Old Black Hands checking in again


#1

Hi folks, it’s been quite a while. Just wish to say a quick hi and that I’m available again for any motor vehicle related info or questions I can help with.


#2

oh nooooooo.:rofl: Nice to see you back
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#3

Here’s one for ya.

I’m planning to get students to test the effectiveness of DIY rust treatment recipe(s) as part of a “scientific writing” course.
Probably use steel washers as the target, if I can find plain unplated ones.

It would be nice to compare with a commercial product. I’ve used Waxoyl in the UK, which I didn’t think much of, and I understand the US market leader is called Fluid Film, and may be similar.

Is anything comparable available in Taiwan?

Of course the need here is pretty low. My car was unusually rusty for Taiwan but was owned by a surfer.

Might post this separately under its own title, but you’re more likely to know than anyone else which is why I’m posting here.


#4

Welcome back @Ducked


#5

I like your thinking, Ducked. I might add in a bit to one of my courses about the car beautician business. Get the students to do a wax on, wax off with my vehicle.


#6

I don’t know about commercial products. I just use a phosphoric acid - water 50/50 mix. dissolves pretty much all iron oxide. There is of course a time element to it. I’ve tubbed some seriously rusty bits in it though and even after a couple of days, the rust is significantly reduced. As this is so efficient I haven’t had the need for any other.


#7

Was thinking rust treatment/inhibition (hence the Waxoyl/Fluid Film examples) rather than chemical rust removal, which I havn’t done since I had a rusty boat rudder core, long, long ago and far, far away.

I’ve been told, though, that vinegar removes rust. More available than phosphoric acid.

I buzz it off with a flattened beer can, used as an abrasive disk. This does leave rust in any pits. I then apply sunflower oil as a binder and buzz some more aluminium on over the top, forming a metallic paint.

Seems to work pretty well but maybe it’d work better with some preliminary chemical treatment.


#8

Vinegar and baking soda does a wonder.


#9

Thanks.

But like I said, I’m after commercial rust inhibitors like Waxoyl, NOT chemical rust removers.

Probably you can’t get these in Taiwan, but it seemed worth an ask.


#10

OK, so inhibiting sprays like Waxoyl or FluidFilm aren’t likely to be available.

Maybe an aluminium-rich paint/primer would be a valid comparison.

What’s that in Chinese? Know of any available (local or global) brands?


#11

You’ve lost me on that. It should be something like 鋁底漆 (aluminium base paint). I have neither heard nor ever seen anything like that here though.


#12

Something like this?



#13

Yes, that’d probably do. I’ve used PuffDino Spray lubricant (basically a local WD40 alternative) but havn’t seen anything specifically described as an anti-rust spray. I’ll have a look for it.

Thanks a lot.


#14

It was a bit of a search to find it, at least on the east coast. Found it in one of the more professional hardware stores. None of the general stores that I checked carried it.


#15

Basically 2 possibilities for testing here. The self-forming aluminium paint described in the BITOG post above, and/or vegetable oil without the aluminium, optionally cut with mineral oil. The PUFF DINO stuff would be a valid comparison for the latter, commercial aluminium-rich paint for the former.

The third possibility would be to grind aluminium into oil to make a paint that could then be brush-applied as a finished treatment rather than formed in situ, but I havn’t done that on any scale, because its a hassle, and I’d expect it to be less effective.

There are probably more than enough variables at play with just one of these options


#16

Found it. 179NT IIRC.

Couldn’t find unplated washers though. Story (translated, may well be untrue) is that you’d have to order direct from manufacturer with a fairly large minimum order.

Not sure what the standard silvery plating is, but will either have to remove the plating (abrasion and/or acid) or just live with it.

IIRC its not very effective so may not slow up the rust much, and removal introduces another perhaps poorly controlled variable.

Bought 100 plated washers in a mom-and-pop hole-in-the-wall hardware place 70NT. Place with the PuffDino stuff would have been 300NT, so washer-shopping-around is indicated. Allegedly could have got them for 40NT in Kaoshiung but not worth going through specially and there’s nothing on at the flicks.


#17

Interesting. If you find unplated washers it would be probable that they will already be rusting unless they have an oil coating. Another alternative might be something with a black oxide finish.

A website like Taobao might find you some raw washers direct from the factory.

Or maybe just scratching up the plated ones a little bit is enough to compromise the plating.

Glad you found the anti rust stuff, good luck with your experiment.


#18

Quick question.

CVT transmissions - how reliable are they Vs old style automatic transmission?


#19

Overall, not very. Pushbelts tend to wear within a specific zone on their pulleys and much like scooters, eventually start to stick and shifting becomes problematic. The technology may improve over time, but so far the early signs aren’t good compared to the old ‘slush-box’ technology. It isn’t as if the technology is that new actually. Neither is direct injection. Manufacturers tend to be forced to some degree to incorporate “fuel efficient” technologies, forsaking reliability meaning that a car’s expected lifespan is now reduced, resulting in early scrappage and a whole bout of oil consumption required in order to produce a replacement. Such is government mandated “efficiency”.

I haven’t seen a car in 2019 yet which I can fully recommend. :pensive: