Luxgen


#1

Does anybody have any information or opinions on Luxgen cars? I’m going to buy new, so I’ve been doing some research on different cars; Luxgen have been difficult due to a lack of information in English. Most of the things I’ve read on forums (albeit using Google translate) are that locals think they’re not that great due to issues like poor fuel economy, and as they are a relatively young brand, should cost less.

I sat in a U6 GT220 last week and it from a driver’s perspective it was great - subjective I know; I’m waiting on my licence to arrive before I can test drive one.

Cheers :slight_smile:

@sulavaca


#2

Locals I have talked to think it is cheap and unsafe. I have also been told that Luxgen drivers are really bad drivers. Not sure how true that is, hahaha. But nonetheless it is what I was told by at least a dozen locals.


#3

Had a U7 not long ago. Bought new and sold it not long after. It was big inside and passengers loved it. You could stretch in the back on a day out in the mountains etc. Family said it was comfortable. Good for a tall driver too. The problem is it kept having problems all the time. Once AC, the other discs brakes, and the latter no matter how many times they changed would still come back the same problem. Until I couldn’t stand anymore the noise coming from the back wheel I had to get rid of it. If depended on the family they liked it a lot, me, not so much due to the headache of keepin having to go back to the service center.


#4

Poor reliability, low resale values. They’re generally puzzled together, existing technologies from other vehicles and not really designed from the ground up so it effects parts compatibility and reliability.
They’re cheap for a reason and therefore I’d generally recommend other brands such as Nissan/Toyota.

Even then I’d say many of the new vehicles out now I’m not a huge fan of due to compromised reliability and longevity due to government pressure to reduce emissions and “environmental impact”.
Older vehicles may lose out fractionally in terms of fuel efficiency but they often make it up in terms of total running costs, vehicle longevity, reliability and obviously purchase costs.
Main issues pertaining to new vehicles tend to be CVT transmissions and direct injection and PCV systems, and of course the added complexity of turbo systems.


#5

Amazing answer - thank you!

Even though you’re not a huge fan of new cars, are there any models that you would recommend? Nissan and Toyota are within my price range. Even a compact car like the Fit seems like an attractive option due to the space. We’re basically a family of 3.


#6

If you want reliability get any Toyota, other brands don’t even come close. There are stats on stuff like this, just google it. I am no industry specialist but I have met many who claimed Toyota’s technology is years ahead of others. I have no idea how much of that tech actually goes into the cars but in general its a great, reliable company.


#7

I’d tend towards non turbo Nissan, Toyota and Honda models. Also Hyundai and Kia have improved leaps and bounds over the years.
Personally I try to avoid cars with expensive LED headlights, CVT gearboxes, direct injection, turbos, and inverter a.c. compressors whenever possible, although this is now quite a challenge.


#8

There are still new cars with traditional headlights?

Doesn’t Luxgen do Mitsubishi? I thought they started out with Mitsubishi engines and parts.


#9

I have a Nissan and love it, but their service schedule every 5000km at anywhere between $4000 and $6000 a pop is a bit ridiculous. Having an 8 year warranty is good… I’m definitely paying for it though.


#10

I’m not sure how much Mitsubishi they have in them right now. They were producing their own engines.


#11

I’d pick Honda over Toyota any day.


#12

How about a Luxgen?


#13

In China? Assembly in Taiwan?


#14

Mazda is good too. I’ve heard a lot of people compliment the crossovers