’ll try to add a photo to this post later today as an SUV at my childs school has one of these.

I always wondered why people wear German (post-war, not Nazi) army (Bundeswehr) clothes. I mean, what’s cool about THAT…? :loco:

It’s just as cool as undone helemts on backwards.

What about this Baby in car? Do they actualy have a baby in there and if yes do they take it off when they are driving without the baby?

I newer understod trends.

I prefer one of these without a plate at all

Is this whats being referred to?

I see these quite a bit. Don’t understand it.

A French plate on a Japanese car??? :noway: Have you told him/her that he/she is not allowed to drive this car in July? :laughing:

:smiley: Will do…I guess the car goes on holiday automatically! :wink:

that is an French plate, the F is there. The German place has the D on it. Someone will post a pic soon

Latest in Taike fashion. You drive around pretending that you bought the car over from Germany/France/somewherefancyineurope and just slapped the Taiwan plates over the top of them.
Or maybe it makes an only somewhat German car more truly German, and thus more desirable. :unamused:

Boring, cliched and pointless.

I’ve seen them quite a bit down here. Haven’t seen one with the F on it but plenty of D’s.

I saw a Volvo with “S” for Sweden yesterday.

some 2 bit local plastic molding factory is no doubt now churning out fake EU plates to meet the Tai-Ke demand… Truly bizarre binlang trash fashion that it is… :loco:

Weird indeed.

[quote=“X3M”]I saw a Volvo with “S” for Sweden yesterday.[/quote]So maybe the twit in the pic I posted thinks that “F” is for Ford?

Unencumbered by the thought process…

added:
I know the SUV in question is not a ‘Ford.’

No, it’s not a license plate … it’s just a base for the license plate, without the number. In Belgium you used to get the back original only and have to have made the front at a local car accessory store.
Probably some one imports or europeans have them made in Taiwan or China.

In Europe this is illegal, having an other than your country’s mark on the license plate, but hey this is Taiwan …

Ha, than we saw the same car on the same day! There can only be one no? it was dark blue or black.
Besides, there are many “D” plates driving around. I guess they are reproductions as they do miss the 2 stamps on the right side (tax and province identification if i remember correctly)

Here. Two minutes of searching and they are all over the place…

tw.f2.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/b28493136

Says it’s the real deal. ‘upgrade the image of your car blah blah blah…’ : :snore: :wanker: