Need help: Installing Linux from CD (Internet download)

Due to not being able to obtain an English version of Linux at the bookstores I downloaded Mandrake 9.1 (not after one failed attempt though because my harddisk was full :blush: ).

There are 3 ISO files which should go on 3 CD-ROMS and I have already a free partition (aroun 7GByte) on my harddisk.

Q1: Do I need an extra partition for the boot loader? (I do think to remember this from an old version)

Q2: Should I use LILO or GRUB if given a choice?

Q3: Do I assume correctly that I just need to copy those files, i.e. there is no unzipping or similar to be done?

Q4: And then just boot with the first CD in the drive and follow the instructions?

Any advise appreciated. Thanks!

You can get many flavors of Linux including Mandrake 9.1 at Tenlong Bookstore on Chungking S. Rd.

tenlong.com.tw

  • You don’t need an extra partition for your bootloader

  • You normally seen will be give a choice between GRUB and LILO. It’s up to you to dicide which one … I believe GRUB is becomming more and more the standard (since it’s part of the GNU project)

  • which files are you talking about ? just burn the iso files on the cd’s (burn them als image files !!! do not just place them on the cd)

  • when correctly burned, the cd’s should be bootable and, so you just have to boot your pc and follow the instructions :slight_smile: Make sure you pick the right partition to install on :wink:

I guess that’s where the problem will be: I used to install my first Linux a long time ago from a distribution I purchased (with manuals).

Now I downloaded those 3 files from the net (Mandrake website mirror) which are called Mandrake91-cd#-inst.i586.iso (where # = 1, 2 and 3).
So when you say “burn as images” how do I do that? Haven’t burned many CDs yet …

[quote=“Rascal”]Now I downloaded those 3 files from the net (Mandrake website mirror) which are called Mandrake91-cd#-inst.i586.iso (where # = 1, 2 and 3).
So when you say “burn as images” how do I do that? Haven’t burned many CDs yet …[/quote]

If you’re using Nero 5, simply click on “File” and go down and click “Burn Image”…if you’re using Nero 6, click on “Recorder” and then click “Burn Image”. If you’re using something other than Nero I can’t help…it’s about the only reliable burning software for Windows.

I think we have a Chinese version of Nero on the PC with the CD-writer, will get one of my colleagues to help me with that. Thanks. :slight_smile:

Thought I just let you know I am up and running, posting this under Linux using Konqueror.
Thanks for your help, was really easy after burning the CD-ROMs … :smiley:

[quote=“Rascal”]Thought I just let you know I am up and running, posting this under Linux using Konqueror.
Thanks for your help, was really easy after burning the CD-ROMs … :smiley:[/quote]

Outstanding! Welcome to the club. :smiley:

Linux marches on :smiley:

if have a little page on using Chinese in linux :
http://seba.ulyssis.org/thesis/linux.php

feel free to contribute or ask some more info :slight_smile:

Would there be somebody around to hold my hand (via the magic of Internet, don’t worry too much!) if I were to install Linux on my now-to-be-old laptop, after the new one arrives? I’d like to get into the swing of free or open-source, but can’t risk being off-line with customers nipping at my heels and so forth.

I expect the new computer Friday.

Would I need to re-format my hard drive on the old laptop? Can you “replace” the existing Windoze system with Linux somehow? It’s NOT an old machine, but the Windoze system is so screwed up that it’s as though it’s got leprosy…keeps losing devices and such. (Actually it’s a Compaq, I’ve heard rumors of bad memory chips.)

If you want to replace Windows entirely than you can just install Linux over it.
During the installation process Linux will format the harddisk partitions it requires (or those you choose). If you have lot’s of space you can keep Windows and the Linux boot-loader will allow you to choose which operating system you want to start after switching on the laptop. In this case you would need to have the harddisk partitioned - which can be troublesome / risky if there is currently only one (taken by Windows).
If you don’t need Windows it should be no trouble since Mandrake’s installation routine also includes a tool to partition the harddisk for Linux, it usually requires one primary partition for itself and an extended partition as swap drive (kind of virtual/temporary “memory” like the old versions of Windows used to require). There is an option for automatic allocation but it didn’t work for me, perhaps because I chose to keep my WinXP partition.

