No shower curtains in home bathrooms?

Ok, I have yet visited Taiwan and planning to this summer (with anticipation of moving there) . My husband is from there and has lots of relatives living all over Taiwan. He has been telling me about the way bathrooms are setup in the homes he’s been in. Everyone seems to have a shower or tub with a very low shower head and no curtain (except one person!). He said all the water sprays out everywhere, so everything gets wet.

Is there a reason no one uses shower curtains there? Or is it just my weird in-laws?!?!

I think a bathroom where everything is designed to get wet is the single thing I miss most about Taiwan when I’m away. It just makes sense. Usually, there’s a drain in the floor and the room is the easiest to clean in the entire house. You don’t have to worry that water sprays out of the shower, or sloshes out of the tub, because the entire room is usually tiled! Imagine that. The very thing that makes one cringe on the outside of the building is completely functionally genius in the bathroom. It’s at least one thing Taiwan does better than the West. :2cents:

Parts of that I understand. However, in his parents home, the shower was right next to the sink. The mirror was all spotted up and the tooth brushes were wet. Even the toilet was partially wet! I’d think it would take more time to wipe everything down after a shower. And more places for soap scum or mildew to collect. I totally wouldn’t want to use my tooth brush and SURPRISE it’s soapy and minty! LOL!

I’ve stayed in a hotel in Europe that had a similar setup. One drain, no curtain. The bathroom looked like a dishwasher once a family of 4 was done! There wasn’t a safe place to put your dry clean clothes.

We have shower curtains. However, my wife’s parents don’t. Their house is considerably older than our apartment which might have something to do with it.

That’s the standard in Taiwan. I’m not a big fan of it since if you want to go to the bathroom your feet get wet while sitting at the toilet. Or worse your socks if it is cooler. I hate wearing those stupid sandals. My bathroom has a glass enclosed shower with this strange sauna type thing in it. I’m not a fan of that but I like the enclosed part.

You cannot be serious! :slight_smile: I’ve used bathrooms with either fully enclosed shower boxes or bathtubs with partial foldable boxes and not once I have had the problem of spraying water everywhere. Here in Taiwan I have to constantly dry the floor in the bathroom (we’re three in my apartment and all practice outdoor sports, ergo we use the shower all the time), molds grows much more easily and I always end up entering the bathroom with my socks on and getting them wet! I really cannot see how anyone could prefer this system to a dry, tidy bathroom where shower water stays where it belongs, I.e. in the shower! :slight_smile: I’ve recently visited my parents in Europe and I could not believe how clean and dry their bathroom was!

[quote=“DarDar2001”]Parts of that I understand. However, in his parents home, the shower was right next to the sink. The mirror was all spotted up and the tooth brushes were wet. Even the toilet was partially wet! I’d think it would take more time to wipe everything down after a shower. And more places for soap scum or mildew to collect. I totally wouldn’t want to use my tooth brush and SURPRISE it’s soapy and minty! LOL!

I’ve stayed in a hotel in Europe that had a similar setup. One drain, no curtain. The bathroom looked like a dishwasher once a family of 4 was done! There wasn’t a safe place to put your dry clean clothes.[/quote]

That’s exactly my situation. It was much worse when my ex gf (Taiwanese) lived with me, 'cause she categorically refused to let me install a curtain. Now we have one and, while the floor still gets wet, we can at least keep water from spraying everywhere.

As others have said, the norm here is to not have shower curtains - and yes, the whole bathroom gets wet, which is the main reason I seldom wear socks at home anymore.

You can buy shower curtains and rods - I believe we got ours at Ikea.

That sounds pretty chilly in the winter on tile floors.

That kinda surprised me too, but I bought a shower curtain and rod. Taipei is so humid that it takes forever for the water to evaporate (sometimes it doesn’t). The floor in my apartment isn’t angled well and the water never fully drains from some areas, which causes mold to grow. So either you deal with the mold or use a mop to wipe it up. Adding a curtain helped keep it drier, resulting in a lot less work on my part.

I thought everyone uses a dehumidifier in the bathroom. If you don’t you should. No other way to get rid of the moisture in most cases.

You cannot be serious! :slight_smile:[/quote]

I think it’s great too. There have been times back in the U.S. when I wanted to take something big into the shower and clean it (say, rinsing down a glass tabletop), and it wouldn’t fit into the shower stall.

If you want to put up a shower curtain, nothing stops you except your own laziness and lack of ingenuity.

