Masters Degrees

I understand Danshui university offers a MA in TESOL. Are there any other university, linguistics or TESOL or teaching courses, - English language and open to foreigners in Taiwan?

There is a program in Hsinchu from the College of New Jersey. It would be for a masters in education. I think it’s better overall since you will get a State of New Jersey teaching license when you finish.

It looks like the program will cost around $20,000 USD just for tuition and fees. But I think it’s more flexible and a better option than linguistics or TESOL, unless you are really interested in those subjects. Here’s a link about courses in Hsinchu:

offsitegrad.pages.tcnj.edu/progr … hu-taiwan/

Here’s a link to info about the programs they offer:

offsitegrad.pages.tcnj.edu/programs/degrees/

I am very seriously considering this course through CONJ. Has anyone here done this program?

Would love to do the course but it is simply too much money

Perhaps, but the real value that you get from TCNJ is that you get a teaching license from the State of New Jersey that will last you the rest of your life. Those masters programs here in Taiwan won’t get you a teaching license, which you need for a lot of jobs here.

A masters degree alone is almost useless on this island. Case in point, I had a friend who arrived here earlier this year, around April, totally shit time to find a job, had an MA in TESOL from USC, and could not find a job that matched his qualifications. He said many times, if only I had a teaching license…then he could get something that was more at his qualification level.

The only reason why I would see to do that masters program here is if you take it to the next level and get a PhD. Then you could teach at universities here.

Then factor in how much that will cost, and how much time that will take. I think that the CONJ program will be better. But yet again, that depends on what you want you plan on doing here in Taiwan.

You speak well and broadly speaking I agree with you, I had much the same situation in Taiwan last October - the Taiwanese employers can be indifferent to quality teachers. However I am primarily interested in the the improving my knowledge of linguistics.

Go for a Linguistics MA, rather than a TESOL MA then. TESOL MA is for people with no background in linguistics and is very easy.

Okay, fair enough. Initially, you weren’t too clear on what your intentions were. But if that’s your primary concern, I think the one you mentioned will work better, and be less expensive.

However, for those who are reading this post and might be considering a masters degree, I think TCNJ one will be much better for most people, and has more practical use and better opportunities after graduation.

I for one, am looking to take a masters program in order to get better job opportunities.

I concur- a teacher aspiring to be a professional and desiring to be compensated accordingly should get a teachers license.
Though a previous poster here mentioned a TESOL Masters at Tamkang, there is in fact NO masters TESOL offered in Taiwan currently, so I will be looking at linguistics. I was also hoping to find a speech pathology qualification- any information here would be welcome.

According to information on its website, National Taiwan Normal University appears to offer an M. A. in TESOL:

[quote]M.A. and Ph.D. programs in TESOL were established in 1998.
In 1999, the graduate program was divided into a Literature Division, Linguistics Division, and TESOL Division. [/quote] eng.ntnu.edu.tw/en/about/pages.php?ID=about1

I’m not sure whether there’s still an M. A. TESOL program at Tamkang University. This is from a post made in July of last year:

[quote]So, I just joined this site and I’m moving to Taiwan (Danshui) on Aug. 27th to attend Tamkang University (Masters in TESOL).[/quote] forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 9#p1447069

But other than that post, I can’t find any mention by that poster of an M. A. TESOL program offered by Tamkang University.

Tamkang University’s site contains documents that indicate that, at least, there must have been an M. A. TESOL program at one time: is.gd/TKU_MA_TESOL_DOCS

Then there are courses listed on the site that are the kinds of courses that one might associate with a graduate program in TESOL: tflx.tku.edu.tw/course/super … ?ID=course

But I can’t find anything recent on an M. A. TESOL program at that school, so I cannot say with confidence that Tamkang University still has such a program.

(Edit: There is some mention on Tamkang University’s site of what appears to be an M. A. TESOL program being shared with Winona State University in Minnesota (but I don’t know Chinese, so I can’t say anything more about it)): [quote]101 學年度淡江大學英文系暨美國姐妹校維諾納州立大學 ( Winona State University ) 英文系碩二留學生修習學分 1 年、碩士雙學位申請辦法[/quote] www2.tku.edu.tw/~tfwx/chinese/101WSU.pdf

According to Yuan Ze University’s website, Yuan Ze University appears to have a Master’s Program that, while it may not be called an M. A. TESOL program, appears to be similar to one:

[quote]The Master’s curriculum is oriented toward Applied Linguistics, TESL and Language for Specific Purposes. [/quote] fl.hs.yzu.edu.tw/intro/over.php

I went to Yuan Ze University’s site based on information posted here:
forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 88#p992588

I completed the YZU program in 2006. It was comprehensive in terms of what is covered (although I learned more from reading beyond the required readings in some classes).

All but one class was taught in English. I’m not certain this is still the case, as I’ve heard that there has been quite a lot of turnover. Many of my instructors have moved on to national universities.

