Poor sportsmanship by Koreans athletes

Anyone following the Olympics is probably aware that the South Koreans have starting throwing fits over loses and disqualifications for tournament manipulation. These fits include a crying athlete who held up fencing matches for an hour and Koreans bringing signs to events written in Japanese saying ‘‘Let’s celebrate the major earthquake of Japan’’. It’s my opinion that fans behaving in such ways should be removed from Olympic events and athletes should be required to behave professionally or be banned from future events. I also think there should be limits on mid-game celebratory screaming by athletes in sports such as badminton as it’s just low class. Do you agree that Olympians should be held to a higher standard and that event sites should reflect harmony opposed to racism and arrogance?

Considering that Japan unjustly occupied Korea and Confucius was actually a Korean and Korea invented the Chinese calendar among other things i think your post is inflammatory and unnecessary and shows your lack of understanding of Korea and history in general and yes the Olympics so far has treated S. Korea poorly and i hope they and yourself will recognize and accept the error of your ways good night

I think that’s what’s called a “leading question”. :laughing: The Korean fencer who lost on a dodgy call was obviously distraught, and I wouldn’t be too hard on her. Korean supporters who show up with jingoistic signs in poor taste are only doing their country’s image harm, in my opinion. I like free speech because it lets you easily recognise these fuckwits who would otherwise be invisible.

I think that’s what’s called a “leading question”. :laughing: The Korean fencer who lost on a dodgy call was obviously distraught, and I wouldn’t be too hard on her. Korean supporters who show up with jingoistic signs in poor taste are only doing their country’s image harm, in my opinion. I like free speech because it lets you easily recognise these fuckwits who would otherwise be invisible.[/quote]

That wasn’t really a dodgy call. That’s how the sport works. The clocks in the basketball matches are off by a lot by the end of each game (They don’t reset them like in the NBA.) and I don’t see basketball players throwing fits. Being a professional athlete should obviously entail knowing how to lose, but obviously that ‘‘athlete’’ hasn’t learned that lesson. Hopefully that Taiwanese athlete has :slight_smile:

As for the behavior of spectators, I don’t agree. These athletes prepare their whole lives for these events and if things go unchecked certain countries, not just Korea, can turn the event into a freaking mess. There was a Swiss athlete whose Facebook account was overrun with racist comments by coincidentally South Koreans and when he reacted - unprofessionally - on his Twitter page the South Korean flipped out and the Swiss team sent him home in response. If this kind of stuff was addressed perhaps that athlete would have had a better way to vent…

I also think there should be restrictions on coaches shouting like crazed zombies throughout matches – are they really that desperate?

Anyways, nationalism / racism in the Olympics is disgusting in my opinion. (And I feel the same way when American fans scream out U.S.A and I’m American.)

I’m living in Korea now.

Koreans exhibit notoriously bad sportsmanship in ALL sports - Olympic, professional, and amateur. They are some of the biggest crybabies I’ve ever seen and personally experienced. The reason: Their hyper competitive education system and the lack of instruction on good sportsmanship (and playing by the rules). In Korea rules are meant to be broken or at least stretched to their utmost. And if all else (lying, cheating, crying) fails, throw a massive tantrum.

Olympians should be held to a higher standard and fans who disrespect other nations should be banned. Koreans hate the Japanese, but there is no reason to be mean spirited at the Olympics.

I think that’s what’s called a “leading question”. :laughing: The Korean fencer who lost on a dodgy call was obviously distraught, and I wouldn’t be too hard on her. Korean supporters who show up with jingoistic signs in poor taste are only doing their country’s image harm, in my opinion. I like free speech because it lets you easily recognise these fuckwits who would otherwise be invisible.[/quote]
An Indian boxer was denied victory …pretty dodgy, and even the commentator said it was ‘daylight robbery’, but guess what? Shit happens. I am glad Asians are standing up to blatant racism :thumbsup: I wish more nations made more noise, I mean imagine Serena William or Venus who go on a sobathon when they lose fair and square, losing coz of a dodgy call!..the sign about Japan was uncalled for though.