@DarDar: In many parts of the world, including a lot of Asia, Taiwan included, a bathroom where the floor is meant to stay dry outside of the shower area is considered “western style” (and of course lifestyles are getting more “westernized” bit by bit). By tradition, in these places, the whole floor of the bathroom is meant to get wet - perhaps you could regard it as a shower recess that is the size of a whole room (hmm… some of those bathrooms are small enough to BE just a recess…). In fact, I know some Asians living in the West who, instead of using a mop to clean their bathroom, still feel it’s cleaner and better if they regularly slosh a whole bucket of water over their bathroom floor just as they used to “back home”. The thought of having the bathroom carpeted as sometimes found in the West would be as astounding in these countries, as you would be astounded by why they don’t simply have a curtained recess to keep the bathroom less “messy”.

If you want to do your head in some more, just ask about the types and use of toilet paper in Taiwan. It’s often not the roll type that you might think of. I still hate toilet paper used in Taiwanese homes that come in separate individual sheets. Again, I know some Taiwanese living in the West who import that, so that they don’t have to have rolls in their home, and can continue using what they’re used to. And what they do with toilet paper in Taiwan after using it… just “search” for threads about that on this forum…!

A shower curtain will get moldy if you don’t wipe it down after every shower. It is humid here and on top of that, the bathroom is wet…very wet. The norm here is open shower bathrooms. I guess you can call it a washroom with a shower head because most do not have a "bath"tub. The usual setup is a sink, mirror, toilet, showerhead, drain in the floor and tile covering everything from walls to floor. The room is just a small tiled box. Most bathrooms I have been in, if you stand in the middle, you can touch all 4 walls by spreading your arms out or be very near able to do that. They are tiny.

I also HATE those plastic bathroom slippers they use here. Those get moldy too and the Taiwanese I know don’t really care and just keep them moldy. It is disgusting! After showering we squegee the floors and walls and use a dehumidifier.

We rent, so not much option for customizing our own house. However, when we buy we will be designing our own bathroom with a enclosed shower and divide for the toilet.

When visiting friends with the older style bathrooms, I also noticed they shower a bit differently than I’m used to (I didn’t watch them, asked…) They usually sat on a little stool and used the shower that way, or used it to fill up a big bucket and then splashed water with a container. They also didn’t leave water spraying over the place during their showers. They soaped up and then did a fairly quickly rinse. That probably reduced the need for a curtain, and I didn’t see water sprayed over the sink and paper.

After my first couple of days in my apartment—after growing tired of my clothes, towels, toilet paper, etc. getting soaked every time I took a shower—I bought a shower rod and curtain. And as others have mentioned, I also don’t like having a perpetually wet floor. Problem solved.

I’ve noticed that the higher-end/more modern hotels and apartments I’ve been in often do have the shower area separated by some kind of partition or door, so perhaps the water-everywhere trend is changing.

We don’t bother, I’ve never really considered it either. The bathroom dries quick enough. No biggie. Dehumidifiers are certainly useful for other rooms in your apartments though too.

If you don’t like water getting everywhere, sit down! The floor’s supposed to be clean anyway. Or you can buy a stool and shower.

We don’t bother, I’ve never really considered it either. The bathroom dries quick enough. No biggie. Dehumidifiers are certainly useful for other rooms in your apartments though too.[/quote]

You are lucky. My bathrooms won’t dry properly otherwise.

You cannot be serious! :slight_smile:[/quote]

If you want to put up a shower curtain, nothing stops you except your own laziness and lack of ingenuity.[/quote]

Doesn’t stop the floor from getting flooded, though. As I said, I’ve installed mine since long. As for keeping it mold-free, I found the relatively expensive ones from IKEA stay clean for a few months. When tiny black spots start to appear, I just soak the curtain in water+bleach (95:5). It doesn’t ruin the curtain and kills (and removes) the mold.

Is everyone drunk when they take a shower, or are they chasing a cat around the bathroom with the shower head? Try pointing the water in the opposite direction of what you want to keep dry (i.e. an opposite wall) when you’re showering. Wearing socks to go in the bathroom? :loco: It’s ok to have slippers just for the bathroom, or a rug outside of the door to wipe your slippers off if the bathroom floor is still wet. Come on people. I find being able to spray water where you want comes in handy, especially for spraying off whiskers from my beard trimmer that get all over the sink and other places, or even the times when I miss the toilet. Placing a fan towards the inside of the bathroom also helps if you’re having issues with it drying out