There are plenty of applications included in the Mandrake 9.1 release, could surf the web in no time without even doing any configuration. :slight_smile:

Mandrake is to be said one of the most user-friendly distributions although that
SUSE http://www.suse.com/ and RedHat http://www.redhat.com/ aren’t bad neither.

if you don’t like to look for the iso files, this site might help you out:
http://www.linuxiso.org/

I used to have a compaq laptop, and it was a relief when the damn thing finally died. Hope you’re not buying another one, Ironlady?

Anyway, I tried to install RedHat several times and it was never 100% successful. I was able to do the partitions OK, and keep Win98, but Linux the system was never really reliable and eventually I gave up in disgust. Re-installing over the top got problematical, and after a few attempts I would usually have to reformat the whole machine.

Someone told me that many laptops can be a bit quirky this way. Is this true? Is it better just to erase Win completely?

I have a new laptop now and, although I’m still keen to tinker with Linux, I’m extremely nervous about the idea of screwing up what I have. I’m running WinXP ‘purchased’ with the machine, and don’t have any restore CD.

It apparently has 2 HDDs (14.6 and 13.2G), but I don’t know if this is really 2 physical drives. I only use one, but the other has a couple of system files (6Mb) that I’m nervous about moving. Also, it doesn’t have any internal drives, except the HDD.

The CD plugs into the USB. Would that cause problems during installation?

I’ve been thinking of buying a 2nd-hand desktop, and maybe installing there first. Smarter, but costs $s and takes up precious physical space in my little bachelor pad.

Suggestions anyone?

Also, are Linux systems able to talk to Palm PDAs, or will I always have to use M$ for that?

[quote=“tmwc”]
I have a new laptop now and, although I’m still keen to tinker with Linux, I’m extremely nervous about the idea of screwing up what I have. I’m running WinXP ‘purchased’ with the machine, and don’t have any restore CD.[/quote]

Exactly what model is it?

You can buy a brand new desktop now for 9,000NT. I just built one for a neighbor.

No problem. On a KDE desktop you can use KPilot.

slac.com/pilone/kpilot_home/

More info and screenshot here:

pim.kde.org/components/kpilot.php

I’ve been using linux for maybe 8 years now. Just out of interest is there widespread use of Linux in the business community in Taiwan. China is really pushing the use of the Linux and opensource software … does the same go for Taiwan.
Cheers …

Not that I noticed. And judging by the “computer skills” of my so-called engineers I think it’s a good idea to stick with Windows for the time being (though even that seems to be too complicated for one of them).

Sad but true.

In your typical MS department at your average Taiwan company it’s definitely Microsoft all the way. A lot of recent college grads have pretty good Linux skills, but their managers have invested their careers in Microsft and are not about to change.

At Internet companies and networking companies like Yam, it’s a whole different story. Linux all over at least in the backroom.

Would you say that there is possibility in getting a job based on Linux skills? For example in the area of Embedded systems, telecoms, ISP’s etc. ?
The reason being I am trying to get a job in Taiwan …
Perhaps a bit off the topic but, with Linux in mind:
Is it possible for “foreigners” to set up a business in Taiwan?
I have heard from a friend that it is relatively easy to register a business in HongKong … anyone know if this is true … and if it is then possible to open up “shop” in Taiwan?

cheers…

Are you looking for an expat job with all the bells & whistles or willing to work on local terms?

[quote=“coami”]Would you say that there is possibility in getting a job based on Linux skills? For example in the area of Embedded systems, telecoms, ISP’s etc. ?
[/quote]

I know of a few foreigners with linux-related jobs. Most are married, so they qualify for open work permits and companies can hire them. Please search in the legal threads for open work permits if you ahve questions about these.

If you can’t get an open work permit, you are going to have to be a very highly qualified engineer in a hot field like embedded systems.If it is a mid-level or entry-level position, the authorities are likely to tell your company that they can hire a local and that they can’t hire you. Still you can always try.

Yes. This may be your best bet if you want to sell Linux services in Taiwan. See today’s article in the Taipei Times.
taipeitimes.com/News/biz/arc … 2003070003

This is one strategy. You can then set up a representative office in Taipei. It depends on your busines model, what services you want to provide, and tax issues.

You should talk to a lawyer about this.