Meanwhile in Hong Kong

#1

washingtontimes.com/news/201 … of-electi/

It’s all fun and games until you all get run over with tanks.

Crony capitalism = economic fascism = thinly dsguised socialism. Why should it not spread to the political process? All these capitalist trappings make people forget the PRC are – and have always been – Communists.

1 Like
#2

The latest:

nytimes.com/2014/09/30/world … .html?_r=0

#3

The mob gets its hand in…

dailymail.co.uk/news/article … rawls.html

#4

see also: “Be like Hong Kong? No thanks”

forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtop … 9&t=134317

#5

Not catching fire.

washingtonpost.com/world/hon … story.html

You get the government you’re willing to tolerate. No real democracy for you. And your peace and prosperity now exist only at the pleasure of Beijing.

Maybe naming their movement after a bunch of pathetic Liberal Arts graduates wasn’t the best marketing move after all? It did seem to trivialize the whole thing.

#6

Now let’s see whether the Taiwan election results can boost the people in HK somehow…

#7

It would be like a relay race. You falter, i kindle your fire.

#8

Looks like it:

nytimes.com/2014/12/01/world … flags.html

#9

As i said: who cares?

#10

(source: bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-29054196)

What’s new?

Don’t anger Beijing!

:roflmao:

#11

And indeed, it has died a quiet death. With a whimper, there goes hope, in the fumes of the growing giant.

#12

Is it all gone? Is it just a memory?
IMG_147968237633470 by Bolita5, on Flickr

Retaliation is still in progress…

[quote]A 14-year-old Hong Kong girl arrested for scribbling graffiti on a wall famous for the pro-democracy messages it carried has been sent to a children’s home.

Police detained the girl for chalking a flower on the “Lennon Wall”, a staircase at the main Admiralty Occupy Central protest site which became plastered with brightly-coloured notes of support for the democracy movement during more than two months of rallies.

Notes and messages have sporadically been posted on the wall since the protest sites were cleared by police earlier in December.

The teenager was arrested in the early hours of December 23 after scrawling on the wall and was detained for 17 hours, said solicitor Patricia Ho.

She was sent to a children’s home on Monday for three weeks while a court considers a police application for a care and protection order which could see her removed from her father’s care, said Ho.

She described the move as “disproportionate” and “shocking”.

The girl has been in trouble with police before, said Ho, but she added there was no evidence that she was not well cared for at home.

In a separate case, a 14-year-old boy could also be removed from his parents following his arrest as police cleared the Mongkok protest camp in late November.

Police have applied for a care and protection order for him.

“These types of orders are usually sought in extreme cases, for example the child is on drugs, or trading drugs or prostituting themselves,” Ho said.

“It’s a very worrying trend… it’s imposing a climate of fear.”
[/quote]
scmp.com/news/hong-kong/arti … drens-home

:no-no:

#13

I think on the whole there were a lot of victories from the protest. Xi Jinping lost a lot of face, the minds and hearts of the HK youth and the question of democracy was raised among middle class youths. This isnt going to go away. It may be a small cut but could be the beginning of many.

#14

Tienanmen Square pretty much went away.

#15

Different era, different situation, different level of maturity in Chinese economy, different technology available, different levels of wealth.

#16

yeah but the point remains Tiananmen Square did go away. It’s hard to predict the future.

#17

not sure I agree with this. Beijing pretty much left HK to stew in its own juices while the protests were going on. They held the APEC summit without a hitch and have left HK’ers with a feeling that HK is no longer as important to China as it once was. There is a sizable part of the population (mainly older HK’ers with jobs and property) who feel the students are misguided. CY Leung is still in power and high-vis protestors are being made examples of by Beijing’s refusal of their entry into China. I don’t think it has hurt HK either. It has helped HK as a society to become more aware and mature, and has given HK’ers conversation subject matter other than money.

#18

I take issue with this. They’re just fascists, pure and simple, going for centralised power at the expense of the serfs. Always were, always will be. The fact that communism existed at the same time and Mao seized on it and used it to give them a convenient cover that they could use to convince the masses that they were doing it all for them does not make them communist nor socialist. Sure, they used the trappings of communism: organised collectivism, etc, but it was a fascist clique in the background holding the strings all along. Do not forget that Mao was simply a country thug and bully who grew fat on the misery of others. Communism has very little to do with it.

#19

not sure I agree with this. Beijing pretty much left HK to stew in its own juices while the protests were going on. They held the APEC summit without a hitch and have left HK’ers with a feeling that HK is no longer as important to China as it once was. There is a sizable part of the population (mainly older HK’ers with jobs and property) who feel the students are misguided. CY Leung is still in power and high-vis protestors are being made examples of by Beijing’s refusal of their entry into China. I don’t think it has hurt HK either. It has helped HK as a society to become more aware and mature, and has given HK’ers conversation subject matter other than money.[/quote]

Beijing’s nonchalance is just smoke and mirrors. They do care/did care about the protests and everyone in first/second tier China is aware of them and talking about them. Xi has a hard man, no nonsense image but the protests were able to go on for months. He definitely lost face in this whole affair. Older generation HKer’s share the same level practicality and love for the status quo as older Taiwanese. Beijing has done nothing but isolate the youth of HK, large chunks of the Chinese disapora and cause large sections of mainland youth to further question their government. Not the victory the protesters were looking for but a victory of sorts.

2015 is going to be a tough year for China, slowing economy, disgruntled middle class, power struggles in the CCP, corruption purges, possibility of more protests.

#20

telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne … ivist.html

Intimidation rules the world.