Permanent Spouse ARC


#1

I’ve just received the open work permit, Nothing can stop me now going for the permanent ARC. Does anyone know the present requirements for this treasure?

I’m still on a 3yr JFRV ARC, We’ve been married 7 years.
Many thanks.


#2

I’m not trying to be a stickler, but while we are at it, what is the main advantage of getting permanent residency over a 3-year ARC based on marriage? Of course, you don’t have to renew every three years. Aside from that, though, are there any real advantages? I think there are several of us married to Taiwanese, and this question is an important one to answer.

From my understanding, and I think Dan Jacobson shares the same opinion, you have more restrictions on staying in Taiwan with permanent residency than you do with an ARC. Something like 183 days out of each year. Is there any such requirement for people holding ARCs?

Are there other benefits to permanent residency that I haven’t heard about, as opposed to an ARC based on marriage?

Thanks for any insight into this issue.


#3

from what I can see the only benefit is that if your spouse should die or otherwise depart your presence you will still be able to maintain your residency rights, an arc would be cut off.


#4

Isn’t the qualification period needed for the Permanent Residence card
about the same as the average life of a marriage? If so, it will
still come in handy as when EPMD says “she wheels the Benz while you
go Greyhound.”


#5

Daltongang,
Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I agree with you, and also remember about this situation ocurring where the Taiwanese spouse died and the foreign spouse (holding an ARC) had to leave.

That brings up another question for anybody who can help. Suppose you have a child with your Taiwanese spouse that later passes away, and your child is a Taiwanese citizen. Would you be able to stay in Taiwan and get a JFRV based on being the parent of this Taiwanese child?


#6

The JFRV is a “Joining Family Resident Visa.” Your question raises the issue of who is joining whom.

I was confronted by a similar case a few years back when a wife (with nationality of a certain Southeast Asian country) married a Taiwanese gentleman, had two kids, and then the husband disappeared.

After a year or two, the disappeared husband’s Household Registration was cancelled, and the wife could no longer get a JFRV on that basis. She had two Taiwanese children, but MOFA-BOCA said that she could not get a JFRV based on that status. Hence, she was on a two-month tourist visa.

According to my reading of the statutes however, there is no specific limitation on who can join whom, hence I suggested that she should sue MOFA-BOCA in Taipei Administrative Court. Her level of education was low, and she didn’t want to do that. To my knowledge is still on a tourist visa to the present day. Actually, her affairs (and financial support) are being handled by a local Catholic Foundation.

Hence, I believe that legal action may be necessary to do anything “out of the ordinary.”


#7

I received my open work permit through having an ARC for five continuous years not by being married to a resident. I obtained this with help from Hartzell (many thanks again). Are others using this method?


#8

Hi again,

Your opinions and facts are interesting but I wonder if someone can tell me the present requirements for Permanent residency for a spouse.

many thanks


#9

[quote=“Hartzell”]The JFRV is a “Joining Family Resident Visa.” Your question raises the issue of who is joining whom.

I was confronted by a similar case a few years back when a wife (with nationality of a certain Southeast Asian country) married a Taiwanese gentleman, had two kids, and then the husband disappeared.

After a year or two, the disappeared husband’s Household Registration was cancelled, and the wife could no longer get a JFRV on that basis. She had two Taiwanese children, but MOFA-BOCA said that she could not get a JFRV based on that status. Hence, she was on a two-month tourist visa.[/quote]
Gives you a nice warm glow inside to know the Taiwanese government would rather make orphans of two kids than suffer a foreigner they could otherwise get rid of.