Check out Roy Jones Jr. in the '88 Olympic 71kg final. To be fair to his Korean opponent he was clearly embarrassed to be given the decision and apologised to Roy after the fight (although the decision wasn’t his fault). I heard a story that the Korean guy offered Jones the gold medal a few years after the fight but he turned it down. Not sure if that one’s anecdotal. Gentlemanly bunch, boxers, as a rule. The officials can be another kettle of fish altogether.

Only one incident, of course.

I think that’s what’s called a “leading question”. :laughing: The Korean fencer who lost on a dodgy call was obviously distraught, and I wouldn’t be too hard on her. Korean supporters who show up with jingoistic signs in poor taste are only doing their country’s image harm, in my opinion. I like free speech because it lets you easily recognise these fuckwits who would otherwise be invisible.[/quote]
An Indian boxer was denied victory …pretty dodgy, and even the commentator said it was ‘daylight robbery’, but guess what? Shit happens. I am glad Asians are standing up to blatant racism :thumbsup: I wish more nations made more noise, I mean imagine Serena William or Venus who go on a sobathon when they lose fair and square, losing because of a dodgy call!..the sign about Japan was uncalled for though.[/quote]

It wasn’t dodgy. It’s how these events go. Lot’s of matches come down to seconds. If we are going to be so particular, then what about different degrees of rain and wind throughout archery events. which are often very close? And like I said, the situation in Olympic basketball is way off – they have been stopping the clock a good second after the ball goes out of bounds, regardless of who is playing. These seconds could easily change the outcome of a game. Nobody is crying, though.

It’s not like the Korean athlete was not aware that the match wasn’t over and was attacked by surprise…

I looked up the Indian boxer. That does seem to be strange. The scoring process needs to be transparent. But the Indian boxer has respect for the game and himself and didn’t throw a fit for an hour in the middle of the ring…He should be the one getting that consolation award not the poor loser…

[quote]Check out Roy Jones Jr. in the '88 Olympic 71kg final. To be fair to his Korean opponent he was clearly embarrassed to be given the decision and apologised to Roy after the fight (although the decision wasn’t his fault). I heard a story that the Korean guy offered Jones the gold medal a few years after the fight but he turned it down. Not sure if that one’s anecdotal. Gentlemanly bunch, boxers, as a rule. The officials can be another kettle of fish altogether.

Only one incident, of course.[/quote]

I think people were more polite back then. China with all its nationalistic BS and dirty tactics, which is what brought on the disqualification in badminton, have changed the attitude in Asia towards arrogant baby…Japan still seems to hold its head up high. I have respect for them (and the Indians).

I don’t really care for Korean athletes’ sportsmanship in general, but in the case of the fencer, she couldn’t leave the area because she was disputing a call. It took the judges one hour to overrule her dispute.

Edit: I see you wrote ‘‘area’’. I agree. But area doesn’t mean sitting out on the competition site…

That’s an odd regulation. Why was she escorted out? And why wasn’t the other athlete waiting with her? Is this rule particular to fencing, as the Indian boxer didn’t have to do it?

Yeah but if throwing a fit gets him a match, so be it. We Asians should yell for our rights. YOu know ‘fight for your rights’ thingy or you’ll get screwed over and over and over again.

[quote=“divea”][quote=“archylgp”]

I looked up the Indian boxer. That does seem to be strange. The scoring process needs to be transparent. But the Indian boxer has respect for the game and himself and didn’t throw a fit for an hour in the middle of the ring…He should be the one getting that consolation award not the poor loser…

[/quote]
Yeah but if throwing a fit gets him a match, so be it. We Asians should yell for our rights. YOu know ‘fight for your rights’ thingy or you’ll get screwed over and over and over again.[/quote]

It’s a shame the Olympic Committee is operating like this – crying gets attention while good sportsmanship is ignored – not to say that the Korean athlete was screwed: it’s not like the match started without her knowing…

I like a lot of what you wrote, but what about that US basketball team that got robbed in 1976 or something in the final vs Russia (USSR). They still refuse to accept their silver medals.