I’d pop by and ask to speak with some of the current foreign/local students in the program to learn exactly what is offered now.

A Linguistics MA (if you mean the anthropological route) won’t prepare you for teaching…but Applied Linguistics and TESOL are virtually the same course at most universities.

A Linguistics MA (if you mean the anthropological route) won’t prepare you for teaching…but Applied Linguistics and TESOL are virtually the same course at most universities.[/quote]

I have both. TESOL is such a huge area, it totally depends which modules you take, and by extension what is available at the uni you take the course at which generally depend on the knowledge and interests of the teaching and research staff, for obvious reasons. I was working in publishing when I did mine and didn’t think I’d ever go back to teaching (I did!) and so did nothing related to classroom practice. I wrote my dissertation on piloting workflows for electronic EFL products (as interesting and useful as it sounds … :laughing: ). I would say as advice, ask what courses are available as part of the MA before you make a decision. Friends have the same degree from the same uni and studied completely different things!

Think about what seems more interesting: teacher development and management, materials, ed tech, testing and so on, and think about a uni from that. I wish I could have done more on statistical test piloting but no-one knew shit about that that at my uni, so I was out of luck.

It’s a shame Taiwan is so down on distance learning because there were loads of distance students on my course in the UK and they did really well. It’s such a good thing to do while you are actually teaching because it feeds into your practice and your practice feeds into your learning.

Just some thoughts and some of my experiences.

A Linguistics MA (if you mean the anthropological route) won’t prepare you for teaching…but Applied Linguistics and TESOL are virtually the same course at most universities.[/quote]

I have both. TESOL is such a huge area, it totally depends which modules you take, and by extension what is available at the uni you take the course at which generally depend on the knowledge and interests of the teaching and research staff, for obvious reasons. I was working in publishing when I did mine and didn’t think I’d ever go back to teaching (I did!) and so did nothing related to classroom practice. I wrote my dissertation on piloting workflows for electronic EFL products (as interesting and useful as it sounds … :laughing: ). I would say as advice, ask what courses are available as part of the MA before you make a decision. Friends have the same degree from the same uni and studied completely different things!

Think about what seems more interesting: teacher development and management, materials, ed tech, testing and so on, and think about a uni from that. I wish I could have done more on statistical test piloting but no-one knew shit about that that at my uni, so I was out of luck.

It’s a shame Taiwan is so down on distance learning because there were loads of distance students on my course in the UK and they did really well. It’s such a good thing to do while you are actually teaching because it feeds into your practice and your practice feeds into your learning.

Just some thoughts and some of my experiences.[/quote]
Totally agree. Problem is that for most people they still equate online learning with distance learning and they are not the same thing.

[quote=“serendipityfox”]I concur- a teacher aspiring to be a professional and desiring to be compensated accordingly should get a teachers license.
Though a previous poster here mentioned a TESOL Masters at Tamkang, there is in fact NO masters TESOL offered in Taiwan currently, so I will be looking at linguistics. I was also hoping to find a speech pathology qualification- any information here would be welcome.[/quote]

I’m a Speech Language Pathologist, what info do you need?

Quals, from the US at least, are masters from an accredited university (including so many contact hours of internships, don’t remember how many), passing score on the Praxis, and a Clinical Fellowship Year. That gets you your Certificate of Clinical Competence and is generally the same reqs to get your state licensure. Maintaining the CCC and licensure is based on doing a certain number of CEUs per cycle.

Reciprocal Certification is recognized by the US, the UK, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and Canada, so no additional licensure is needed to work in any of those countries if you’re licensed in one of them. Other countries may have different requirements.

It’s a pretty good gig, but it’s really either purely clinical or clinical research based. Not really a linguistics degree. You’ll spend a lot more time in classes like anatomy & physiology, neuroanatomy, neurogenic speech and language disorders, applied phonetics, research methods, assistive and alternative communication systems, statistics, traumatic brain injury, dysfluency, differential diagnosis, etc. Of course various linguists’ theories of language development will be discussed, but really just superficially compared to discussion of remediation of disorders.

Not trying to push you away from it, but it’s one of those degree paths you have to be really kind of geeked up about in order to do well. It’s extremely competitive and fast paced, so if you’re not really into it you might have difficulty maintaining the kind of commitment and focus you’ll need (though I expect that’s true of all graduate degrees). Keep in mind that only about 10% of people who make it through undergrad are accepted into grad school, too. If I remember right my grad program required a 3.5 min overall GPA but anything under about 3.85 wasn’t competitive. They also required excellent GRE scores and a solid packet (letters of rec., letter of intent, involvement in the profession, etc.). An undergrad degree in Comm. Science & Disorders qualifies you for nothing in the US (I think that’s true of the countries with whom we have a reciprocal agreement as well).

Thankyou for the information and insight all useful.
I contacted Tamkang and no TESOL masters was offered.
Its a shame that Speech Pathology is not really accessible because I believe would have done well.

Thanks for passing the word to us about that.

Thanks again