That said, I think the Koreans a a bunch of bad sports.

This was our girl a while back, because of cheating Koreans.

Justice, motherf***ers!!!
:moon:

Edit: I see you wrote ‘‘area’’. I agree. But area doesn’t mean sitting out on the competition site…

That’s an odd regulation. Why was she escorted out? And why wasn’t the other athlete waiting with her? Is this rule particular to fencing, as the Indian boxer didn’t have to do it?[/quote]

I guess it’s just a fencing rule.
From ESPN:
Fencing rules dictate that if you protest an official’s decision, you cannot leave the piste until there is a final ruling.

Koreans can’t help but be Korean, and unfortunately they are hype-sensitive and arrogantly proud when it comes to their country.

That being said, Taiwanese and foreigners living in Taiwan are a bit too critical of Korean behavior. That being said, some of the criticism is warranted, but the girl who lost out in the fencing due to a timing error was robbed of a higher medal, and those kind of events spark emotions. Trouble is, Koreans think that Korea is on the rest of the world’s mind more than it really is.

Koreans can’t help but be Korean, and unfortunately they are hype-sensitive and arrogantly proud when it comes to their country.

That being said, Taiwanese and foreigners living in Taiwan are a bit too critical of Korean behavior. That being said, some of the criticism is warranted, but the girl who lost out in the fencing due to a timing error was robbed of a higher medal, and those kind of events spark emotions. Trouble is, Koreans think that Korea is on the rest of the world’s mind more than it really is.[/quote]

She wasn’t robbed…are teams that lose by a buzzer shot in basketball robbed? No. That’s how sporting events go. She lost. (I just watched the replay of the event - the oppositions attack was well under a second…)

The Korean judo coach was sent out of the gym TWICE yesterday during two matches. First he pretended to not understand the referee. Then he tried to hide behind cameramen before being escorted out. During the final match he was still in the gym when his boy won the gold medal, despite being asked to leave.

Now the final move by the Korean athlete was a thing of beauty. That can’t be denied. But his coach’s behavior was poor to say the least.

You bloody foreigners just don’t understand Korean culture.

Sure, that final atack was under a second, but did you watch the FULL replay?
The clock showed 1 second, they restarted. Then the referee stopped the fight.
The clock still showed 1 second, they restarted again. The referee stopped the fight again.
The clock now showed 0 seconds. It was reset (! - for some reason) to 1 second, they restarted yet again and the German got a hit.

I don’t think that’s anything to do with Korean sporting morals, but more to do with the timekeeper getting in a muddle.

The Koreans were also involved in the badminton fracas, but their Chinese opponents were equally culpable there.
That’s the first time the round-robin format has been introduced in Olympic badminton, and it’s understandable, although not that Olympian in spirit, to seek out the easiest route to a medal.

Sure, that final atack was under a second, but did you watch the FULL replay?
The clock showed 1 second, they restarted. Then the referee stopped the fight.
The clock still showed 1 second, they restarted again. The referee stopped the fight again.
The clock now showed 0 seconds. It was reset (! - for some reason) to 1 second, they restarted yet again and the German got a hit.

I don’t think that’s anything to do with Korean sporting morals, but more to do with the timekeeper getting in a muddle.

The Koreans were also involved in the badminton fracas, but their Chinese opponents were equally culpable there.
That’s the first time the round-robin format has been introduced in Olympic badminton, and it’s understandable, although not that Olympian in spirit, to seek out the easiest route to a medal.[/quote]

Nothing wrong with what happened. That’s how sporting events go. It’s impossible to make everything completely fare: see wind and rain in archery. And regarding the disqualification: (1) they broke Olympic regulations, and (2) China has been doing this in other round-robin badminton tournaments; it’s about time someone called them on it. The other teams can only blame themselves for joining in…